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October 23, 1952 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-23

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1952

FIFTY-FIRST CONCERT:
Stanley Quartet To Open Fall Season
* * 4

Autority Finds Aesthetic
Conflict in Whitman Poetry

i..

*FIIEfl

By CYNTHIA BOYES
The University's resident Stan-
ley Quartet, currently getting its
fourth season underway, will con-
tinue to follow its established poli-
cy of interspersing new chamber
'music works by contemporary
composers in its programs of time-
honored string quartet woris.
The Quartet will play its fifty-
first concert at 8:30 p.m. Wednes-
day in Rackham Lecture Hall,
opening the t'hreepro rau iseries
td be given on campus this. year.
* * *
ESTABLISHED by the Universi-
ty in 1949, the quartet honors the
name of Albert Al Stanley, an out-
stgnalipg name in AnnArbor's ear-
lyniusical life and professor of
music at tie University from 1889
to 1922.
Designed to be. of service to
4music and musicians in Michi-
gan, the Quartet each season
introduces a new American work
especially comrissioned by the
University.
Darius Milhaud," foieino'st con-
temporary French corenp ser whose
recently commissioned string quin -
tet was perforfied here July 8 by
the Stanley Quartet "With Clyde
Thompson, strin -bags, ptalsed the
groiup's perforrane a"'" onder-
ful" in a recent letter.
The musicians made a special
recording of the numib r, a
string quintet for: two violins,
viola, cello and bass, and sent it
to the composer who had been
unable to attend its premier.
The Quartet, which includes
*of. Gilbert Ross, first violinist;
Prof. Emil Raab, second violinist:
Robert Courte, violist .and Prof.
Oliver Edel, cellist; has a busy sea-
son away from the campus each
year. Traveling through the state's
upper peninsula and as far away
as Massachusetts and Washing-
td .,: D.C., the Quartet has sehed-
uled fifteen out-of-town concerts,
many of them at colleges.
The concert. tour will be culmi-
nated Jan. 16 with a performance
in the Library of Congress Cham-
bet Music Series.
MEETING
of spaghetti lavers.
If you like real Italian
Spaghetti or Ravioli drop
in anytime at
122 W. Washington
BEER * WINE . SANDWICHES

Prof. Gay Wilson Allen of New
York University's English depart-
ment yesterday explained that a
basic aesthetic conflict existed in
Walt Whitman's poetry because
the author interchangeably used
"I" to refer to himself as a specific
person and to all mankind.
Speaking before a full house in
Kellogg Auditorium, the Whitman
authority maintained, "The uni-
versal I' is better than the sen-
sual, sentimental I' and one must
view Whitman's poetry from these
Plumer to Speak
On Japanese Art
"Japanese Sculpture" will be the
subject of an illustrated lecture
to be given by Prof. James M.
Plumer of the fine arts depart-
ment, at 4:15 p.m. today at Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
The talk is in conjunction with
the Japanese Art Festival which
began Oct. 12 and will close Nov.
2. The theme of the entire festival
is a gesture of good will to Japan
with reference to the recent sign-
ing of the Japanese Peace Treaty.

standpoints in order to criticize it
validly."
* * *
THE PROFESSOR believed
that, although much is written
about Whitman, there is very lit-
tle really good criticism of the
poet's works. He felt the aesthetic
conflict was responsible, and that
the author himself made criticism{
difficult, since he believed that
"Whoever touches this book,
touches a man."
According to Prof. Allen,
Whitman was the forerunner of
the spatial-time concept which
has reached maturity in the
writings of T. S. Eliot. "In
'Leaves of Grass,'" Allen said,
"there is flowing imagery like
of a photo-montage."
"When Whitman had the per-
sonal 'I' under control, he wrote
such great poems as 'Crossing the
Brooklyn Ferry,'" he claimed.
"The study of flowing time and
spatial poems from the conflict
viewpoint reveals success or fail-
ure," the NYU professor said.
Prof. Gay stressed that the three
major symbols in Whitman's po-
etry were birth, death and resur-
rection and explained that they
were handled both in the univer-
sal and the personal sense.

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Glasses in blue felt case. Call
3568 Alice Lloyd. )23L
LOST-Black kitten from 825 E. Univer-
sity. Call 3-1429.
LOST near dining room, West Quad-
Grey topcoat. Thomas Gilmore. Will
exchange for your coat. 418 Chicago,
W.Q. )25L
LOST-Glasses in blue case on or near
Tappan St. Ph. 6922. )26L
LOST - White gold, Longine watch.
Please call 3-1561, 6569 Palmer House.
Reward. ) 28L
LOST-Red wallet near East Med. Build-
ing. Need the identification desper-
ately. Nancy Karnischky, 4008 Alice
Lloyd. )27L
FOR SALE
2 END TABLES, contemporary wrought
iron and walnut designers' models:
reasonable mahogany bowls and oil
painting. 9455. Mr. Hoffman. )2
UNIVERSITY of Michigan pottery ash
tray. Regular 1.25 Special. 75c. Bur
Patts. 1209 South University. 139'
ARMY-NAVY type oxfords $6.88. Black
and brown. Sizes 6 to 12. A to F
widths. Sams Store, 122 E. Washing-
ton St. )51
KODAK MEDALIST I 2%x3% with 50
m.m. Ektar lens, leather case, Men-
delsohn flash gun, filters, portra and
poloroid lenses, Enlarger, Federal Mo-
del 250, 21'4x3i4 with 87 m.m. F. 4.5
lens. Excellent condition. All for
$160. Call 2-4636. )47
This is the final week to
make Senior Picture ap-
pointments. You may sign
up from 1:30 to 5:30 un-
until Friday at the Student
Publications Building.

FOR SALE
NEW Navy calf pumps "Rhythm Style".
Size 71' AAA. Reasonable 3-0088. )57
ATTRACTIVE large bird cage with glass
sices-$25. Pair of young cocketiels-_
$30. Striking shelf clock. 562 S. 7th.
Ph. 5330. )58
STUDENTS-Up to t soff on diamonds,
watches, rings, electric shaver, silver-
ware, appliances and all other jewelry
items. Any nationally advertised pro-
ducts at these savings. Ph. Ed Neback,
Lit. '53, 3-1713. )59
CHEVROLET CAR. Good condition $100.
322 John St. )56
EVERGREENS
Spreading Juniper (3 kinds) $2.25-$7.50
Upright Juniper (3 kinds) $1 95-$5.00
Pyramidai Arborvitae. $2,00-$5.00
Common Arborvitae (5-7 ft.) $2.50
Mugho (Dwarf) Pine . ... $2.0b-$4.50
Scotch Pine (4-7 ft.) Youdig ... $1.95
Samples at 1422 Wash. Hts.
Call Michael Lee, 8574. )3
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS-
Reserve rooms now at rhe Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State). Phone 3-8454. )2R
FOOTBALL weekend guest rooms avail-
able. Student Room Bureau. Phone
Don Tewes, 3-8454 8 a.m.-11 p.m. )3R
LARGE double room available for male
students. 1346 Geddes Ave. )21R
FOR RENT - 2-room semi-furnished
apartment. Apply Star Cleaners, 1513
S. University, or call Ypsi Ypsi 1716.
) 22R
ON CAMPUS-3-room suite for two men.
Two study rooms plus bedroom. 1103
E. Washington. Phone 3-2612. )23R
ROOM AND BOARD
SINGLE ROOM & BOARD for research
or professional man. Also double for
two (can part pay with duties in
house). Live with congenial cultured
group on campus. 520 Thompson. )4X

TRANSPORTATION
FOR WEEKEND RIDES to Elkhart Ind.,
call 5382 Thurs., 9 p.m. )6T
HELP WANTED
HOW ABOUT a well paying job with
The Michigan Daily delivering papers.
Early hours. Phone 23-24-1.
STUDENT with radio servicing exper-
ience. Call 7942. 27R
MALE STUDENTS WANTED for 4 hour
shifts in diecasting plant either after-
noons or evenings. Call or come to
Universal Die Casting and Mfg. Corp.
232 Munroe St., Saline, Mich. Tele-
phone 280. )29H
EXPERIENCED Shoe Salesman - Part
time or full time. Willoughby Shoes,
Ypsilanti 324. )30H
YOUNG LADY to work at soda fountain
3 cr 4 nights a week from 6:00 to 10
p.m. Swift's Drug Store, 340 S. State,
Phone 2-0534. )31H
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING - Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
TAILORING, alterations, restyling. spe-
cializing in children's apparel. Accur-
ate fittings. Phone 9708. )9B
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sale and service.
Morrill's
314 S. State St., Phone 7177. )8B
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED - Double for men, close to
campus as possible. Call 220 Wenley
House W.Q. Between 7-10 p.m. )2W
MISCELLANEOUS
MAGS
at special student-faculty rates. Ph.
6007 to order or inquire. Student
Periodical Agency. )14M

0

Alpha Delta Phi Will Play Host
At" House.Presidents' Banquet
* *

T h e' annual 1Iterfraternity
Council Ibuse PreSients' banquet
will be held at 6 pm. toay at the
Alpha Delta Phi house.
Harold Jacobsen, Sigma Pi's na-
tional executive secretary for the
past 25 years, will be the main
speaker.
Jacobsen, who is active in na-
tional Interfraternity Council cir-
cles, ,wil fly out from Elizabeth,
N.J., for the function. Currently
business manager of his frater-
nity's magazine The Emerald,
Jacobsen was formerly an officer
in the fraternity editors' asso-
ciation.
Dean of Students Erich A. Wal-
ter and.Associate Dean Walter B.
Rea will be present at the dinner
which is being held this year ii
the fall-instead of spring to .en-
able house presidents to 'get to-
gether earlier.
Toastmaster will be Donn Mil-
ler, '54L, a member of Sigma Chi
fraternity. Assistant to the Dean
of 'Students, Bill Zerman, will also
speak at the affair.
India Students
The India Students Association
will meet at 8 p.m. today at the
Madelon Pound House, 1024 Hill.
This is the final week to make
Senior Picture appointments. You
may sign up from 1:30 to 5:30
until Fri. at the Student Publi-
cations Building.

}

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

HAROLD JACOBSEN
...to speak at dinner
Junior Council
Of IFC To Meet
The first junior Interfraternity
Council meeting of the semester
will be held at 4 p.m. today in
the Union.
IFC vice-president Sandy Ro-
bertson, '53 BAd., urged all pledge
class presidents to bring *class
schedules of their pledge mem-
bers to the meeting.
Carillon Concert
Sidney Giles, assistant Universi-
ty Carillonneur, will present a re-
cital at 7:15 p.m. today including
works by Victor Herbert, Rimsky-
Korsakow, von Gluck and Brahms.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Adiministration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday.)
Thursday,October 23, 1952
VOL. LXIII, No. 27
Notices
To Instructors of Engineering Fresh-
men. Five-week grades for all Engineer-
ing Freshmen are due in the Secre-
tary's Office, 263 West Engineering
Building, on Mon., Oct. 27.
Lectures
Japanese Festival. Lecture, Professor
James Marshall Plumer, "Japanese
Sculpture," Thurs., Oct. 23, 4:15 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheater.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Frank
Adolph Ecker, Political Science; the-
sis: "Transition in Asia: Uzbekistan un-
der the Soviets," Fri., Oct. 24, East
Council Room, Rackham Building, at
2 p.m. Chairman, J. H. Meisel.
Course 401, the Interdisciplinary Sem-
inar on the Application of Mathematics
to the Social Sciences, will meet on
Thurs., Oct. 23, 3409 Mason Hall, at 4:00
p.m. Mr. Stefan Vail of the Mathemat-
ics Department will speak on "Experi-
ments on Gambling and Psychological
Probability."
History 11, Lecture Group 11, Writ-
ten test Fri.. Oct. 24, 10 a.m. Sections 9,
10, 11, and 12a (Leslie, McLarty, Don-
aldson) in 1025 Angell Hall. Section 12,
13,, 14, 15 and 16 (Cassels, Slosson) in
348 West Engineering.
Applied Mathematics Seminar. Thurs.,
Oct. 23, 4 p.m., 247 West Engineering
Bulding. Speaker: Dr. J. L. Ulman.
Topic: "The Eigenvalues of a Toeplitz
Form."
Psychology Colloquium, Fri., Oct. 24,
4:15 p.m., in Auditorium D, Haven Hall
Annex. Professor Oscar Oeser of the
Department of Psychology, University
of Melbourne, Australia, will discuss
"Applications of Psychology in the De-
velopment of a New Department of
Psychology."
E rentis Tod aiv
La P'tite Causette will meet today
from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in the North Cafe-
teria of the Michigan Union.
The Weekly Graduate Record Concert
will be held in the East Lounge of Rack-
ham at 7:45 p.m.; program: Bach. So-
nata in E Major (Landowska, Menuhin);
Schubert, String Quintet in C Major
(Budapest); and Brahms, Concerto No.
2 in Bb Major for Piano and Orchestra
(Horowitz, Toscanini). All Grad stu-
dents are cordially invited.
Parliamentary Procedure. (Last one-.
hour course.) Sponsored by the League
and the Union; featuring Mr. Fred G.

Stevenson, in the Union at 8:30 p.m.
No admission. All welcome.
The Students for Stevenson Club will
meet at 8 p.m. today in the recreation
room of the Hillel Foundation Bldg.,
at 204 S. State Street. "The Humorous
Side ofBCanvassing" and "Operation
Ballot Box" will be discussed. All stu-
dents, faculty members, and guests are
invited to attend.
Hillel Coffee Hour will be held from
4 to 5 p.m. at 1429 Hill.
International Relations Club. Foreign
Policy Debate at 7:45 p.m., Angell Hall
Resolved: That the foreign policy of
the Democratic Administration has been
inadequate. Affirmative: Ned Simon-
Negative Victor Gladstone. Everyone
welcome.
Society for Peaceful Alternatives.
Meeting at the Michigan League. Fol-
lowing a business meeting, Mr. R. Fred-
rick Christman, State Chairman of the
Fellowship of Reconciliation, will speak
on "A Program for Peace."
U. of M. Sailing Club will hold a meet-
ing in 311 West Engineering. Shore
School. There will be intercollegiate sail-
ing on Sun., Oct. 26. Dues deadline Oct.
23.
Anthropology Club. Meeting at 4:30,
in 1402 Mason Hall. Program: Graduate
student reports on field work.
Political Science Coffee Hour. Thiirs.,
Oct. 23, from 4 to 5:30 at the Union.
All students invited.
International Center Weekly Tea for
foreign students and American friends,
4-6 p.m.
The Modern Dance Club will meet to-
night at 7:30 in Barbour Gymnasium.
Will the members and all others inter-
ested in the club please attend.
Ukrainian Students Club. Meeting in
the International Center, 7 p.m. Stu-
dents of Ukrainian descent are invited
to join the Club. Guests are welcome.
Alpha Phi Omega. A meeting of the
pledges will be held at 8:30 p.m., Fire-
side Room, Lane Hall. All pledges are
requested to attend.
Gilbert and Sullivan Society. Mixed
chorus rehearsal tonight at 7:15 in
Union, instead of League.
Kappa Phi. Pledging, supper, and pro-
gram at the Methodist Church at 5. All
members and pledges are requested to
be present.
Union Opera. There will be a meet-
ing of all people interested in work-
ing on production for the Union Opera
this afternoon at 4:30 in Room 3-A of
the Union.
Coming Events
Department of Astronomy. Visitors'
Night, Fri., Oct. 24, 7:30 p.m. Mr. James
E. Milligan will speak on "Between
the Planets." After the illustrated lec-
ture in 2003 Angell Hall, the Students'
Observatory on the fifth floor will be
open for telescopic obseravation of the
Moon and Jupiter, if the sky is clear,
or for inspection of the telescopes and
(Continued on Page 4)

1'

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A story of dark terror and strange lovet
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Produced, Written.and Directed by B E N H E C H T

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