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September 23, 1952 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1952-09-23

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GE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 11W

~~~E~ TWOTUSDY-SETEBE--,-~

DAILY

OFFICIAL BULLETIN

D1EE1

'V

I I

.The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 195
VOL. LXIII, No. 1
Notices
Users of the Daily Official Bulletin;
Need of conserving space makes
necessary the following announce-
ments: (1) Notices of meetings or or-
ganizations will be restricted to the
name of the organization concerned,
day, time, and place of meeting, and
name of speaker and subject. (2) No-
tices for the D.O.B. are not accepted
over the telephone but must be sub-
mitted in typewritten form and double-
spaced for editorial convenience.
tThe Editor is obliged to warn users of
the Bulletin that no notice will be
printed more than twice, and the Edi-
tor expects to use his own judgment in
reducing unreasonably long notices to
reasonable length.
Frank E. Robbins
Assistant to the President
Choral Union Ushers: Last years ush-
ers may register at Hill Auditorium box
office between 5 and 6 p.m., toaay.
Choral Union Tryouts.
The University Choral Union is now
being organized. New candidates for
membership will please make audition
appointments at once at the offices
of the University Musical Society in
Burton Memorial Tower, either in per-
son or by telephone. A few vacancies
in each section remain Lo be filled.
Last year's members will be admitted
without auditions, provided they reg-
ister promptly before the lists are
closed.
The Choral Union participates each
year in the two performances of Han-
del's "Messiah" in December, under
Conductor Lester McCoy; and also in
two May Festival concerts with the
Philadelphia Orchetra under Thor
Johnson.
Members are issued courtesy passes
tp the ten concerts in the Choral Union
Series and to the May Festival per-
formances.
Concert Tickets. Season tickets for
the Choral Union Series, at $15.00, $1200
and $10.00; and for the Extra Concert
Series, at $7.50, $6.00 and 5.00, are on
sale at the offices of the University
Musical Society in Burton Memorial
Tower.
Tickets for single concerts in both
series will go on sale beginning Wednes-
cay morning, Sept. 24, at 9~ o'clock, at
$2.50, $2.00 and $1.50 each (except for
the Boston Symphony, which are
priced at $3.00, $2.50, $2.00 and $1.50).
In the Choral Union Series, the fol-
lowing concerts will be given: Richard
Tucker, Oct. 8; Yehudi Menuhin, Oct.
22; Danish National Orchestra, Nov.
13; Vladimir Horowitz, Nov. 19; Bidu
Playing through Saturday

Sayao, Dec. 1; Vienna Choir Boys, Jan.
16; Minneapolis Symphony, Feb. 12;
Gershwin Concert Orchestra, Mar. 2;
Arthur Rubinstein, Mar. 12; and the
Boston Symphony Orchestra, May 19.
In the Extra Concert Series the fol-
lowing will be heard: Rise Stevens, Oct.
17; Cleveland Orchestra, Nov. 9; Claud-
io Arrau, Nov. 25; Heifetz, Feb. 17;
Boston "Pops" Tour Orchestra, Mar. 23.
1952-53 Lecture Course Tickets Now
on Sale. Seven outstanding attractions
will be offered this year by the Orator-
ical Association and season tickets af-
ford a substantial saving. The followv-
ing distinguished celebrities are sched-
uled: Drew Pearson, famous columnist,
Oct. 15; The Drama Quartette, starring
CharlesdBoyer, Charles Lauwghton, Ced-
ric Hardwicke and Agnes Mooreheai in
"Don Juan In Hell," Nov. 5; World Af-
fairs Today, panel of international
speakers from France, Turkey, Philip-
pines and United States, Nov. 20; Sen-
ator Paul Douglas and Congressman
Walter Judd in discussion "Our Foreign
Policy, Right or Wrong?" Jan 14; Em-
lyn Williams, English actor, in unique
theatrical performance "Charles Dick-
ens," Feb. 16; James B. Reston, noted
Journalist, March 9; Ogden Nash, cel-
ebrated writer of light verse, March 19.
Students and their wives are granted
a special rate for the full course, sec-
ond balcony, unreserved, $2.50. Tickets
may be purchased at Hill Auditorium
box office daily from 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
STANDARDS OF CONDUCT
Enrollment in the University carries
with it obligations in regard to con-
duct, not only inside but also outside
the classroom, and students are expected
to conduct themselves in such a man-
ner as to be a credit both to themselves
and the the University. They are amen-
able to the laws governing the commu-
nity as well as to the rules and orders
of the University and University of-
ficials, and they are expected to observe
the standards of conduct approved by
the University.'
Whenever a student, group of stu-
dents, society, fraternity, or other stu-
dent organization fails to observe ei-
ther the general standards of conduct
as above outlined or any specific rules
which may be adopted by the proper
University authorities, or conducts him-
self or itself in such a manner as to
make it apparent that he or it is not
a desirable member or part of the Uni-
versity, he or it shall be liable to disci-
plinary action by the proper University
authorities. ("Bylaws," Sec. 8.03.) Spe-
cific rulesrof conduct which must be
observed are:
Women Guests in Men's Residences:
The presence of women guests in men's
residences, except for exchange and
guest dinners or for social events or
during calling hours approved by the
Office of Staudent Affairs, is not per-
mitted. This regulation does not ap-
ply to mothers of residents. (Commit-
tee on Student Conduct, January 28,
1947).
(Exchange and guest dinners. Ex-
change dinners are defined as meals in
men's residences or women's residences
attended by representative groups of
members of approved organizations of
the other sex. Guest dinners are de-
fined as meals in men's residences and
women's residences attended by guests
who may or may not belong to Uni-
versity organizations. Exchange and
guest dinners may be held in orga-
nized student residences between 5:30
p.m. and 8 p.m. for week-day dinners
and between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. for Sun-
day dinners. (Committee on Student
Conduct, January 28, 1947.) While
guest chaperons are not required,
groups without resident house direc-
tors must announce these events to
the Office of Student Affairs at least
one day in advance of the scheduled
date.)
(Calling Hours for Women in Men's
Residences. In University men's resi-
dence halls, daily between 3 p.m. and
10:30 p.m. In Nelson International
House, Psi Upsilon, Alpha Tau Omega,
and Sigma Phi Epsilon Friday from 8
p.m. to 12 p.m.: on Saturday from 2:30
p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and from 9 p.m. to 12
p.m.; Sunday from 1 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.
It is expected that the resident house
director will be present during these
hours. This privilage applies only to
casual calls and not to planned parties,

which must be submitted for approval
to the Office of Student Affairs. Wom-
en callers in men's residences will be
restricted to the main floor of the resi-
dence.)
Intoxicating Beverages. The use or
presence of intoxicating beverages in
student quarters is not permitted.
(Committee on Student Conduct, July
2, 1947.) See Appendix C for Michigan
Compiled Laws and Ordinances of the
City of Ann Arbor.
0
Concerted Absence. Concerted absence
from any appointed duty by a class or
by any number of students together
will be regarded as improper conduct,
and those participating in such action
shall be liable to disciplinary action by
the proper University authorities. ("By-
laws," Sec. 8.04.)
Financial Obligations. Proper observ-
ance of;financial obligations is deemed
an essential of good conduct, and stu-
dents who are guilty of laxness in this
regard to a degree incompatible with
the genehral standards of conduct as
set forth in Section 8.03 (p. 29) shall
be liable to disciplinary action by the
proper University authorities.
Students shall pay all accounts due
the University not later than the last
day of classes of each semester or sum-
mer session. Any unpaid accounts at
the close of business on the last day of
classes shall be reported to the Cashier
of the University and the following
action shall be taken: (1) all academic
credits shall be withheld, (2) grades
for the semester or summer session just
completed shall not be released, (3) no
transcript of credits shall be issued, and
(4) students owing such accounts shall
not be allowed to register in any sub-
sequent semester or summer session un-
til payment has been made. University
authorities may request the withdraw-
al of any student who through over-
sight has been allowed to register con-
trary to this regulation. ("Bylaws,"
Sec. 8.06)
Amounts due for room or board in
residence halls shall be deemed ac-
counts due the University. ("Bylaws,"
Sec. 29.10.)
Whenever in the opinion of the Dean
of Students a case warrants it, like ac-
tion shall be taken in the case of non-
payment of rent properly chargeable
for living accommodations for the se-
mester in an approved rooming house.
Student loans which fall due during
any semester or summer session and
which are not paid or renewed are sub-
ject to this regulation, but loans not
yet due are not included. (Bylaws,"
Sec. 8.06.)
Responsibility for Maintaining Stan-
dards of Conduct. Student organizations
are expected to take all reasonable
measures to promote among their mem-
bers conduct consistent with good taste
and to endeavor by all reasonable means
to ensure conformity with the forego-
ing standards of conduct
University students or student orga-
nizations are responsible for their
guests' compliance with the standards
of conduct. (Dean of Students.)
Any student-sponsored function at
which conditions arise that are in-
jurious to the prestige of the University
may be abolished by the Committee on
Student Affairs. (Regents' Proceedings,,
May, 1923.)
It Is the joint responsibility of the
chaperons and the president of the or-
ganization sponsoring a social event to
see that University regulations are ob-
served, particularly those relating to
conduct, presence of women guests, and
use of intoxicants. (Committee on Stu-
dent Affairs, November 13, 1946.)
Penalties. Except as otherwise herein
provided, penalties for violation of
standards of conduct may be in the
form of expulsion, suspension, proba-
tion, withdrawal of special privileges,
imposition of special duties, imposition
of extra hours of required credit, re-
duction of hours of credit, imposition
of monetary fines which shall be
deemed proper in a particular case.
Failure to comply with the discipli-
nary order of any disciplinary authori-
ty shall result in suspension until com-
pliance. ("Bylaws," Sec. 8:.14.)
Social Events sponsored by student
organizations at which both men and
women are to be present must be reg-
istered in the Office of Student Af-

fairs, and are subject to approval by
the Dean of Students. Application
forms and a copy of regulations govern-
ing these events may be secured in
the Office of Student Affairs, 1020 Ad-
ministration Building. Requests for ap-
proval must be submitted to that of-
fice no later than noon of the Monday
before the event is scheduled. A list of
approved social events will be published
in the Daily Official Bulletin on
Wednesday of each week.
In planning social programs for the
semester, social chairmen will want to
keep in mind the action of the Com-
mittee on Student Affairs which re-
quires that the calendar be kept clear
of student sponsored activities for the
ten days prior to a final examination
period. Final examinations for the
present semester begin Januaryr19.
Social Chairmen. Open houses before
and after home football games are au-
thorized in organized student residences
on the Saturday of the game between
11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. for pre-game
functions and between 5 p.m. and 7
p.m. for post-game functions. Regis-
tration of these functions is not re-
quired provided they are confined to
the hours indiciated.
Lectures
Freshman Health Lectures for Men.
It is a University requirement that all
entering freshmen, attend a series of
lectures on Personal and Community
Health and pass an examination on
the content of these lectures. Trans-
fer students with freshman standing
are also required to take the course un-
less they have had a similar course
elsewhere, which has been accredited
here.
Upperclassmen who were here as
freshmen and who did not fulfill tne
requirements are requested to do so
this term.
The lectures will be given in Natural
Science Auditorium at 3, 4, 5, and 7:30
p.m. as per the following schedule:
Lecture No. Day Date
1 Mon. Sept. 22
2 Tues. Sept. 23
Wed. Sept. 24
4 Thurs. Sept. 25
5 Mon. Sept. 29
6 Tues. Sept. 30
.7
(Final Exam) Wed. Oct. 1
You may attend at either of the
above hours. Enrollment will take place
at the first lecture. Please note that
attendance is required.
Academic Notices
Sports and Dance Instruction for
Women. Womenastudents who have
completed their physical education re-
quirement may register as electives in
physical education classes on Tuesday
and Wednesday mornings, Sept. 23 and
24 in Barbour Gymnasium.
The University Extension Service an-
nounces that its fall program of evening
classes for adults is opening this week.
Registration may be made between 6:30
and 9:45 p.m. Monday through Thurs-
day, this week and next, in 165 School.
of Business Administration.
The following classes meet tonight:.
Social Forces in Human Behavior.
This new sixteen-week course is de-
signed to provide an understanding of
man's nature and social behavior. It
will deal with the interaction between
man and the physical world in which
he lives. The dependence of each hu-

man being-upon others for his survival
will be considered in regard to the for-
mation of patterns of behavior, thought,
a social group. Lecturers from the de-
and feeling which unify all members of
partments of psychology, anthropolo-
gy, and sociology will integrate ma-
terial from these three disciplines into
a single approach to the problems of
understanding man and the soclo-cul-
tural forces that affect his behavior.
Lecutrers will be Prof. Amos T. Haw-
ley (sociology), Prof. Wilbert J. Mc-
Keachie (psychology), Prof. Theodore
M. Newcomb (social psychology), Mil-
ton J. Rosenberg (psychology), Prof.
Guy E. Swanson (sociology), and Prof.
Mischa Titiev (anthropology). 7:30
p.m. 170 Business Administration Build-
ing. $18.00.
Ceramics. Advanced course on the
materials and forms of pottery. Basic
ceramic designs applied to the potter's
wheel and uses of glazes. Designed for
students who have had some previous
work in ceramics. Class limited to 20.
J. T. Abernathy is the instructor. 7:30
p.m. 125 Architecture Building. Sixteen
weeks, $18.00.
Machining II-Manufacturing Equip-
ment and Processes. (Production Engi-
neering 131, two hours credit). Design,
operation, and use of machine tools,
jigs, and fixtures, dies, cutting tools,
and other accessories as applied to the
job shop, semiproduction and mass pro-
duction processes; relation between de-
sign of product, metal, and fabricat-
ing process. Fits, surface quality, end
production costs; routings, cutting
tools, machinability, and speeds and
feeds. One three-hour period of lec-
tures, recitations, and problems on
Tuesday, and one three-hour labora-
tory period on Thursday each week.
Prof. William W. Gilbert, Tuesdays, 7:00
p.m. 1042 East Engineering Building.
Prof. Robert E. McKee, Thursdays, 1304
East Engineering Building, Sixteen
weeks, $48.00.
Political Geography (Geography 135,
two hours credit). Prof. George Kish
will present this course on present-day
problems of political geography, with
particular emphasis on the great pow-
ers of our time and on areas of politi-
cal conflict in the world. 7:30 p.m. 176
Business Administration Building. Six-
teen weeks, $18.00.
General Semantics Scientific Living.
In this eight-week course, Dr. Clarence
L. Meader, professor emeritus of gen-
eral linguistics, will discuss the fun-
damentals of the science of meaning,
with special reference to the meaning of
words as a guide to successful living;
sane thinking and sane conduct. Appli-
cations of general semantics to the so-
lution of personal and social problems.
Lectures, demonstrations, and discus-
sions. 7:00 p.n. 717 Business Adminis-
tration Building. $6.00.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24.1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2 84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday Is 3 P.M., Saturdovs,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
FOR SALE
LEICA IIIC with F2 Summitar. Like new
$250.00. Ph. 5948 evenings. )6
MEN'S ENGLISH BIKE-$25. Inquire
1008 Natural Science. )7
'38 DODGE-Good motor, 5 tires, insured
$75. Univ. ext. 2142. B. Singer. )8
EVERGREENS
Spreading Juniper (3 kinds) $2.25-$7.50
Upright Juniper (3 kinds) $1.95-$5.00
Pyramidal Arborvitae ....$2.00-$5.00
Common Arborvitae (5-7 ft.) ....$2.50
Mugho (Dwarf) Pine .......$2.00-$4.50
Scotch Pine (4-7 ft.) Youdig ....$1.95
Samples at 1422 Wash. Hts. Call
Michael Lee, 8574. )3
1940 Oldsmobile - 1947 motor, $140.00.
Body rough, no motor trouble. Radio,
heater, Call 5996 noon or evenings. )4
2 END TABLES, contemporary wrought
iron and walnut designers' models;
reasonable mahogany bowls and oil
painting. 9455, Mr. Hoffman. )2
MAGS
at special student rates for the entire
school year.
Colliers........................$3.35
Etude..........................2.50
Esquire.4.50
Ladies Home Journal ............ 2.00
Life ........... .................3.00
Time...........................2.00
Saturday Evening Post .......... 3.50
Just phone your order to 6007 or write
Student Periodical Agency, Box 2006.
Credit extended; act today. )5

FOR SALE

HELP WANTED

1947 CROSLEY - Good condition, $85. sMAKE $20.00 DAILY - Sell luminous
Phone 2-8975 after six. )1 n me plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
boro, Mass. Free sample and details,
ROOMS FOR RENT ,)3H
FOOTBALL weekend guest rooms avail- PART TIME store clerk for men's wear
able. Student Room Bureau. Phone and shoe store. Experience preferred.
Don Tewes, 3-8454 8 a.m.-11 p.m. )3R Good wages. Inquireinperson. Sam's
- - Store, 122 E. Washington. )4H

2 ROOM furnished apt. for 2 students.
Complete kitchen, private entrance,
share bath, $55. Ph. 3-1784. )4R
PLEASANT single room for student.
Call5728. >5R

WANTED - Part time help in flower
shop. Some experience preferred.
Must be available during Christmas
and Easter holidays. Apply-Good
news, 225 E. Liberty. )5H

ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS-
Reserve rooms now at The Campus BABY SITTER in exchange for dinner
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near laundry privileges, quiet study. Three
State). Phone 3-8454. )2R evenings per week. Phone 2-7474. )2H
COMFORTABLE SUITE for two men. YOUNG MAN for part time work. Stock-
Prefer graduate students. Call after room and delivery. Apply employment
5:30 p.m., 1402 Hill. )1R office, main street store, Goodyears.
)lH

PERSONAL
TIME
is offered to students at the amazing
copy price of 6c cheaper than your
city newspaper. Phone in your order
for the school year ($2) to Student
Periodical, 6007. )1P
TRANSPORTATION
GRAD STUDENT DRIVING TO CALI-
FORNIA week of October 5. Passengers
wanted to share driving and expense.
Call 25-9194. )3T
WANTED-Ride from Lansing to Ann
Arbor on Monday mornings to arrive
at 8 a.m. Phone Bill Joy at 2-9318. )2T
WANTED-Ride from Plymouth to Anr
Arbor on Mon., Wed., and Fri. around
8 o'clock. Phone University Ext.'2583.
)lT

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING WANTED - Rates reasonable,
prompt service. Phone 3449. Mrs. Ida
L. Vaughn, 914 Mary Street. ')2B
ALTERATIONS - Latest garments,
prompt service. Call 2-2678. Katherine
St., near State. )lB
MISCELLANEOUS
BOARDERS WANTED-Good food, rea-
sonable rates. Close to campus. Call
Bill Kempf, 2-0549. )3M
PIANO practice room needed. Will dis-
cuss rates. Barbara Pfeffer, Ph. 3-0715.
)2M
PLAYTIME CARE OF CHILDREN
in my home. Educational toys, play-
ground equipment. Sat. also. Phone
3-1037. )IM

"Easy-Does-It
ONE-STI

OP

Events Today
Wolverine Club. Open meeting,
p.m., Union. Everyone invited.

1
'I :JO

READ
and
USE
Daily
Classifieds

LAUNDRY SERVICE
t Easy on you
.440Easy on your time
0 Easy on your pocket book
t-O Easy on your daintiest washables
30 New Maytag Automatic Washers-5 Large Dryers

Finished
SHIRT SERVICE
48-hour serYice

DRY CLEANING
10% Discount

},

J-Hop committee meeting, Rm. 3B,
Union, 7 p.m.
Square Dance Group meets at Lane
Hall, 7:30 p.m. All students welcome.
Coming Events
First Baptist Church. Family Supper,
Wed., Sept. 24, 6:15 p.m. All Baptist stu-
dents will be guests of the church con-
gregation.

,!

Open Evenings For Your Convenience
eackav'd SERVICE /auh4 f

ill

j 715 Packard (near State)

Phone 2-4241

I

m

17

r

-TT!=

Li

A MESSAGE TO
MICHIGAN DAILY SUPPORTERS
For your painting needs come to the
ANDERSON PAINT CO.
formerly Pontiac Varnish Co.
We would deem it a pleasure to serve you.
Open daily including Sat. 7:30 to 5:30.
Parking Lot

U

Presents

1I

MY

MAN

300 E. Washington

Phone 2-1350

1111

-

GODFREY

I

I

Daily from
1:30 P.M.

Daily
from
1 P.M.

-ALSO-
* CARTOON
SPORTS

,orPheuol "NEMp

Films From
All Nations
Admission 50c,

"Beautiful
Jean Renc
haunting r

'

I.

COOL

COOL

beyond words! JEAN RENOIR'S "A rare and en-
ir has filmed a chanting film! ,
everie!" MOTION PICTURE brilliant!"
--N.Y. Times MASTERPIECE -Her.-Tribune
THE 1ANKS OF THE GANfA$!
. ! .. rwV1 ",ti..
~x'-~:~::~. I tIN

NIGHTS & SUNDAY-65c
DAILY MATINEES - 44c
Ends Tonight
' JOAN
CRAWFORD
"SUDDEN FEAr'
WED. THRU FRIDAY
NTENATIONAL
?'TURE
Maureen O'SULLIVAN " Edmund GWENN

:
r
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: :

Freshman Medical

Students

Welcome

I

A CELEBRITY SERIES OF DISTINCTION
Dramatic Entertainment - Informative Discussions
Timely Topics - Dynamic Speakers
* OCT. 15-DREW PEARSON
"Washington Merry-Go-Round"
* NOV. 5-THE DRAMA QUARTETTE
Charles Boyer, Charles Laughton,
Cedric Hardwicke, Agnes Moorehead
"Don Juan In Hell"
* NOV. 20-WORLD AFFAIRS TODAY
Panel: Chautemps, France; Dosdogru, Turkey;
Aquino, Philippines; Metcalfe, U.S.A.
* JAN. 14-SEN. PAUL DOUGLAS and
CONG. WALTER H. JUDD
Discussion: "Our Foreign Policy, Right or Wrong?"
* FEB. 16-EMLYN WILLIAMS
Unique Theatrical Performance as Charles Dickens
* MARCH 9-JAMES B. RESTON
"Reston Views The News"
O MARCH 19-OGDEN NASH
"An Evening With Ogden Nash"
Season Tickets: $7.50 (Main Floor) - $6.50 (First Balc.)

I

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6e

rrm

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Register with us and
receive a useful gift -
Medical Pen Light.

I

WELCOME MUSIC STUDENTS

I

For your SHEET MUSIC and

I

THE QUARRY

t1
SPECIAL STUDENT RATE ;
/q #4 ,n c tin f TL,,;.. A /.,k.

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