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October 24, 1952 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-24

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1952 WAGE SEVEN

BAND TAKES OVER:
Heyday of 'U' Banjo Clubs Shortlived

Eastern Art

Japanese Art Exhibition

By VIRGINIA VOSS
Long before the Michigan
Marching Band could get enough
money to finance its high-step-
ping antics, the University Banjo
and Mandolin Clubs strummed
their way into campus and alumni
-. favor.
Victims of changing style, the
clubs are non-existent today ex-
cept for their watered-down suc-
cessors, the ukelele fans. But in
their heyday around the turn of
the century, they had a musical
monopoly on campus and present-
ed local concerts and extended
tours practically unrivalled by the
array of activities flourishing now.
CHIEF FUNCTION of the clubs
was to spread the mythical "college
spirit" among students and the
ever-devoted alumni. Their means
were "college songs."
According to nineteenth cen-
tury outlook, "college songs"
were no light matter. One of
the forerunners to the 'Ensian
commented in 1860: "Of all the
feattres in College life which
fix imperishable associations and
r bind indissolubly the hearts of
friend to friend, we hail the ad-
vent of none with more unquali-
4 fled gratification than that of
. College Songs."
* Alumni had no trouble going
along with, this viewpoint. After
a tour performance in Denver in
i 1895, the banjo, mandolin and glee
clubs inspired this comment in a
congratulatory letter: "People
speak enthusiastically of the Uni-
versity and have had their eyes
opened to the fact that U. of M. is
a great institution."
I BANJO CLUB members them-
selves were the only ones able to
look at their project in reasonable
perspective. They whooped it up
at every available opportunity.
In 1911 the mandolin and glee
'clubs, joined under the title of
SMichigan Musical Clubs, took
their 30-odd members and
mandolins, guitars, violins, flutes
and traps on a month tour to
the Pacific coast.
According to an account of the
trip in the 1912 'Ensian, the much
anticipated sight-seeing itineraries
usually wound up at roulette
wheels. High point of the mara-
thon excursion was "the glad tid-
ings from President Hutchins that
we were granted a four days' stay
in Los Angeles."
Back In Ann Arbor, the jovial
banjoists saw the two chief bene-
fits of their tour as "its education-
al value and insight into what it
means to be a Michigan man."
Precceded by numerous but
short-lived instrumental organiza-
tions, the banjo and mandolin
clubs thrived from 1895 well into
the 1910's. Their downfall was the
growth of more substantial cam-
pus groups, and the Regents' 1914
appropriation which gave the band
its initial impetus,
Campu,
Four University faculty mem-
bers will participate in a confer-
ence of the Near and Middle East
committee of the Social Science
Research Council today and to-
morrow in New York City.
The theme of the meeting is
"The Near East: Social Dynamics
and the Cultural Setting." Taking
t part will be: George G. Cameron,
chairman of the Department of
Near Eastern Studies, and com-
mittee chairman; and Professors
Douglas Crary, of the geography
department; N. Marbury Efimenco
of the political science depart-
ment and William Schorger.
S * *

Prof. Louis A. Baier, chair-
man of the Department of Na-
val Architecture and Marine En-
gineering, is attending a meeting
of the Hydrodynamics Commit-
tee of the Society of Naval Ar-
chitects and Marine Engineers
in Washington, D.C. today.
MORE THAN 4,000 persons are
expected to attend the eighth an-
nual Michigan High School Con-
ference on Citizenship and the
third annual state-wide Cheer-
leaders' Clinic at the University
Oct. 29 and Nov. 8, respectively..

* * *

* *

* * *

.1

BANJO AND MANDOLIN CLUBS STRUCK A SYMMETRICAL POSE FOR 1898 'ENSIAN

Emphasizes
Trth, Color
Speaking yesterday on the sub-
ject of "Japanese Sculpture,"
James M. Plumer, Professor of
Far Eastern Art, said that "the
aim of a Japanese artisan is nev-
er to create the novel but only
the truth."
Always receptive to nature's
products in the rough and retain-
ing a taste for color in their works,
the Japanese have been influenced
neither by personalities nor by
copies, he maintained.
* * *
ILLUSTRATING , the lecture
with slides of Japanese works,
Prof. Plumer remarked, "Tracing
the history of images is as diffi-
cult as tracing the pedigree of a
hound."
The original concepts began in
India, the Chinese crystalized
and further stylized them, where
as in Japan the image is modi-
fied and humanized.
Since almost all Japanese sculp-
ture is of sacred images, the great-
est works are still found in the
temples. Use of wood has been the
most predominant, although
bronze, stone, and clay are also
conspicuous in the history of
sculpture.
This was the second lecture of
the Japanese Festival which will
end Nov. 2. Celebrating the recent
signing of the Japanese peace
treaty, the Festival has on display
in the West Gallery of Alumni
Memorial Hall a complete replica
of a Japanese house and garden
furnished with authentic works of
art.
SL Cinema Guild
To Show Movie
Student Legislature Cinema
Guild will present Ben Hecht's
"Specter of the Rose" at 5:30, 7:30
and 9:30 p.m. today, tomorrow and
Sunday in Architecture Auditori-
um.
The picture, a conscientious at-
tempt to deviate from the normal
path of commercial films, deals
with the story ofdan innocent
young ballerina's devotion to a
mad, murderous dancing genius.
Choreography for the film was
done by Tamara Geva, music by
George Antheil.
A Charlie Chaplin Comedy, "On
A.M." is also included on the pro-
gram. Admission is fifty cents at
Ithe door.

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
JAPANESE HOME-University students examine the model home on display at the Japanese Art
Exhibit in Alumni Memorial Hall. More than 4,000 students and Ann Arbor residents have already
visited the art exhibition scheduled to be taken down Sunday evening.

'U' TV Program.
To Discuss X-Ray
The X-ray and its contribution
to atomic theory will be the sub-
ject of the second program in the
modern physics series on the Uni-
versity Television Hour.
The series, consisting of 15 tele-
casts, is given in the form of a
course and can be seen at 1 p.m.
Sunday over WWJ-TV.
Prof. Ernest F. Baker, chairman
of the physics department, who is
conducting the telecourse will give
both the historical background and
the modern medical and industrial
applications of the X-ray.
The program will also include
a short feature on the life of Wil-
helm K. Roentgen, who discovered
the X-ray.
This is the final week to make
Senior Picture appointments. You
may sign up from 1:30 to 5:30
until Fri. at the Student Publi-
cations Building.

~J~amie /ot L ear]
THE
GOLDEN APPLES
RESTAURANT
Now Serving: BREAKFAST
LUNCHEON
DINNERS
BRING YOUR DATE . . . She'll Love It!!
rand addition to
THE TOWER HOTEL

'U' BAND IN EARLY DAYS LOOKED DOWDY BY COMPARISON

y Grad Represents
l 'U' in AustraliaF
Ben Cochran, a University grad-
t uate, will represent the University
today when the Australian Na-
t tional University in Canberra in-
stalls its first chancellor.
o Cochran, who received his Doc-
tor of Philosophy degree in 1926,
is at present Acting High Com-
missioner of the United Kingdom
in Australia.
s Briefs
MORE THAN 200 persons from
Michigan, Ohio and Indiana will
t attend a meeting of the Great
Lakes Section ,of the Forest Prod-
ucts Research Society, to be held
Oct. 31-Nov. 1 in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
* * *
Lectures
PROF. CORA DuBois, research
director of the Institute of Inter-
national Education in New York,
will discuss "Various Concepts of
Culture and Their Bearing on
Problem Solving' at 8:15 p.m.
Monday in Rackham Amphithea-
tre.
James E. Milligan, Grad., will
give a short talk entitled "Be-
tween the Planets" at 7:30 p.m.
today in Rm. 2003 Angell Hall
as a part of the regular astron-
omy department Observatory
Visitors' Night.
s s s
Miscellany
A CASEBOOK for law students,
"Jurdisdiction and Judgements,"
which combine cases, text material
and statutes, has been published
by two University Faculty mem-
bers.

UNIVERSALISM:
New Experimental Religion
Embodies Ideas Of All Faithsi

Read and Use Daily Classifieds

*

{

Naturalism is a feature of the
experimental laboratory for the
development of universalism in re-
ligious thought, Rev. Kenneth L.
Patton said yesterday.
Speaking before the Unitarian
student group, Rev. Patton said
that one of the basic assumptions
of this coicept is that the world
has been artificially split into cul-
tures and religions. Pointing out
this fact, Mr. Patton who is min-
ister of the Charles Street Unver-
salist Meeting House of Boston,
stated that all the religions of
the world are equally good and
that none of them have the truth.
* * *
THE UNIVERSALIST Meeting
House is an experimental idea in

religion which incorporates all the
symbols of all the faiths from the
earliest sun worshippers to the
symbols of the great religions to-
day. .

_

-I

s

Are You Eligible?
DANCING
Friday and Saturday Nites
Dancing Saturday Afternoon
after the game.

CLUB

Members
and Guests
314 E. Liberty St.
Ph. 2-3972
You Must Be 21

DON BAILEY
Your Singing Host

' HALL RENTALS & BANQUETS

11

1

Uan &haven
SPORT SHIRTS FOR FALL

eQ
04
YOU CAN'T STOP THE CLOCK!
Thi is absltlytelst day osg pfrSno
Pictures. Appointment can be made at the Student
Publications Building from 1:00 to 5:30 P.M. ..*
Pictures will be taken from 1 2:30 till 5 :30 and
Evenings from 7:30 till 10:00.

We now have a full
fabrics and patterns
Fall leisure shirts.

seletion of
of the finest

Come in and see them. Note the. shorter,
neater collar points. Check the custom
features from ocean pearl buttons to
matched patterns and squared cuffs.
We are sure they will please you.

$595

I

e {01

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