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October 18, 1952 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-18

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

U

.Michigan Seeks Second Big Ten

Win

SOGGY SETBACK:
Wildcat Clash Recalls 1925 Upset

* * *

0-

Offensive Battle Expected;
Wolverines at Full Strength
Continued from Page 1)}EWE~ igii%

By IVAN KAYE
Whenever a Michigan team in-
vades Chicago to battle Northwest-
ern it brings back to the old-timers
the memory of the classic struggle
of 1925.
The weather conditions of that
game were perhaps the worst in
the history of Big Ten football,
with the possible exception of the
Ohio State-Michigan "Battle of
the Blizzard" in 1950.
EARLY in the morning of the
Sunday preceeding the game a
light drizzle began to fall in the
Chicago area.
The rain continued without let-
up for six straight days, turning
the turf of Soldier Field into a gi-
gantic puddle.
The game site had been
changed from Evanston to Sol-
dier Field to accommodate the
tremendous number of people
who were desirous of witnessing
the momentous struggle.
Both squads were unbeaten.
Michigan had shocked the foot-
ball world one week earlier by de-
stroying a good Navy team by the
incredible score of 54-0.
THIS WAS the Michigan team
ENDS TONIGHT
' "DREAMBOAT"
- PLUS -
"PAT AND MIKE"

,I---

of Benny Friedman and Bennie
Oosterbaan. This was the Michi-
gan team of the immortal Field-
ing Yost, then in his 24th year on
the Ann Arbor campus. This was
the ball club which at season's end
was to boast the enviable record
of never having its goal line
crossed.
Northwestern was blessed with
one of the biggest lines in the
history of Wildcat football. The
Purple had a great quarterback
and captain in Tim Lowry and
an accurate place-kicker in
Tiny Lewis.
Over 90,000 tickets had been,
sold but only 40,000 braved the
wind-driven rainstorm to see the
game. This in itself was a tribute
to the drawing power of the two
teams.
FOR THE FIRST twelve min-
utes of the game, both1 squads
sloshed back and forth, unable to
make a first down. With Michi-
gan in possession on its own eigh-
teen, Friedman fumbled and Bar-
ney Mathews recovered for North-,
western.
Realizing the futility of trying
to run unders such conditions,
captain Lowry decided to call
upon Tiny Lewis to kick a field-
goal. He was successful and the
Purple took a 3-0 lead. A three-
point cushion on that field pre-
sented practically an insur-
mountable obstacle to the trail-
ing team, and the Wildcats deft-j
ly protected their margin.
The elements and the North-
western defense conspired to check
the Michigan advance until the
early moments of the final period
when the Wolverines began a
march from their own 34 yard
line. They drove to the Wildcat
four, at which point the attack
bogged down in the impassable,
mud.
* * *
NORTHWESTERN took over
and desperately tried to gain
ground, but fourth down found theI
ball only on the eight. Captain
Lowry realizing that a bad punt
would give the game to Michigan,
took the pass from center, retreat-

ed over his own goal line, downed
the ball and gave the Wolverines
two points.
Under the rules, the Wildcats
were then entitled to a free kick
from their own twenty yard
line. The ball was booted past
midfield and the Wolverines were
checked until the final gun, thus
proving the wisdom of Lowry's
move.
The final score was Northwest-
ern 3, Michigan 2 and the contest
has long been referred to as "The
Baseball Game" by sportswriters.
* * *
MICHIGAN bounced back to
win the rest of the games on its
schedule and capture the Big Ten
championship. The Wildcats grew
over-confident and fell victim to
Ohio State and Illinois, both of
which were beaten by the Wolver-
ines.
The freak defeat of the
Maize and Blue did not detract
one bit from the esteem in which
it was held by the nation's grid-
iron experts. The New York
Times called the 1925 squad,
"Yost's greatest modern foot-
ball team." The final tally
showed Michigan the popular
choice as the nation's best team.
The Wolverines wound up with
seven wins in eight games and a
point score of 227 as against only
the three registered by the North-
western fieldgoal.
* * *
YET AS GREAT a team as was
Michigan, there emblazened on
their otherwise spotless record
stood that weird setback at the
hands of an inferior Northwestern
team.
Perhaps this only serves to show
the true nature of football, that
past records and strength on paper
are out the window when the
weather takes a hand in deter-
mining the final outcome. The
same can be said with even great-
er emphasis about psychological
attitude.-'
Today, 27 years after this mem-
orable contest, the Wolverines and
Wildcats will go at it again in the
27th chapter of their never-dull
rivalry.

while high-stepping Frankie How-
ell will back up Branoff.
THE WOLVERINE forward wall
on offense will be Lowell Perry
and Tad Stanford on the flanks,
Dick Strozewski and Ben Peder-
son at tackle, 'and Dick Beison
and Bob Timm at the guard slots.
Dick O'Shaughnessy will put the
ball into play for the Blue.
The offensive unit, which has
moved the ball well thus far in
the young season, is slated to
have an enjoyable afternoon,
judging by the tremendous yard-
age the Northwestern defense
has allowed its opponents in
three losing contests.
It may be another story for the
Wolverine defensive squad, which
has looked wobbly even in victory.
To try and stop Hren, who sank
Michigan last year with a 17 yard
scoring jaunt, the Wolverines will
call on linebackers Rog Zatkoff
and Laurie LeClaire to support the
forward wall.
* * *
CAPTAIN Merritt Green and
Gene Knutson will man the de-
fensive ends. Green is still oper-
ating on a weakened ankle, but it
is not expected to keep him out
of action.
Defensive tackles will be Art
Walker and rugged Jim Balog.
The vulnerable guard posts will
see Bob Matheson, Don Dugger,
Ted Cachey and Red Williams pa-

ROGER ZATKOFF
... tackling terror
SPORTS
NEIL BERNSTEIN, Night Editor

BOB HURLEY
... potent plunger
rading in and out throughout the
game.
In the defensive backfield Dave
Tinkham is situated at left half.
His defending partner at the other
half will be either Howell, Don
Oldham or extra-point-kicker Russ
Rescorla. Perry and Oldham will
probably alternate at safety.
The game is the twenty-seventh
i na 60-year series. Michigan has
won 16, lost eight, and tied two
going into today's tilt. On the last
trip here four years ago North-
western edged Michigan in a
thriller, 21-20.

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Favored Michigan State Faces Syracuse

PLUSI

Lutherans, Actuaries Triumph
In IndependentGrid Contests

By JIM DYGERT
Bob Saria tossed two touchdown
passes to lead the Lutheran Stu-
dent Center to a 20-6 victory over
the International Center in I-M
football yesterday.
Jim Wiggert caught a pass from
Saria to start the scoring in the
first half. Frank Norman inter-
cepted a pass and ran 30 yards to

v

-- i,

ON SATURDAY NIGHT
It's Topflight .. .
DANCING
of the Union Balroom ... 9-12

paydirt to give LSA a halftime
advantage of 13-0. Olin Storvick
scored the extra point.
IN THE SECOND half, Saria
threw a pass to Storvick for an
insurance touchdown.
The Actuaries completed reg-
ular play with a perfect record
by whipping Canterbury, 18-6.
The big gun for the Actuaries
was Joe Byrne who passed for
two touchdowns and scored an-
other on a pass from Shell Capp.
Byrne tossed an aerial to Capp
who scampered 30 yards for the
first score.
*5 * *
STANDISH-EVANS swept over
Roger Williams, 26-0, in the day's
highest scoring affair. Ron Schaef-
fer sparked Standish-Evans to tri-
umph with two touchdown passes
to Bob Hardies in the first half
and two more in the second half,
one. each to Roland Zagnoli and
Bob Stevens.
Schaeffer also scored the extra
point after the third touchdown
on an end run. In the last min-
ute of play, he intercepted a pass
at midfield and returned the ball
to the one-yard line to set up
his touchdown pass to Stevens.
Wesleyan nosed out a strong
Michigan Fellowship team, 12-6.
Jerry Church threw two touch-
down passes to Jim Watson, one
in each half, to account for the
victory.

By the Associated Press
Michigan State's three back-
fields will be dueling each other
for scoring honors again today.
A Syracuse team, rated as one
of the best produced by theseast-
ern school in years, will provide
the opposition.
THE PRE-GAME prediction is
that Syracuse, which will dress
only 35 men, will put up a stiff
fight for at least the first half.
But Michigan State's mass of
manpower is expected to over-
whelm Syracuse by the third or
fourth quarter and this could be
anothersscoring spree for the
Spartans.
Syracuse already has had a
sample of the kind of football
they teach at Michigan State.
BOLLING FIELD Air Force elev-
en quarterbacked by Al Dorow, the
former MSC backfield boss, hand-
ed Syracuse its only defeat of the
season in the opener for the Or-
angemen.
Michigan State Coach Biggie
Munn, who has dozens of good
backs crowding each other on
the bench, will alternate three
offensive backfields.
The first platoon is quarter-
backed by Tom Yewcic and has
power backs Don McAuliffe and
Vince Pisano at the halfs and
Wayne Benson at fullback. All but
Yewcic are seniors..
* * *
THE SECOND PLATOON, also
directed by Yewcic, has speed mer-
chants Leroy Bolden and Billy
Wells as halfbacks and either
Dick Panin or Evan Slonac at full-
back.
Bolden and Wells are second
and third in rushing yardage for
Michigan State this season. ,
Munn's third combination has
pass expert Willie Thrower at
quarterback, sophomores Bert Za-
gers and Bernie Raterink at the

halfs and Jerry Musetti, a fresh-
man, at fullback.
In other Big Ten games, Illinois
is favored to hand Minnesota its
first conference defeat and Wis-
consin is spitted against Iowa at
Iowa City. '
Illinois bounced back from its
trimming by Wisconsin with a 48-
14 crushing of Washington, a team
that defeated Minnesota 19-12.
* *5 *
WHILE MINNESOTA is capable
of spring an upset, Iowa appears a
cinch to take a fourth straight
pasting from Wisconsin. The
Hawkeyes have bowed to Pitt, 26-
14; Indiana, 20-13; and Purdue,
41-14.
Purdue, unbeaten in two con-
ference starts against Ohio State
and Iowa, has the toughest as-
signment among three non-Big
Ten games.
The Boilermakers take on an in-
consistant Notre Dame squad at
Lafayette, Indiana. A decisive vic-
tory by Purdue can establish it
firmly in the national ratings.
However, Notre Dame, with all its
ups and downs, is always danger-
ous.
* * *
OHIO STATE, after knocking
Wisconsin out of the Western Con-
ference lead, encounters a winless
but potentially troublesome Pa-
cific Coast rival in Washington
State.
Also, Indiana is expected to
easily take the measure of Tem-
ple at Bloomington.
Moving on to other sections
of the country, the struggle
between once-tied, high-scoring
Oklahoma and unbeaten, untied
and defensively strong Kansas
looks like THE game of the Big
Seven season-at least until Ne-
braska gets into the act later.
And Nebraska may have its
troubles in the East against Penn

.4

State, which tied Purdue earlier,
and decisively beat West Virginia.
* * *
THE NEIGHBORHOOD battle
between Navy and Maryland is a
natural. The second-ranked Mary-
land team showed ,awe-inspiring
power against Georgia, but Navy
this year has put up an impene-
trable defense against lesser ri-
vals.{
In the NCAA television Game
of the Week, Cornell, the team
which upset Michigan, 20 to 7,
last year at Ithaca, takes on a
strong Yale squad.
Jack Jaeckel, who engineered
Cornell's T formation upset of the
Wolverines, will be back in the
quarterback slot. The squad, oth-
erwise, is a largely rebuilt one, hav-
ing lost 26 lettermen at the close
of the campaign.
* * *
CORNELL suffered another se-
rious blow just before the season
started when Halfback Billy Whel-
an received a broken collar bone
in a scrimmage.
But he will be back Saturday.
Sorely missed in 'the Big Red's
first three games, Whelan re-
turned to the lineup long enough
to do the punting against Syr-
acuse last week and he is expect-
ed to carry a full offensive load
against Yale.
Yale features a coach who had
the head coaching job thrust on
him at the last moment, Jordan
Olivar. So far this season, Olivar
has guided the Bulldogs to three
victories in their first four starts
-more games than the squad won
all last season.

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