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November 21, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-11-21

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIMEE

I U

i

SPORTS SLANTS,
. ..By Ed Whipple

I'

TBETTER HADN'T SNOW. Anything else can happen (and prob-
ably will), but it better not snow tomorrow. Because it snowed two
years ago, and one such experience is plenty for even a St. Bernard
in red flannels. Ask anyone who was there.
As numbed Michigan supporters struggled up to the Ohio Stadium
through that blizzard, the gate keeper didn't bother to collect ticket
stubs. "Ho, ho," he choked between blasts of snow. "There ain't gonna
be any football game here today."
Actually there was no sense to staying, because if Illinois beat
Northwestern, the Illini would have the championship and a Rose
Bowl trip no matter what happened in Columbus. What's more, the
Wildcats weren't conceded a chance.
But in went the fans anyway. The least uncomfortable person
in the Stadium was the ingenious guy who wore a long cardboard
box over his head. He navigated by a tiny slit in front. The rest of
the 50,000 who eventually straggled in sat shivering like a tribe of
'monkeys in an an ice house.
And there was a football game, in spite of periodic expeditions
by managers up and down the sidelines to sweep the snow off the
yardlines and outside boundaries. It was really FOOT-ball, too. Ohio's
Vic Janowicz and Michigan's Chuck Ortmann punted 45 times be-
tween them-a Conference record.
Snow and Roses ...
THE WOLVERINES' Tony Momsen blocked one punt for a safety
and another for a touchdown. Michigan won, 9-3, without com-
pleting a pass or making a first down. The Wolverines gained 27 yards
rushing.
But the biggest phenomenon was the announcement of Northwest-
ern's 14-7 defeat of Illinois. The impossible had happened. Bennie
} Oosterbaan's team had come from rags to riches-from snow bowl to
Rose Bowl, and won the undisputed Conference championship to boot.
And if the cast will only follow its script, the stage is set to-
morrow for a repeat of that performance the Big Ten put on two
Novembers ago. Only this time Minnesota has to upset Wisconsin
while Michigan beats Ohio State in order for the Wolverines to win
the title all alone.
How close can a league race get? Michigan and Wisconsin are tied
for the Big Ten lead with four victories and one defeat. Yet if either
loses tomorrow it will probably wind up fourth in the final standings.
I Minnesota has only a loss and a half (tie counts half game won, half
lost), as does Purdue. Ohio State has lost twice, but the Bucks play
seven Conference games. Hence they can move ahead of the Wol-
verines by winning.
Tough Decision.. .
. TO MAKE IT tighter still, statistics show that Michigan is first
defensively in Conference games and third on offense. Wisconsin
is first on offense, and third on defense. And who ranks second in
both offense and defense? None other than the pesky Buckeyes, al-
though they're fifth in the standings.
No wonder Big Ten athletic directors are wishing for an un-
disputed champ. If Michigan and Wisconsin tie for the title, it's any-
body's guess who will get the Rose Bowl bid. The athletic directors
will vote, regardless of what happens tomorrow, and the results will
be out at noon (CST) Monday. If there is not tie, the vote is a mere
formality.
If there's a deadlock, the procedure of listing "the three most
representative teams" in order will tell the story. That result de.
pends wholly on what happens tomorrow in'Columbus, Madison,
and Los Angeles, where UCLA and Southern California, both
unbeaten, clash for the Pacific Coast Conference title.
No one around Ferry Field will publicly give out with any ideas
on the Rose Bowl. Said Oosterbaan, "We're just trying to win a foot-
ball game."I
But the stage is set, and anything can happen. Only it better
hadn't snow.
Sauer Gets National League's
uMost Valuable Player Award

'M', Badgers
Top Big Ten
In Statistics
Ameche, Kress
Rushing Leaders
Michigan and Wisconsin, tied
for the Big Ten lead, head into
Saturday's vital contests as the
Conference leaders in defense and
offense respectively.
The Badgers, aside from being
tops in total yardage, first downs,
and points also have the League's
rushing leader in Alan Ameche.
The Wisconsin fullback has gained
close to five yards per try in the
process of running for a total of
596 yards during the season.
AMECHE LEADS Michigan's
Ted Kress by 150 yards although
the Wolverine junior has averaged
more yards per carry. Kress is also
third in total offense behind Mlini
Tommy O'Connell and Dick
Thomas of Northwestern.
In the passing department,
Dale Samuels, Purdue's ace is
currently top ranked, having
completed better than 60 per-
cent of his attempts. Right be-
hind Samuels is O'Connell, who
has gained the most yardage via
the air route, 1138.,
The passer in third place will be
of interest to Michigan fans as he
is Ohio State's top notch quarter-
back, John Borton. Borton, who
will have to be stopped by the
Maize and Blue if Michigan is to
have a chance for the Rose Bowl,
is also fourth in total offense, a
scant four yards behind Ted Kress.
* * *
THE BEST that Michigan has
in the passing department is
Kress, only rated seventh despite
the fact that he has completed
53 of his tosses.
Michigan has permitted but
11.8 points per conference con-
test to rate as the best defensive
outfit in the Big Ten. The Wol-
verines have permitted the few-
est yards per try in both rush-
ing and passing in spite of the
fact that they are supposed to
have a poor pass defense.
In Ohio State, however, Bennie
Oosterbaan's eleven will be meet-
ing the best balanced team in the
Conference, statistically speaking
at least. The Buckeyes are second
both offensively and defensively
even though they are in fifth place
in the league standings.
IN PREPARATION for the im-
portant meeting with the Buckeyes
at Columbus, Michigan ran
through its final full scale drill
of the regular season. After a long
defensive session, Coach Benny
Oosterbaan ordered non-contact
signal drills to put a final polish on
the Wolverines precision and tim-
ing.
The forty-man traveling squad
will leave Ann Arbor today at
four p.m., traveling to Toledo
where it will spend the night. The
team will entrain for Columbus
Saturday morning and arrive at
the Buckeye stadium just before
game time.
LAST DAY
Pan Hellenic Ball
pictures on display
Michigan League
10-2 1-5

IT'S DON DUGGER VS. DEAN DUGGER ON SATURDAY
GRID SELECTIONS
GAMES OF THE WEEK
Consensus Selections (80-34) Appear in Capitals

By DAVE LIVINGSTON
"Don Dugger is too smallto ever
play Big Ten football."
That's what the Ohio State
coaching staff thought four years
ago, so Don came to Michigan.
But when the cleats stop pound-
ing tomorrow afternoon in Col-
umbus it's a pretty sure bet that
no matter who wins, Buckeye
coach Woody Hayes will wish he
had had two Duggers in his line,
instead of one.
FOR, WHILE sophomore Dean
Dugger is now holding down a
spot at end for the Bucks his
older brother has become one of
the most respected linemen in the
conference.
The scrappy Wolverine guard
anchors the center of a Michi-
gan forward wall that ranks with
the best defensive units in the
country.
At 180 pounds, 5' 10", Don is
comparatively small for a line-
man in these days of hulking 200-
pounders.
BUT THE Michigan senior
makes up for his "diminutive" size
with a drive and determination
that has won him this season the
plaudits of such grid mentors as
Ray Eliot of Illinois and Cornell
coach Lefty James.
Football comes naturally to
the Buckeye and Wolverine Dug-
gers. Their older brother, Jack,
was no less than an. All-Ameri-
can as an end at Ohio State in
1944, going on to play pro-ball
with the Detroit Lions and Chi-
cago Bears,
Buckeyes Jack and Dean are
both well over six feet tall and
just as far over 200 pounds, so
that Don has to look up to both
of them-everywhere but on the
gridiron, that is.

LAST WEEK the Wolverine
sparkplug played a big part in
keeping Michigan's Big Ten title
chances alive.
With Purdue leading the
Maize and Blue 7-0 in the first
quarter and threatening again
on the Wolverine 16 yard line,
Dugger crashed through the
line and smeared quarterback
Dale Samuels for a nine yard
loss before he could get one of
his deadly passes away.
From that moment the Boiler-
maker offense stalled after they
were forced to settle for a field
goal on that drive.
* * *
BROTHER DEAN warmed up
for tomorrow's vital clash by scor-
ing the first two touchdowns of
his collegiate career against Illi-
nois last Saturday. He nabbed
scoring tosses of six and 37 yards
from Buckeye hurler John Borton.
The OSU outcast, Don, got his
big chance as a Wolverine last
year when Dick Beison was in-
jured in the fourth game of the

FAMILY FEUD:
Dugger Brothers To Clash Tomorrow

season. Dugger took over his
guard spot and has been a reg-
ular ever since.
Last spring he was runner-up
for the Meyer J. Morton trophy,
wan by Gene Knutson, which is
awarded to the most improved
player in spring practice.
IN NIGH SCHOOL Dugger won
letters at center his freshman and
sophomore years at Lima Central,
in Ohio. His last couple years he
held a tackle position for Stone-
wall Jackson High in Charleston,
W. Va., where Dean was a team-
mate as a freshman and sopho-
more.
Tomorrow afternoon, the Dug-
ger brothers will be glaring at each
other from opposite sides of the
line. Don's fondest hope (next to
whipping the Buckeyes, of course,)
is for Dean to run an "end-around"
play, so he can show him how
they tackle at Michigan.
There's one Dugger that didn't
go to Ohio State, but Buckeye
partisans will know he's around
this Saturday.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

MICHIGAN at Ohio State
Southern Cal at UCLA
KANSAS at Missouri
Indiana at PURDUE
Marquette at MSC
Brown at COLUMBIA
Kentucky at TENNESSEE
15. Alabama

8. WISCONSIN at Minnesota
9. TEXAS CHRISTIAN at Rice
10. Northwestern at ILLINOIS
11. NOTRE DAME at Iowa
12. Baylor at SMU
13. Clemson at AUBURN
14. Penn State at PITTSBURGH
at MARYLAND

SELECTIONS
PAUL GREENBERG (85-29-.746)-Michigan, UCLA, Kansas, Purdue,
MSC, Columbia, Tennessee, Minnesota, TCU, Illinois, Notre Dame,
SMU, Clemson, Pitt, Maryland.
ED SMITH (79-35-.693)-Michigan, UCLA, Missouri, Purdue, MSC,
Columbia, Tennessee, Minnesota, TCU, Illinois, Notre Dame, SMU,
Clemson, Pitt, Maryland.
IVAN KAYE (78-36-.684)--Michigan, UCLA, Kansas, Purdue, MSG,
Columbia, Tennessee, Wisconsin, TCU, Illinois, Notre Dame,
SMU, Auburn, Pitt, Maryland.
JOHN JENKS (77-37-.675)-Michigan, USC, Kansas, Purdue, MSC,
Columbia, Tennessee, Wisconsin, TCU, Illinois, Notre Dame, SMU,
Auburn, Pitt, Alabama.
ED WHIPPLE (77-37-.675)-Mchigan, UCLA, Kansas, Indiana, MSC,
Columbia, Kentucky, Wisconsin, TCU, Illinois, Notre Dame, SMU,
Auburn, Pitt, Maryland.
BOB MARGOLIN (74-40-.649)-Michigan, UCLA, Kansas, Purdue,
MSC,.Columbia, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Rice, Illinois, Notre Dame,
Baylor, Clemson, Pitt, Maryland.
DICK BUCK (19-10-.655)--Michigan, USC, Kansas, Purdue, MSC,
Columbia, Tennessee, Wisconsin, TCU, Illinois, Notre Dame, SMU,
Auburn, Pitt, Maryland.
DICK SEWELL (73-41-.640)--Michigan, USC, Kansas, Purdue, MSC,
Columbia, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Rice, Illinois, Notre Dame, SMU,
Auburn, Pitt, Maryland.
DICK LEWIS (71-43-.623)-Michigan, USC, Kansas, Purdue, MSC,
Columbia, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Rice, Illinois, Iowa, Baylor,
Auburn, Penn State, Maryland.
DAVE LIVINGSTON (18-11-.621)-Michigan, UCLA, Kansas, Purdue,
MSC, Columbia, Tennessee, Minnesota, Rice, Illinois, Notre Dame,
SMU, Auburn, Pitt, Maryland.

PU......E
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I

Intramural Scoreboard

VOLLEYBALL
Political Science 6, Astronomy 0
Dental Lab 6, Physics 0
Education 6, Psychology "B" 0
Phi Delta Phi 5, Phi Chii 1
Delta Sigma Delta 6, Air Force 0
M.C.F. 5, Wesleyans 1
Phi Alpha Delta 5, Alpha Kappa
Kappa 1
Phi Delta Chi won over Phi Delta Ep-
silon (forfeit)
Law Club 6, Alpha Omega 0

Nu Sigma Nu 5,Phi Alpha Kappa 1
Phi Epsilon Kappa 5, Tau Epsilon
Rho 1
L.S.&A. 6, Roger Williams 0
Canterbury 4, Wesleyan 2
HANDBALL
Sigma Chi won over Delta Kappa Ep-
silon (forfeit)
Delta Tau Delta won over Alpha Delta
Phi (forfeit)
Alpha Sigma Phi 3, Theta Chi 0

r'

/ 'I ,
/ ! /
)
K

MADE BY
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grains, cordovans or calfskins in wing-
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Won't you call and see these outstand-
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4

NEW YORK -- (P) - Slugger
Hank Sauer of the Chicago Cubs
was voted most valuable player in
the National League yesterday in a
photo finish with Robin Roberts
of the Philadelphia Phillies and
Joe Black of the Brooklyn Dodg-
ers.
The long ball won for Ham-
merin' Hank whose total of 37
home runs and 121 runs batted in
offset his .270 batting average.
Despite a disastrous September
a slump, Sauer's slugging feats were
judged more valuable to the Cubs
than Roberts' job of winning 28
games for the Phils and Black's
brilliant relief work for the pen-
nant-winning Dodgers.
IN FACT, it was the first time
since 1938 that the most valuable

players in both leagues came from
teams that did not win the pen-
nant. Bobby Shantz of the Phila-
delphia A's was named the Amer-
ican's MVP winner last week.
It was a tight fit among the
three leaders in the National in
both first place votes from the
24-man committee of the Base-
ball Writers Association and the
point total.
Sauer eked out a 15-point mar-
gin with 226 points, to Roberts'
211 and Black's 208.

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