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October 18, 1952 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-18

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1952

PAGE FOUR SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 195~

ACTIVE LEGISLATOR:
Energetic Leah Marks Returns to SL

The irrepressible Leah Marks
has returne donce again to the
Student Legislature.
After serving two busy years on
SL, she went into retirement last
spring when she graduated from
the literary college. Back on cam-
pus again in Law School the en-
ergetic legislator was soon working
at the SL Bldg. on an informal
basis which was made official
Wednesday night when she was
appointed by the Sabinet to a va-
cant post.
AND JUST as always, Miss
Marks managed to introduce a
motion and several amendments
on the Lecture Committee and get
intangled in numerous hot de-
bates on the subject before the
evening was over.
Yesterday she was named to
the group which will re-evalu-
ate and study SL's position on
the Lecture Committee issue.
She is also the public relations
director of the National Student
Association.
First elected to the Legislature
An April, 150, she shortly found
herself a member of the SL, the
Student Affairs Committee, The
Daily and the Young Democrats,
all at the same time.
"This was when I decided things
had gotten a little too compli-
cated," she said, "so I cut out
working for The Daily and the
YD." However, she has still been
in inveterate letter-writer to The
Daily.
* * *
PLUNGING into SL and SAC
activities, she became involved in
writing the first anti-bias clause
brief. When the plan was vetoed
in 1951 by President Alexander
Ruthven, she helped write several
o fthe anti-bias motions proposed
the following fall.
Also active on the Committee
to End Discrimination, she serv-
ed as secretary of the group
during the time it was working
on removal of potentially dis-
criminatory questions from Uni-
versity application blanks.
Hailing originally from Green-
wich, Conn., she admits to a very
uneventful early life. "I went to
a boarding school-that's where I
learned what totalitarianism is,"
she commented with a laugh.
Following this grim experience
she came to Michigan where her
capabilities brought her into the
campus spotlight in which she
seems destined to stay until she
graduates from Law School.
And then there will always be
an Alumnae Association.
'U' Parallels
Enrollment
Rise inU. S.
The University's 29 per cent in-
crease in freshman enrollment this
fall is paralleled in reports from
507 higher educational institutions
in the country, according to an
analysis made by University of
Cincinnati president Raymond
Walters.
Throughout the nation the up-
swing in freshmen college stu-
dents has checked the downward
trend of total enrollments noted
last year. Walters explained the
freshman increase in terms of
"war and economic conditions
which aredstimulating high school
pupils to go to college.
* * *
THE INCREASED freshman
trend, reported by 65 per cent of
the institutions tabulated, was
more than twice as high at the
University as at the majority of
colleges recorded.
In choosing educational pro-
grams, freshmen gave first place

to engineering and business cours-
es. Public school teaching showed
a slightly bigger enrollment, but
the smallest increase was noted in
liberal arts courses.
Most schools reported only a
tiny faction of freshmen were vet-
erans entering under the Korean
GI Bill.

U' Students
To Observe
Indian Fete
Diwali, the day of the Indian
New Year, will be celebrated to-
night by the India Students Asso-
ciation.
A representation of the myth of
Diwali in dance form, singing by
members of Le Cercle Francais,
Philippine bamboo dances and'
dances performed by Japanese stu-
dents at the University will be in-
cluded in the program to be held
at 8 p.m. at Lane Hall.
* * *
SONGS and dances performed'
by American students will also be
featured in the "Festival of Lights"
celebration.
Several myths are connected
with Diwali, a day comparable
to the American New Year,
Christmas, and Fourth of July
all in one.
The most popular myth concern-
ing Diwali is that of Narakasoor,
meaning the "Embodiment of
Evil." The story, dating far back
in prehistoric times, says that
Bhumidevi, or "Mother Earth,"
had a son Narakasoor, for whom
the gods had promised protection
from all except his mother. After
Bhumidevi died, she was reincar-
nated into the form of a woman
called Bhama.
UNAWARE of the identity of
of her own son, Bhama killed him
in a war between the forces of
good and evil. Narakasoor's final
words were that he should be for-
gotten and that the people should
rejoice at his death instead of be-
ing sorrowful.
On the day of Diwali, the peo-
ple of India distribute candies,
sweets and other choice foods to
their friends. Candles and elec-
tric lights decorate nearly all
the private and public buildings,
giving the day its name of "Fes-
tival of Lights."
a
Candles are passed from house
to house throughout the villages of
India, symbolizing the passage of
God's word throughout the world.
The Indian calendar, based on
the phases of the moon, actually
begins sometime in April, but Di-
wali is the beginning of the fiscal
year established by King Vikram
2009 years ago, and is celebrated
as the true New Year's Day.
All interested students are in-
vited to the "Festival of Lights" by
the India Student Association.
'

(Continued from Page 2)

Mathematics 220 - Classical Group.
(Prof. J. A. Dieudonne). This class will
meet on Tues., Oct. 21, at 10 a.m. in
3011 Angell Hall.
Game Theory Seminar. First meeting
on Mon., Oct. 20, 4:30 p.m., 3220 Angell
Hall.
Concert
Organ Recital by Robert Noehren,
University Organist, 4:15 Sun. after-
noon, Oct. 19, Hill Auditorium. The pro-
gram is the final one of the fall series.
It will include Bach's Fugue in E-flat
makor, Chorale Prelude. "Deck rhyself,
My Soul with Gladness," Prelude and
Jealousy Hurts
Medical Field,
Doctor Warns
"The medical profession is
threatened from within by rival-
ries and antagonisms, by hostility
and aggression," Dr. Raymond W.
Waggoner, director of the Uni-
versity Neuropsychiatric Institute,
said yesterday.
Dr. Waggoner spoke before the
Central Neuropsychiatric Associa-
tion in Nashville, Tenn. He is
retiring president of the organi-
zation.
"OUR JUDGMENTS frequent-
ly may be influenced by prejudices
of which we are consciously un-
aware," he pointed out. "With the
advent of such strong drives to-
ward socialized madicine, medical
men need to better understand
their relationship with each other
or they may well bring about that
which they most want to avoid."
He cited the rapid rise of psy-
chiatry as a factor in creating
jealousy within the profession.
"Whatever the mechanism of
professional rivalry may be," he
stated, "the important thing is
the development of some means
of overcoming it.
"It seems wise to start very early
in the medical schools and stamp
out these prejudiced attitudes,
thus neutralizing the fears and
anxieties of the students who hear
these disturbing factors," he said.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Fugue in A minor, Passacaglia and
Fugue in C minor, Pastorale, and Toc-
c.ata in F. The general public is invited.
Events Today
India Student Association. Celebrates
Diwali, The Festival of Lights, (the new
year's day) at Lane Hall from 8 p.m.
to 11 p.m. Variety program consisting
of music, dancing, and other presenta-
tions from India and other foreign
lands. Refreshments will be served. Ev-
eryone invited, 50c.
Michigan Christian Fellowship. Im-
portant meeting for all members and
interested students, 7:30 p.m., Lane Hall.
Joe Bayly, I.V.C.F. staff member who
Is our speaker for Sunday, will be with
us.
Beacon. Picnic. Lunch at 12 in League
Cafeteria. Meet for picnic at 1:30 in
at 9:30 a.m. on the Rifle Range.
Student Players. Stage Crew will meet
9:30 a.m. on the Rifle Range.
Saturday Luncheon Discussion Group,
Lane Hall, 12:15 p.m. Mrs. Marilyn Wil-
liams will speak on the topic "Faith ond
the Political Con~troversy."
Coming Events
Japanese Festival: Presentation of
gift of Japanese cherry trees from the
Tokyo Alumni by His Excellency. Eiki-
chi Araki, Japanese Ambassador. Ac-
ceptance, Dr. Harlan Hatcher. Sun., Oct.
19, 3:30 p.m. Main Lobby, Alumni Me-
morial Hall. The public is invited.
Volunteer Naval Research Reserve
Unit 9-3. Meeting on Mon., Oct. 20, 7:30
p.m., 2082 Natural Science Building.
Professor Myron H. Nichols, of the Aer-
onautical Engineering Department, will
speak on "High Altitude Research." Il-
lustrations and movies.
Hillel will hold an informal get-to-
gether on Sun., Oct. 19, from 8 to 10:30
p.m. in the Hillel Building. There will
be records, games, and refreshments.
Everyone is welcome,
International Students Association.
Council meeting Mon., Oct. 20, at 7:30
p.m. in Room 3-A of the Michigan
Union. Important agenda. Member or-
ganizations are invited to send their
delegates.
Phi Sigma , Honor Society in Biology.
Dr. Alfred S. Sussman, of the Dept. of
Botany, will speak on "The Study of
Microorganisms As a Clue to Funda-
mental Physiological Processes." Rack-
ham Amphitheater, Oct. 20, 8 p.m. Open
to the public.

L:

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Resuming.. *

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TWO-HOUR

*

-Daily-Alan Reid
ENERGETIC LEAH MARKS RETURNS TO THE SL
Advertisement, Alert Reader
Solve Keepsake Dollar ase

DRY CLEANING SERVICE
AT NO EXTRA CHARGE
Service Available
Monday through Saturday
7:00 A.M. to 7:00 P.M.*
STAR1R101 .CLEANERS *
1210 S. University *

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I

By JON SOBELOFF
A thoughtful man and a newspa-
per advertisement combined to re-
turn a keepsake silver dollar with
sentimental value to Mrs. Elaine
Eifert, 913 E. Huron St.
Gale F. Fletchall, '55M, who
bought the coin for his nine year
old son from a local bank, read
the advertisement in The Daily
and returned the keepsake to Mrs.
Eifert.
Mrs. Eifert had traced her lost
dollar to the bank where cooper-
ative tellers made a search of the
bank's silver dollar. Mrs. Eifert's
dollar, which had the initial "E"
scratched on its face, was not
among them.
Campi~us1
I. Briefs
MEETING-The annual Michi-
gan Hi-Y-Tri-Hi-Y Prelegislative
Training Conference will be held
at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. today in
the Rackham Amphitheatre.
The conference is sponsored
by the Michigan Y.M.C.A. clubs
and the Institute of Public Ad.
ministration.
Registration is scheduled for 9
a.m. in the Rackham Bldg.
TAG DAY-Preparations for the
annual Galens' Christmas Tag Day
fund drive for children at the Uni-
versity Hospital began yesterday
with appointments to the general
committee.
Chairman of the drive is Wal-
ter Kirsten, '53M.
Other workers are Jack Wil-
liams, '54M, and Mick Panzer,
'53M, assistant chairmen and Gil
McMahon, '53M, Carl Rauch, '53M,
and Shad Hartwell, '54M, as pub-
licity heads.
S* *
APPOINTMENTS-Three mem-
bers of the University staff have
been appointed to state education
study committees by Lee M. Thurs-
ton, state superintendent of public
instruction.
The newly appointed committee-
men are Prof. Howard R. Jones of
the education school, Mrs. Betty
Tableman, research worker in the
Institute of Public Administration,
and Howard C. Leibee of the phys-
ical education department.

The tellers remembered selling
several silver dollars to collectors
during the past week, although
they did not remember to whom
they had been sold. So Mrs. Eifert
inserted the following advertise-
ment in The Daily personal col-
umn: o
KEEPSAKE, REWARD-will person who
bought 1921 silver dollar, with initial
"E" on face, from State Street bank,
phone 2-2982.
"1921 is my birthday," Mrs. Ei-
fert explained. "Several times
when I was temporarily out of
money," she continued, "I left my
keepsake dollar as collateral at the
drug store where I usually stop
in the morning.
"One morning when I came back
for my dollar, I discovered that
the drug store had sent it to the
bank along with its deposits by
mistake. I followed it to the bank,
and now I have finally gotten it
back through my advertisement."
Fletchall was rewarded with an
extra dollar.
Scouts Set Up
Annual Camp
The southwest corner of Main
and Stadium Blvd. will be a cen-
ter of activity today when 300
boy scouts from the Ann Arbor va-
cinity set up camp as part of the
annual fall scout Camporee.
Beginning with a parade down
Main St. from the Court House at
9 a.m., the scouts will march with
a police escort to their two day
camp site on the grounds of the
Ann Arbor High School golf course.
After scouts set up their tents
they will give a public demonstra-
tion on various scout skills at 1
p.m.
Other activities planned for the
encampment are scout games,
church services and a performance
of Indian dances by 20 scouts from
the Jackson area during a giant
campfire to begin at 7:30 p.m. to-
day.

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING QUICK RESULTS

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REA
Daily

I

Classifieds

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Open Leter to Students' Wives

Michigan Bell Welcomes You

to Ann Arbor

If you are a former telephone operator and would
like to work while your husband attends school, come
in and see us. Every girl with previous telephone
experience is still a "telephone woman" to us, and
we can offer immediate employment to those who
are qualified.
Inquire at.
Michigan Bell Telephone Co.
323 East Washington
Only 21/2 blocks from campus

!,

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Oct. 19-Doctrine of Atonement.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M..: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister
9:45 A.M.: Student Bible Class "Leviticus."
11:00 A.M.: Church Worship, "God's World."
7:00 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild: Chapman
room. Prof. Winton Bevan of the Dept. of
Speech will lead the discussion on "The Prob-
lem of Good and Evil." .
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the pas-
tor, "When Sermonizing is Effective."
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, supper and program. Showing and dis-
cussion of TV Movie, "This is the Life."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Rev. Henry J. Kuizenga, Minister
Rev. Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
Rev. Wm. S. Baker, Student Minister
Sunday Morning Service: 9:00 and 11:00.
Henry Kuizenga preaching. "The Search for
Foundations."
No Seminar, No Guild.
Westminster Retreat Saturday October 18, 2:00;
Sunday, 4:00 P.M.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mrs. W. S. Bicknell, Parish Assistant
Mr. E. J. Schuss, Student Advisor
Miss Jane Townsend, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Adult Group. Mrs. J. T.
Rogers: Churches and Their Building Funds.
Unitarian Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Sermon: "A Decade in This Church"
by Rev. Edward H. Redman.
12:00: Coffee Hour.
6:00 P.M.: Junior AUY.
7:15 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group at the church.

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Division St.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Miss Ada Mae Ames, Counselor for Women
Students
No. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast, Canterbury House).by
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev.
W. R. Schutze.
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
3:30 P.M.: High School Club.
4:00 P.M.: Student Confirmation Class.
6:45 P.M.: Canterbury Club to meet at Canter-
bury House to go in group to Loud Lecture by
Pres. Hatcher at Methodist Church.
8:00 P.M.: Evening Prayer (Ch(3pel).
Wednesday and Thursday, 7:00 A.M.: Holy Com-
munion followed by Student Breakfast; Friday
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, D.D., Pastor
Phone 7622
Sunday-9:15 A.M.: Bible Class.
10:30 A.M.: Trinity Church-10:45 Zion Church.
4:00 P.M.: Outdoor Meeting-Meet at Center:
5:30 if weather does not permit.
Tuesday-7:30 P.M.: "Teachings of Various De-
nominations."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Discussion Class, Pine Room.
10:45 A.M.: Worship: "Between Two Worlds"
President Harlan H. Hatcher speaking.
5:30 P.M.: Supper and Fellowship.
7:00 P.M.: Worship and Program. Dr. Hatcher
will speak on "The Adventuring Mind."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenow at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin.
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS
Second Forum
10:00 A.M.: Peace Testimony and problems con-
cerning conscientious objectors.
Students are especially welcome.

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State and Huron Streets, Phone 2-1121

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