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November 23, 1952 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-11-23

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1952

__________________________________________________________ I ________________________________________________________________________________ I

DUNLAP CONDUCTS:
Symphony Orchestra
To Perform Tomorrow

Indonesian Studies Elections

CLASSIFIEDS

.

Ph. 3-5651 U M C fA
Today Through Wednesday Only!

An Intimate Theatre
Bringing Cinema Triumphs
From All Nations

Mrs. Supeni Pudjobuntoro, a
member of the Central Election
Committee in Djakarta, Indonesia,
is visiting the University for two
weeks to study election laws and
machinery.

and women's organizations dur-
ing her stay.
While on campus, her work on
elections is being supervised by
Prof. James K. Pollock, chairman

I

i

Prof. Wayne Dunlap of the
music school will direct the Uni-
versity Symphony Orchestra in
its first concert of the season at
8 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Auditor-

* *

She will also study newspapers' of the political science department.
DAILY. OFFICIAL BULLETIN

ium.
Three symphonic works have
been selected for the program.
First on the evening's entertain-
ment list will be "Symphony No.
100" by Haydn. Commonly referr-
ed to as the "Military Symphony,"
the four-movement work has a
surprising amount of percussion
scored. This will be its initial per-
formance in Ann Arbor.
THE SECOND selection will be
Samuel Barber's "Concerto for
Violincello and Orchestra," which
is also making its local debut. The
solo cellist will be Prof. Oliver Edel
of the music school, who is also a
member of the Stanley String
Quartet.
Following intermission, the or-
chestra will perform Moussorg-
sky's famed "Pictures at an Ex-
Courtes To Give
Sonata Program
Robert Courte, violinist for the
Stanley Quartet and lecturer in
viola and chamber music, and Mrs.
Lydia Courte will present a pro-
gram of sonatas for viola and
piano at 4:15 today in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater.
The program will open with Bib-
er's "Sonata in C Minor" and con-
tinue with works by Ross Lee Fin-
ney, professor of composition and
composer in residence in the
School of Music, Arthur Honeg-
ger, and Mozart.
It will be open to the general
public without charge.

PROF. WAYNE DUNLAP
...,on the podium
* * *
hibition." Although originally
composed for piano, the work
has been orchestrated by several
composers.
The arrangement to be used by
the orchestra was especially writ-
ten in 1941 by Prof. Marion Mc-
Artor of the music school, at the
request of Cleveland orchestra di-
rector Thor Johnson, then con-
ductor of the University group.
The work has not been performed
locally since that time.
* * *
CONSISTING of 100 students, the
Symphony Orchestra has been in
existence since 1887 when it serv-
ed as the accompanying group for
University Musical Society. Many
of its former members are now
playing in najor symphony or-
chestras across the country. j
The University group will make
its next appearance at the annual
Concerto Concert on Dec. 15.

11

The Daily Official Bulletin is an1
official publication of the Universityl
of Michigan for which the Michigan7
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday.)
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1952
VOL. LXI, No. 54,
Notices
Automobile Regulations. Notice is
hereby given that the Automobile Reg-
nations will be lifted from 12 noon
Wed., Nov. 26, to 8 a.m. Mon., Dec. 1.
For those students having afternoon
classes Wed., Nov. 26, the ban is not
lifted until such time as their classes
are over.
Veterans in training under Public
Law 550 must pick up Dean's Monthly
Certification in appropriate school of-
fice, get instructors' signatures, and,
return the certification for November
to Dean's office on or before Dec. 3.
Final Hearing-Student soloists for
appearance with University Symphony
Orchestra will be held Sunday after-
noon, Nov. 23, in 305 School of Music.
At 1:30 p.m., Voice; 2:00 Piano; 3:00
String; 3:30 Wind Instruments. Stu-
dents are urged to be on hand at the
times indicated, since they will not be
heard if they fail to appear at the
proper time.
February Teaching Candidates: The
University Bureau of Appointments and
Occupational Information are current-
ly receiving many notices of vacancies
for teachers who 'will be available at
the beginning of next semester. Those
people who have not completed reg-
istering with the bureau are urged to
do so immediately.
California Needs Teachers: The Uni-
versity Bureau of Appointments has
been notified of vacancies in various
fields within various levels in the
State of California and other West
Coast States. Persons interested in
teaching in this area are advised to
contact the University Bureau of Ap-
pointments and Occupational Infor-
mation, 3528 Administration Building
or telephone University extension 2614.
Personnel Interviews.
A representative from the Ohio Box-
boar Company of Rittman, Wis., will
be on campus Tues., Nov. 25 to inter-
view February LSA and Business Ad-
ministration graduates interested ei-
ther in Industrial Sales Training Pro-
gram or a Production Training Pro-
gram. Draftable men are also eligible
to apply.
Personnel Requests.
The Oakridge National Laboratory
(operated by Carbide and Carbon
Chemicals Co.) in Oak Ridge, Tenn.,
announces they will accept applica-
tions for the Oak Ridge School of Re-
actor Technology for enrollment in the
1953-54 session until March 1, 1953. The
semester begins September 14, 1953. The
school Is conducted by the Oak Ridge
National Laboratory for the Atomic En-
ergy Commission and students in En-
gineering or one of the Physical Sci-
ences may make application. Those
men receiving a Bachelor's oregradu-
ate degree by Sept. are eligible. Spe-
cial emphasis is placed on preparing
students of superior aptitudes for the
conception and design of advanced
types of nuclear reators, nuclear re-
actor complexes, and their components.
For further information concerning
these and other openings, contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin-
istration Building, Ext. 371.
Lectures
University Lecture, auspices of the
Department of Fine Arts. "Indian In-
fluence on the Pre-Buddhist Art of Chi-
na," Dr. Alfred Salmony, Assistant Pro-
fessor of Fine Arts, New York Univer-
sity, Mon., Nov. 24, 4:15 p.m., Rackham
Amphitheater.
Academic Notices
Engineering Mechanics Seminar. Tues.
Nov. 25, 3:45 p.m. Room 101, W Engi-
neering Building. Prof. W. W. Hagerty
will speak on "The Decay of Secondary
Motion in a Round Pipe."
Interdepartmental Seminar in Meth-
ods of Machine Computation. Meeting
of Mon., Nov. 24, postponed because of
conflict with Engineering faculty
meeting. The seminar subject will be
given at the beginning of next semes-
ter.
Orientation Seminar in Mathematics
will meet on Mon., Nov. 24, at 3 p.m. in
3001 Angell Hall. The group will discuss
the Axiom of Choice and Logical Dif-
culties. Dr. Rainich will lead the dis-
cussion.

Doctoral Examination for William
John Snoddon, Chemical Engineering;
Thesis: "Tensile Properties of Certain
Pigmented and Non-Pigmented De-
tached Drying Oil and Oil Modified
Resin Films," Tues., Nov. 25, 3201 E.
Engineering Building, 2 p.m. Chair-
man, L. L. Carrick.
Concert
Faculty Concert. Sunday afternoon,
Nov. 23, 4:15, in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater, Lydia and Robert Courte will

play a program of sonatas for viola and
piano, by Biber, Finney, Honegger, and
Mozart. The concert had been an-
nounced for 8:30, but will be given at
4:15 instead. It will be open to the gen-
eral public without charge.
Exhibits
Museum of Art, Alumni Memorial
Hall. Europe: The New Generation and
Southwestern Textiles and Retabos.
November 9 - November 30. Weekdays
9 to 5, Sundays 2 to 5. The public is in-
vited.
Events Today
Young Republicans. There will be a
general club meeting at 3 p.m. in Room
3-S of the Union. The speaker will be
Congressman George Meader, from this
district. The topic will be "The New
Republican Legislative Program." Re-
freshments. New members are invited.
Hillel is sponsoring a "Rikud" from
7:30-10:30 p.m. This will be an evening
of dancing, refreshments, and games
with prizes. Everyone is invited.
Hillel. The Dedication of the Hillel
Building at 1429 Hill St. will take place
at 3 p.m, Dr. Abram Sachar, President
of Brandeis University, will be the
guest speaker. Everyone is welcome.
Graduate Outing Club meets at the
rear entrance of the Rackham Building
at 2 p.m. for hiking and games.
International Students Association.
Conference of all presidents and foreign
student leaders, 7:30 p.m., Room 3-B,
Union. The conference will discuss the
report of the ISA Reorganization Com-
mittee. Refreshments. An official Con-
ference picture will be taken.
U.N.E.S.C.O. Council. Prof. Preston W.
Slosson will speak at 8 p.m. In the In-
ternational Center. Topic: "Racism in
South Africa." Refreshments. Short
business meeting after the program.
Students, faculty and townspeople are
invited.
Roger Williams Guild: 9:45 a.m., Stu-
dent Bible class will discuss First Sam-
uel. 7 p.m., Prof. Arthur Dunham of
the Department of Sociology, will dis-
cuss, "The Conflict Between Individu-
alism and Social Responsibility."
Evangelical and Reformed Guild. 7
p.m., Lane Hall. "Five Grains of Gold-
en Corn," a reading recital on the
Thanksgiving theme, by Dr. L. LaMont
Okey, Department of Speech.
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club: Supper program, 5:30 p.m. Illus-
trated missionary talk by Missionary
John Wilenius, on furlough from the
Far East.
Wesleyan Guild. 9:30 a.m. Discussion
Class: "Understanding the Faith." 5:30
p.m., Fellowship Supper. 6:45 p.m. Mr.
C. Grey Austin will leada discussion
following up on The Very Rev. Pike's
lecture entitled: "The Individual and
His Faith."
Congregational-Disciples Guiild. 7
p.m., Congregational Church. The group
will sort, mend and pack clothes to go
overseas. Bring sewing equipment, if
you can.
Unitarian Student Group: 7:15 p.m.,
Square Dance at the Wayne Whitaker's
Home, 406 Lenawee Drive. Caller: Mr.
Whitaker. Visitors welcome. Meet at
Lane Hall, 7 p.m., if you need or can
offer transportation.
Lutheran Student Association. 7 p.m.
All-student Talent Program to be pre-
sented.
Canterbury Club. 6:45 p.m. Speaker:
Mr. W. Lloyd Berridge, Mental Hygien-
ist of the University Health Service,
will speak on "Boy-Girl Relationships."
Coiing Events
Le Cercle Francais will meet at 8
p.m. Mon., Nov. 24, in the League. The
skit which was presented at the Monte-
Carlo Party will be regiven and other
entertainment will be provided. All stu-
dents are invited.
U. of M. Rifle Club will meet Tues.,
Nov. 25 at 7:15 p.m. at the R.O.T.C.
Rifle Range.
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., 'Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Sterling thistle designed linked
bracelet, last Saturday, in or near
stadium. Keepsake. Reward. 6243S
Evenings. )56L
LOST - Field Glasses, Purdue game.
Reward. 3WH-4752. )57L_
LOST-Powder blue orlon sweater in
black bag in vicinity of State Street.
Call 3-8451 after 6 p.m. )58L
FOR SALE
2 END TABLES, contemporary wrought
iron and walnut designers' models:
reasonable mahoganybnwls and oil
painting. 9455, Mr. Hoffman. )2
STUDENTS-Up to % off on diamonds,
watches, rings, electric shaver, silver-
ware, appliances and all other jewelry
items. Any nationally advertised pro-
ducts at these savings. Ph. Ed Neback.
Lit. '53, 3-1713. )59
2 x 3 PACEMAKER speed graphicF
fully equipped, like new. Phone Henry
Arnold 3-4141. )40L
PARRAKEETS, babies and breeders, ca-1
naries, singers, cages and supplies. 305
W. Hoover. Phone 2-2403. )85
EVERGREENS
Plant till ground freezes hard.
Spreading & upright junpers 225, 7.50'
Spreading & upright yews 2.25, 3.25
Mugbo (dwarf Pine)........2.50, 4.50
Pyramidal & globe
Arbor Vitae ................2.50, 5.00
Call M. Lee 8574 or U. ext. 2410. )91
FOR SALE-1951 Anglia 35 mpg like
new. Call 3-3177 after 4 p.m. )98
GET YOUR official Michigan ring at
Burt Patts. 1209 S. University, phone
8889.197
MEN'S Gabardine dress pants $5.65.
Well tailored, assorted colors. Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington St. )99
CANARIES, beautiful singers and fe-
males. Also new and used bird cages.
Mrs. Ruffins, 562 S. 7th. )66
1931 MODEL A Fordor Ford. Runs well
and is in good condition. Phone
3MA-4343. )100
MARTIN CORONET, like new, with ac-
cessories and case, reasonable. Ph.
3-4440. .)101
$1,000 DOWN-Cozy 4 rooms and bath,
immediate possession. Ph. 2-6697. )102
I SOUTHERN Muskrat Coat size 14-16.
Excellent condition. Ph. 2-4014 after
4 p.m. 910 Green St. )103
GERMAN 35 m.m. camera. Many fea-
tures. Bargain price. Ph. 2-8754. )104
GRAY, genuine kidskin % fur coat. Call
Dexter 3DE-5501 after 3:30 p.m. )105
FOR RENT
GUEST HOUSE for rent. Three rooms
and a bath $60 month, water furnish-
ed. Call 8696 daytime and 2-4632
evenings. )6F
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR OVERNIGHT GUESTS-
Reserve rooms now at The Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State). Phone 3-8454. )2R
PERSONAL

HELP WANTED
PART TIME window trimmer wanted,
male preferred. Also can do other
work if desired. Wilkinson Luggage
Shop, 3-4013. )48H
SALES LADIES-Full or part time. Ap-
ply at Dixie Shops, 211 S. Main. Phone
3-2186.
MALE STUDENT for hose work, vac-
uuming, making beds, cleaning. Av-
erage 11 hours per week at $1 per
hour. Apply in person. Ferris, 706
Oakland, )106
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sale and service.
Morrill's
314 S. State St., Phone 7177. )8B
WASHING - Finished work, and hand
Ironing. Ruff dry and wet weshing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. );H
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & T.V.
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T.V.
"Student Service"
1215 So. Uni., Ph. 7942 F
1% blocks east of East Eng. 115B
ALTERATIONS-Ladies' coats shorten-
ed, alteration evening dresses, suits,
etc. Alta Graves, 2-2678. 510 Catherine
St. off N. State. )22B
GOOD Rental Typewriters available at
reasonable rates. Office Equipment
Company, 215 E. Liberty. Phone 2-1213.
)4B
MISCELLANEOUS
BEEN MEANING' to find out about our
student faculty and regular specials,
haven't you? Well, if you are not do-
ing anything why not inquire now.
Student Periodical Agency, 6007. )17M
TOPPER
Division and Liberty
Spaghetti and Meat Sauce
Served in the old Italian manner.
)19M
Weekdays, 6:30 to 11:30
Sat., Sun., 1:30 to 11:30
ADMISSION . .. 44c
STARTS TODAY
avCOOPER
1ULA4tiOl.YRY HIWAII,$tI
E Plus
@~ENE EELLY
pAG.. on a ild adventure
" PIERLNGELI
A girl in trouble!
MAKES V%
Added Cartoon
I "CANNED FEUD"

arelm gountet?
If so, heed film fancier
Otis L. Guernsey, Jr.
of the Herald Tribune,
Swho recommends
"Duvivier's latest gem,
-to satisfy the appetite
for better pictures"
SUPERLAT!,'E MINIATURES
ENHANCE THE PROGRAM
Read and Use Daily Classifieds

NOW!
- - - - - a

Shows
Continuous
From 1 P.M.

I

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!)

33rd Union Opera
""NO COVER CHARGE"
the
All1-Male;
Musical
Comedy4
DECEMBER 10, 11, 124
MICHIGAN THEATER
Mail Your Orders Now
PLENTY OF SEATS LEFT!
r- - ----..-...............-......-.......-..-..---..,
MICHIGAN UNION OPERA TICKETS I
Michigan Union, Ann Arbor, Mich. [
I Name
I (Please Print)
Address_
I (Please Print)
I tickets for December 10 11
(Circle One) I
2.25 1.75 1.25 Balcony, Main Floor
(Circle One) (Circle One)
f SOLD OUT-Friday, ALL seats-Thursday, $1.75 seats.
0 Checks payable to Michigan Union Opera.
* All orders must have self-addressed stamped envelopes
---enclosed.

LISTEN to Meader discuss the GOP
program. The Union today at 3 P.M.
) 33P
HELP WANTED
WANTED - Experienced salesman for,
part time help. Must be here for
Xmas. A. A. Cut Rate. 113 So. Main.
)39H
MARCHOf!MM"

ADDED
BARNEY BEAR in SPECIALTY
"BUSYBODY BEAR" NEWS

I
3
I

TODAY

..4.

Continuous
From 1 P.M.
Adults 65c

JANUR Y 23

Fm

Iq

RAU.
N PIANIST
Program
FANTASY, D minor
MOZART
SONATA, Op. 81
BEETHOVEN
SONATA, Op. 57
BEETHOVEN
FANTASY, C major
SCHUMANN
HILL AUDITORIUM

I

Cinema SL aI4

LAST TIME TONIGHT
(Sunday) at 8:00 P.M. Only
Feature at 8:10

TUES., NOV. 25, 8:30-

"A sight to.see-a grand movie."--N.Y. Times
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