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November 02, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-11-02

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' THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

O'Connell's Passing Paces Illini' s Offensive

Attack

4

. s *

* * «

* * *

* * * *

'M' Surges in Last Half;
Kress Paces Vain Rally

Michigan Locker Room
Silent A fter Upset Loss
Illinois Coach Ray Eliot Praises Michigan
Tailback Ted Kress as Exceptional Runner

C+?

(Continued from Page 1)
verine Captain Tim Green pounceda
on it.
A penalty set Michigan back toj
the seven yard line, but tailback
Ted Kress, leading ground gainer
for the afternoon, slanted off
tackle to the one, and fumbled.
Wingback Tony Branoff grabbed
the ball in the end zone for six
points. Russ Rescorla missed thez
conversion.
Kress sprinted around end for
22 yards and another score 10 min-
untes and 10 seconds later. Res-
corla converted and itawas flli-
nois 22, Michigan 13. Then it be-
gan to look as if the Maize and
Blue might make the grade.
Starting on its own 20, Michi-
gan forged 73 yards on running
by, Branoff and Kress and a 23-
yard pass from Quarterback Ted
Topor to Perry.
But the drive stalled when the
Wolverines failed to make a yard
in two attempts from the Illinois
8. Fullback Dick Balzhiser made
no yardage up the middle and Top-
or was smeared on a quarterback
sneak to give the Illini the ball
on downs.
That was the turning point for
Maize and Blue fortunes. The Wol-
verines got their hands on the ball
three more times, but the Illinois
defense stiffened, and Michigan got
no closer than the Illinois 45 yard
line.
* . *
MICHIGAN'S defense found it-
self along with the Wolverine of-
fense. Illinois gained only 46 yards
in the second half. O'Connell com-
pleted five more passes for 14
yards to run his total aerial yard-
age to 124 for the afternoon. That
total was slightly less than the 181
yards he averaged during Illinois'
first five games.
Of Michigan's'209-yard-total
(163 in the second half) Kress
gained 92 yards in 21 tries. Il-
linois's top runner was Miller
with 78 yards in 14 carries.
As for the Rose Bowl, and a Con-
ference championship, Michigan
must beat Purdue and Ohio State
for a tie for league honors.

Assuming Wisconsin wins its re-
maining games with Minnesota,
Indiana, and Northwestern, and
Purdue loses to Michigan, but beats
Indiana and Minnesota, Michigan
could make a three way tie for
the championship with the Boiler-
makers and Badgers."
Then the Rose Bowl representa-
tive would be selected by vote. The
referendum would likely favor Wis-
consin for a better overall season
record.
Bowled Over
MICHIGAN
LE-Perry, Green
LT-Strozewski, Balog, Walker
LG-Tinm, Williams, Matheson
C--O'Shaughnessy
RG-Beison, Dugget
RT-Pederson, Zatkoff, Bennett
RE -- Stanford, Topp, Knutson,
Dingman
QB--Topor, Billings
LH - Kress, Knickerbocker, Tink-
ham, Oldham
RH-Howell, Branoff, Witherspoon
FB-Balzhiser, Rescorla, LeClaire
ILLINOIS
LE-Ryan, Wodziak, Waldbeser
LT-Elsner, Kohlhagen, Weddell
LG-vernasco, Smid, Lenzini Bau-
er, John
C-Sabino, Luhrsen, Borman
RG-T. Murphy, J. Hall, Ernst,
Bishop
RT-Palmer, R. Miller, Wolf
RE-Smith, Stevens, Scott
QB-O'Connell, Falkenstein
LH-Wallace, Neathery, Swienton
RH-DeMoss, Brosky
FB-Miller, K., Stewart, Bachouros
SCORE BY PERIODS
MICHIGAN 0 0 13 0-13
ILLINOIS 9 13 0 0-22
TOUCHDOWNS
MICHIGAN-Branoff, Kress
ILLINOIS-Miller, K., O'Connell (2)
CONVERSIONS
MICHIGAN-Rescorla
ILLINOIS-R. Miller (2)
SAFETIES
ILLINOIS (Wodziak)
Time of Game: 2 Hours, 22 Minutes
Official Attendance: 64,752

By DICK SEWELL
Associate Sports Editor
There was no scent of roses in
the Michigan locker room after
yesterday's stunning loss to Illi-
nois' fired-up gridders; nothing
but blood, sweat and tears.
Few words were spoken as the
disillusioned Wolverines hurried
through their showers. Coach. Ben
Oosterbaan moved slowly about
the hushed room. He took the de-
feat philosophically, crediting the
Illini with a fard-fought, well-de-
served victory.
RELUCTANT to name any sin-
gle Michigan player as outstand-
ing, Oosterbaan felt that "every-
one gave all he had from start to
finish," and that the loss was
"just one of those things."
When asked by one sports-
writer whether a Michigan
touchdown on the fourth quar-
ter drive which carried to the
Illinois nine wouldn't have been
a big help, the Maize and Blue
mentor smiled slowly and admit-

-Daily--Malcolm Shatz
DOWN THE SIDELINES-Illinois fullback Ken Miller races down the sidelines shortly before being
tackled by defensive halfback Dave Tinkham.

GeorgiaTech Tops Unbeaten Duke;
UCLA Rolls over California, 2 1-7

ted that "it would have been'
jnice."
"But," he was quick to add,
"they stopped us cold and deserve
more credit for it."
Across the tunnel in the Illi-
nois locker room the visitors
whooped it up loud and long.
Flash bulbs popped like artillery
flares as eager photographers took
shots of the upset leaders.
ILLINI COACH Ray Eliot had
nothing but respect to pay the
Wolverines. "They played a rug-
ged, clean game all the way," he
commented.
Eliot and his grinning assist-
ants felt that the two blocked
kicks early in the contest were
instrumental in the Illinois tri-
umph. "That gave our boys the
confidence they needed," Eliot
said happily.
Illinois coaches singled out
Michigan tailback Ted Kress for
special comment. "He is a fine
runner and was a thorn in our
side all afternoon," Eliot noted.
He also had words of praise for
Wolverines Tim Green, Don Dug-
ger and Roger Zatkoff.
As for his own team, Eliot listed
end Frank Wodziak, guard Bob
Lenzini and fullback Ken Miller
as being especially effective.
The bespectacled mentor ex-
pressed concern over the Illinois
injury list. Wodziak suffered a
wrenched shoulder, flanker Cliff
Waldbeser a dislocated elbow, and
Miller a twisted ankle.
Michigan trainer Jim Hunt re-
ported no serious physical in-
juries, but an abundant crop of
physical and mental bruises.
LATE FOOTBALL SCORES
FAR WEST
Washington State 36, Idaho 6
Montana 35, Montana State 12
Stanford 35, San Jose 13
Washington 38, Oregon State 13
UCLA 21, California 7
NHL HOCKEY RESULTS
Montreal 4, New York 1
Toronto 3, Boston 2

MSC Lays
Purdue Low
In 14-7 Tilt
LAFAYETTE, Ind.-QP)--Michi-
gan State showed what might have
been-if the Spartans were Rose
Bowl contenders this year - by
shading the Purdue team, a lead-
ing Rose Bowl contender, by a
narrow margin 14-7 edge here yes-
terday.
A near capacity crowd of 49,500,
which topped the Notre Dame at
tendance here by 500, saw Michi-'
gan State roll for two easy touchy
downs in the first half but falter
in the second half as Purdue held
the nation's top-rated team score-
less during the last two periods.
A POOR PUNT by Norm Mont-
gomery, which went only to the
Purdue 28 yard line, helped set up
the first score.
After two running plays car-
ried the ball to the 21 yard
line, big Don McAuliffe blasted
through for a first down on the
Purdue 15. Bill Wells broke
away to the two yard line and
McAuliffe toppled himself over
for the score.
A fumble by Purdue quarterback
Dale Samuels, recovered on the
Michigan State 42 by Ed Lue, gave
the Spartans another chance.
MICHIGAN STATE drove down
to the seven yard line with Mc-
Auliffe and Wells alternating in
the carrying. Yewcic skirted right
end into touchdown territory. He
fumbled in the end zone but the
ball was ruled dead and the score
counted.
With two minutes left in the
game Purdue powered from its
own 20 yard line all the way to
the Michigan State eight. Sam-
uels and Roy Evans were hitting
their receivers to eat up the dis-
tance.
Samuels threw one too many,
however. Linebacker Doug Weav-
er intercepted a pass by Samuels
just in front of the goal line to
break up the attack.

Illinois Michigan
14 10

First Downs
Rushing Yardage
Passing Yardage
Passes Attempted
Passes Completed
Passes Intercepted
Punts
Punting Average
Fumbles Lost
Yards Penalized

130
124
29
14
4
6
39.?
2
10

123
86
22
8
2
6
22.2
3
26

By the Associated Press
Old man upset, the fellow who
gets football coaches gray, was
nothing more than a shadow lurk-
ing in the background again to-
day as most of the top college
football teams came through with
expected victories.
In the two headline attractions,
bowl-bound Georgia Tech, defeat-
ed Duke, 28-7, in a battle of un-
beattens, and U.C.L.A., all but
knocked California out of the Rose
Bowl with a 28-7 victory over the
Golden Bears, the favorites to win
the Pacific Coast Conference title
before the season started.
* * *
BOTH THESE games were toss-
ups, so no matter which team won,
the result would not have been a
surprise.
For Georgia Tech, the triumph
was the Ramblin' Wrecks' sev-
enth without a loss and all but
assured them of a bowl bid--
probably the Sugar or Orange.
Duke, the Southern Conference
powerhouse, could not contain
Tech's galloping backs, Leon
Hardeman, Glenn Turner and
Billy Teas, and that was the
story.

Worth (a million) Lutz, Duke's
celebrated quarterback, was throt-
tled completely by the Tech de-
fense and was benched late in the
first half. A stunned crowd of
about 45,000 watched at Durham,
N. C.
** * *
U.C.L.A. GRABBED the lead in
the first period before a gather-
ing of 81,000 in Berkeley, Calif.,
when Paul Cameron passed to Er-
nie Stockert. The Bruins, who now
rate co-favorites with idle South-
ern California for the P. C. C.
crown, notched another one in the
third period on a Cameron to
Stockert pass following a fumble
by Johnny Olszewski, and made
their final tally in the last quarter
on a toss from Ted Narleski to
Ike Jones.
Michigan State, Maryland,
and Oklahoma which rang 1-2-3
in the weekly Associated Press
Poll, continued to roll along al-
though the top-ranked Spartans
had only a narrow 14-7 margin
over Purdue, the Big Ten leader
Maryland polished off Boston
University, 34-7, and Oklahoma
had nothing more than a brisk
workout at the expense of Iowa

State, 41-0. Kansas, which still has
hopes of beating out Oklahoma for
the Big Seven title, walloped Kan-
sas State, 26-6.
Today's action, coupled with Vil-
lanova's 20-20 tie with the Parris
Island 'Marines lasttnight, left
the list of unbeaten and untied,
teams among the major colleges!
at five-Michigan State (6-0),
Maryland (7-0), Georgia Tech
(7-0), Southern California (6-0)

4V

ialist, also converted after
three Ohio touchdowns.

the

The five-foot, five-inch Weed,
with quarterback John Borton
holding, plunked the big boot
from a spot about 15 yards to
the side of the goal posts.
Northwestern erased a 7-0 defi-
cit in the opening period on a lucky
fumble recovery in the end zone
and moved ahead in the second

1U

and U.C.L.A. (7-0). Duke and Vi-I period as quarterback Dick Thomas

lanova dropped out.
OHIO STATE 24, NORTHWESTE
OHIO STATE 24,
NORTHWESTERN 21
The smallest player in the Big
Ten, 128-pound Tad Weed, booted
a difficult 17-yard field goal to
climax a 17-point fourth period
rally which gave Ohio State a
thrilling 24-21'victory over North-
western today.
Trailing 21-7 entering the final
quarter of this nationally-televised
conference game, Ohio State
punched across two touchdowns
for a 21-21 tie and then calmly
booted his deciding three-pointer
with six minutes left.
* * *
WEED, SOLELY a kicking spec-

rifled two long touchdown passes
to end Joe Collier.
After a scoreless third period, it
appeared that Northwestern could
easily nurse its 14-point lead to
victory.
But a poor 10-yard Northwest-
ern punt early in the fourth per-
iod enabled halfback Fred Bruney
to scoot across from the two yard
line.
Minutes later, the Buckeyes
scored quickly on Borton's 42-
yard payoff pass to Bruney, who
grabbed the ball on the 10 and
did some fancy dodging to make
the end zone.

Fountain Pens
Greeting Cards
Stationery
Office Supplies
Typewriters
W/C Tape &'
Wire Recorders
" s *
Steel Desks,
Chairs, Files
aMe.

Ac
w.1

l

Collegiate Cuts
to please

I ---

8 BARBERS
NO WAITING

I

The Daseola Barbers
Near Michigan Theater

SMORR LL'S PhD
314 S. State 7177
Open Saturday till5 P.M.
Except on Home Games

L---

.

National Football Scoreboard

o-
EAST
Princeton 39, Brown 0
Colgate 53, Mississippi College 12
Maryland 34, Boston University 7
Yale 21, Dartmouth 7
Detroit 28, Fordham 20
Cornell 21, Columbia 14
Army 42, VMI 14
Pittsburgh 28, Indiana '7
Harvard 35, Davidson 26
Penn State 14, Penn 7
Bucknell 28, Lehigh 6
Rutgers 40, Temple 28
Bowdoin 28, Bates 6
Washington & Jefferson 35,
Carnegie Tech 20
Amhert 35, Tufts 0
Connecticut 16,
New Hampshire 12
Union 34, Williams 25
MIDWEST
Holy Cross 7, Marquette 0

Kansas 26, Kansas State 6
Oklahoma 41, Iowa State 0
Ohio University 28,
Western Michigan 13
Tulsa 23, Oklahoma A&M 21
Illinois 22, Michigan 13
Ohio State 24, Northwestern 21
Michigan State 14, Purdue 7.
Minnesota 17, Iowa 7
Denver 27, Drake 19
Missouri 10, Nebraska 6
Miami (Ohio) 27, Toledo 13
Bowling Green 44, Kent State 21
Indiana State 14, DePauw 7
Hillsdale 26, University of
Illinois Navy Pier 13
Michigan Tech 12,
Superior State 6
Alma 28, Adrian 13
Albion 20, Wilmington 0
Rochester 34, Oberlin 13,
Anderson 14, Defiance 0

SOUTH
Tulane 34, Minnissippi State 21
Mississippi 28, LSU 0
VPI 20, Richmond 2
Alabama 34, Georgia 19
South Carolina 21, Virginia 14
Vanderbilt 67, Wash. & Lee 7
Georgia Tech 28, Duke 7
Tennessee 41, North Carolina 14
Notre Dame 17, Navy 6
West Virginia 24,
GeorgesWashington 0
Wake Forest 21,
North Carolina State 6
Florida 31, Auburn 21
SOUTHWEST
Texas 31, SMU 14
Abilene Christian 48,
Texas A & I 13
Wisconsin 21, Rice 7
TCU 20, Baylor 20
Wyoming 24, Brigham Young 13

SIAMESE FIGHTING FISH
Males of this tropical fish will fight to the death when placed together.
Natives of regions of Cambodia wager on the outcome of such battles.
The fish come in many colors (blues, reds, greens) and so are easily
identifiable. One male may be kept with other types of tropicals.
Siamese fighting fish and many others are obtainable at UNIVERSITY
AOT ''nTT7,4
UNIVERSITY AQUARIUM
328 East Liberty near Division

i
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i

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STAR CLEANERS
1213 SOUTH UNIVERSITY
DRY CLEANING SPECIALS
FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY
FOR THE PRICE OFZ
SUITS * COATS. DRESSESe PLAIN
$1.00 each or 3 for $2.00
COMBINATION OF EITHER
2 FOR THE PRICE OF2

SENIOR PICTURES

~fv q4,w' Readin9 (kIeaUw'e
o FICTION
The Devils of Loudun-Aldous Huxley 4.00
Short Stories-Colette 3.50
Giant-Edna Ferber 3.95
The Comancheros-Paul Wellman 2.75
Autumn Thunder-Robert Wilder 3.50

PROOFS.

I

MUST be returned to the
Student Publications Building

. NON-FICTION

The Herblock Book-Herbert Block-- 2.75
The Selected Prose of Bernard Shaw 6.50

1

Complete Book of Etiquette-A. Vanderbilt 5.00

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