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October 24, 1952 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1952-10-24

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

I'Looks Sharp as Gopher Tilt Nears

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HERE MUST BE a better way to make an honest buck nowadays
than trying to predict the results of college football games. The
job is more hazardous than a window washer's on the Empire State
building.
Every Saturday evening finds the nation knee deep in alleged
upsets, putting the pigskin prognostigator farther and farther out
on the limb. Minnesota beats Illinois, Pittsburg edges Notre Dame,'
Ohio State knocks off Wisconsin. Each result seems almost totally
out of the realm of possibility, but it happens.
Sometimes one school in particular goes out of its way to do the.
unbelievable and stirs up a small degree of personal resentment
among the crystal ball sportwriters. Notre Dame has affected this
reporter that way this season.
In their opener with Penn the Irish were figured to be at
lease a one touchdown underdog by game-time. But despite the
fact that Penn shoved them all over the field, they managed to
salvage a tie. Ties don't count in predictions. Result-one loss.
The following, Saturday Notre Dame faced powerful Texas, then
ranked number three in the national polls. Taking into consideration
the fact that the South Benders didn't impress their first game and
that the game was going to be played in Texas, the odds seemed
definitely to favor the Longhorns.
Notre Dame Ignores Odds ...
SOMIEHOW NOTRE DAME was unaware of the odds, for it rallied
in the second half to upset Texas. Another loss for yours truly.
By this time it looked like suicide to bet against Notre Dame under
any circumstances.
So in the third gridiron duel with Pittsburg who would have
been foolish enough to pick the Panthers? Nobody did, or so it
seemed, which was too bad, recalling that 22-19 upset that Pitt
pulled.
When unbeaten and widely heralded Purdue played host to the
Irish at Lafayette last Saturday, it looked like the percentages would
finally catch up with old Notre Dame.
No doubt you know what happened. The Boilermakers went
wild giving the ball away and ND wound up smelling like roses.
The results thus far: Notre Dame 4, Jenks 0. The Irish play a
polio-stricken North Carolina team tomorrow. Who would you
pick?
Where Was Terrific -ed?
THE EMERGENCE of Ted Kress as Michigan's newest sensation
poses a problem to those who are familiar with the Wolverine
football situation. Why was he held back while -inferior personnel
played ahead of him last year?
The papers parrot the athletic office statement to the effect that
Mr. Kress was injured last year. Nothing could be farther from the
truth. Kress was as ready to go physically last year as he ever will
be. He always has been a "Joe Condition."
The only apparent reason for his benching was psychological.
The terrific tailback is admittedly an unstable carrier, as evidenced
by his six fumbles last week, but his potential is so great it far
outweighs this handicap.
If you remember, Michigan's tailback last year failed to provide
the Wolverine attack with any punch. Although he had tremendous
heart, he was very average as a runner, passer or blocker.
Under-his leadership the Maize and Blue experienced its worst
season In over a decade. What would have occurred had the
coaches gambled with Kress is pure speculation, but the results
couldn't have been much worse, and possibly they would have
been significantly better.
The strange case of Bob Hurley is another puzzler. For three
years now fullback Hurley has been the talk of spring practice. He
runs hard, is relatively fast, and is perhaps the hardest worker on
the squad.
Many of the players themselves have wondered why the Alamosa,
Colorado, youth was kept under wraps. While nine of 10 players
would have quit in discouragement, Hurley hung in there in the belief
that someday "they" would have to use him. He did get his chance,
but a back inury last week hurt his future career.
11 m 11 )

Drill Shows
Howell Back
In TopForm
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan put
his charges through a stiff but
contactless workout yesterday in
the final full-scale practice before
tomorrow's contest with Minneso-
ta.
The spirited Wolverines looked
razor sharp as they ran through
a series of defensive drills against
Gopher plays, followed by a brief
kicking and punt return exercise,
and topped off by a lengthy dum-
my scrimmage.
* * A
MICHIGAN'S number one of-
fensive unit of Ted Topor at quar-
terback, Ted Kress and Frank
Howell at the halves, and Dick
Balizhiser at fullback, charged
through the imaginary Gopher
forward wall with amazing speed
and precision.
Howell, at top form for the
first time since the Michigan
State opener, raced over the
turf with all his old cat-like
quickness.
The Muskegon Heights senior
was so dogged on his hard-charg-
ing rushes that at one time he
collided with blocker Tad Stan-
ford, causing a cut over the Mich-
igan end's eye. Stanford was hit
when he fell down in front of
Howell, whose foot struck him on
the head.
*I * *
QUARTERBACKING the num-
ber two Maize and Blue backfield
was sophopore Duncan McDonald,
The University golf course
closes for the season on Sun-
day night, Oct. 26. Please clean
out all lockers.
-Harry Kaseberg

By PHIL DOUGLIS
History repeate ditself yesterday
afternoon in the annual fraternity
cross country meet on University
Golf Course as Kappa Sigma
topped the team standings and'
Sigma Phi Epsilon's Bob Cut-
ting took individual honors, both
winning for the second consecu-
tive year.
The Kappa Sigs' thereby retire
the IM fraternity cross country
trophy, winning today for the
third time.
* *-*
ALTHOUGH the swift Cutting
took first place, the Kappa Sigs
tallied 24 points to win, on the ba-
sis of a' fourth, eighth, and 12th
place finish. The winner was de-
cided on a low score basis.
Kappa Sigma had it pretty
much to themselves, with the
second place teams, Lambda
Chi Alpha and Sigma Phi Ep-
silon, tying at 34 points. Phi
Delta Theta was fourth with 56,
and Acacia fifth with 59.
Cutting, in winning his second,
fraternity cross country race, had
Phi Delta Phi,
Lawyer's Club-
Shut Out Foes'
By GORDON MARS
-The Law Club continued its '\in-
ning ways yesterday afternoon,
defeating Tau Epsilon Rho, 23-0,
in the professional fraternity IMI
league.
The passing of Robert Cary ac-
counted for all of the Law Club's
scores, except for a safety scored
early in the first half. Cary con-
nected with Dave Ray, Dave Dowd,
and Phil Reamon for the touch-
downs. Mike Papistai, Dowd, and
Reamon were on the receiving end
of aerials for the respective extra
points.

an easy time of it also, racking up
a time of nine minutes, 18 seconds
over the course of slightly under
two miles. He crossed the finish
line 18 seconds ahead of second
place man, Lambda Chi Alpha's
Dick Brown.John Filden of Sig-
ma Chi was third.
THE RACE itself saw Cutting'
jump.out to an early lead. onlyvto
lose it to Kappa Sigmas' John
Piazza at the first quarter. Cutting
made his bid at the halfway mark,
and roared past Piazza and the
rest of the field to win going away.
Piazza, however, had a big
hand in Kappa Sign. -riiing
team total, as he flashed to a.
fourth place finish. The other
two men who placed for Kap-
pa Sigma were Rad Fisher,
eighth, and Jack Kinnel, 12th.

For second place Lambda Chi
Alpha, in addition to Brown's sec-
ond place finish, Marc McQuiggan
came in 14th and Dave West 18th
For the Sig Eps, besides Cuttings
first place, Warren Wood placed
13th and Jim Hellenberg 20th.
FINISHERS in the top ten not
already mentioned include Ph
Delta Theta's Tom Edwards, who
took fifth, the sixth -place Ron
Fisher of Pi Lambda Phi, Bill Dei-
ner of Chi Psi, seventh, ninth plac
finisher Bob Young of Sigma Al.
pha Epsilon, and Frank Winde
of Acacia, who finished 10th.
Pi Lambda Phi with 65 ,points
Sigma Alpha Epsilon with 73
points, and Chi Psi with 82 points
were the sixth, seventh, and eighth
place, respectively, in the meet.

CUTTING PACES FIELD:
Kappa Sigs Win IM Cross Country

,i

1

GRID SELECTIONS

-1

GAMES OF THE WEEK
Consensus selections (42-15) appear in.capitals

1. Minnesota at MICHIGAN
2. Purdue at ILLINOIS
3. CALIFORNIA at Southern Cal.
4. Navy at PENN
5. UCLA at WISCONSIN
6. INDIANA at Northwestern
7. OHIO STATE at Iowa

8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.

KANSAS at Southern Methodist
GEORGIA at Florida
Detroit at OKLAHOMA A&M
Penn State at MICH. STATE
MISSISSIPPI at Arkansas
No. Carolina at NOTRE DAME
TEXAS at Rice

15. Texas A&M at BAYLOR

who called the signals for Fred
Baer at fullback and Tom With-
erspoon and Red Evans at the
halfback positions.
McDonald also held the ball
for fullback Russ Rescorla in the
extra-pointhsession, and later
took over the attempts at con-
version with Kress holding.
Both booted from ten yards out.
Once again senior Bill Billings
got off a string.of booming punts
with Tony Branoff, Lowell Perry,
Don Oldham, Dave Tinkham, Dan
Cline and Howell alternately on
the receiving ends.
OOSTERBAAN'S rugged defen-
sive eleven put in a long afternoon,
working to stop Minnesota run-
ning and passing plays, and wind-
ing up with a rushing the kicker
workout.
Ex-Wolverine grid captain Bill
Putich masqueraded as Paul
Giel in the "red-shirt" back-
field, going so far as to wear
Giel's white-shirted number i1
in addition to emulating the
standout Minnesotan's passing
and running prowess.
Linebackers Laurie LeClaire and
Roger Zatkoff stopped the simu-
lated Ski-U-Mah attack with in-
creasing frequency, and Gene
Knutson and Captain Merritt
Green played their usual heads-up
game at the defensive end spots.
Rescorla and Tinkham patrolled
the secondary, spelled by Cline,
Oldham, Stan Knickerbocker and
Baer.
Tackles Jim Balog and Art
Walker impressed in rushing the
kicker, with Walker taking a punt
right in the gut. The sophomore
tackle ran back to his position with
a wide grin across his face.
NHL HOCKEY RESULT
Montreal 2, Chicago 2 (tie)

* * *
PHI DELTA PHI blanked Phi
Delta Epsilon, 30-0, under Grang-
er Cook's capable leadership,.lie
scored first on a run, then threw
to Jim Dickerson for the point'
after touchdown. Pete Van Dome-
line was responsible for a safety
in the first half.
In the second half, pay dirt
was reached by Van Domelin
after a lateral-pass combination
of Cook to Don Lunt was set
up. Cook passed to Jim Gault
and Patrick for two more tal-
lies. As added insurance three
extra points were added by
aerials to the respective score
makers.
John Glick set the pace for Delta
Sigma Delta as they blanked Phi
Rho Sigma, 34-0. Glick to Ray'
Sawasch was4the combination#
that scored first, with the extra
point added by a pass from Glick
to Ed Garrison. Garrison, Bill
Shelton, and Chuck Murray re-
ceived passes from Glick. Two
tosses, one to Dave Siebold, the
other to Sawasch, meant two extra
points.
* * *
THE LAST SCORE of the game
came on a short pass, this time
from Sawasch to Glick. Bob Ved-
der scored the remaining point on
a pass.
Other games played saw Al-
pha Kappa Kappa down Alpha
Chi Sigma, 19-0. AKK controlled
the game from the outset.
Phi Alpha Delta blanked Alpha
Kappa Psi, 7-0, in a close game.
The lone tally came just before
the final whistle.
In the remaining game, Phi Ep-
silon Kappa forfeited to Alpha
Rho Chi.

SELECTIONS
ED WHIPPLE (44-13-.772)--Michigan, Illinois, California, Penn, Wis-
consin, Indiana, OSU, SMU, Georgia, Detroit, MSC, Arkansas,
Notre Dame, Texas, Texas A&M
PAUL GREENBERG (44-13-:.772)-Michigan, Purdue, USC, Penn,
UCLA, Indiana, OSU, SMU, Georgia, Oklahoma A&M, MSC,
Mississippi, Notre Dame, Texas, Baylor
IVAN KAYE (43-14-.754)-Michigan, Illinois, California, Penn, Wis-
consin, Indiana, OSU, Kansas, Georgia, Oklahoma A&M, MSC,
Mississippi, Notre Dame, Texas, Texas A&M
NEIL BERNSTEIN (41-16-.719)--Michigan, Purdue, California, Penn,
UCLA, Indiana, OSU, Kansas, Georgia, Oklahoma A&M, MSC,
Arkansas, Notre Dame, Texas, Baylor
ED SMITH (43-14-.754)--Michigan, Illinois, California, Penn, UCLA,
Indiana, OSU, Kansas, Georgia, Oklahoma A&M, MSC, Missis-
sippi, Notre Dame, Texas, Texas A&M
JOHN JENKS (40-17-.702) -Michigan, Illinois, California, Penn, Wis-
consin, Indiana, OSU, Kansas, Georgia, Oklahoma A&M, MSC,
Mississippi, Notre Dame, Texas, Baylor
DICK LEWIS (39-18-.684) -Michigan, Illinois, USC, Navy, Wisconsin,
Indiana, OSU, Kansas, Florida, Detroit, MSC, Mississippi, Notre
Dame, Rice, Baylor
BOB MARGOLIN (39-18-.684)-Michigan, Purdue, California, Penn,
Wisconsin, Indiana, OSU, SMU, Georgia, Oklahoma A&M, MSC,
Mississippi, Notre Dame, Texas, Baylor
DICK SEWELL (36-21-.632)-Michigan, Purdue, USC, Penn, UCLA,
Indiana, OSU, SMU, Georgia, Oklahoma A&M, MSC, Mississippi,
Notre Dame, Texas, Baylor

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