100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 07, 1952 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 195?

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1952

Ike, Adlai Sundaes Introduced Here

j.JuLo oui a jJv uo o r -Daily-Ken Tootell
rhus it would appear that ice- IKE SPECIAL-Jim Hogan, '54, bites into an Ike Sundae currently
eam eaters are quite representa- being featured along with Adlai Sundaes at a local ice cream
e of the student body in their shop. Both campaign concoctions have the same ingredients, but
litical affiliations. This might with each sundae the customer gets a free Democratic or Repub-
significant. lican good-luck charm.
Academic Freedom Essay
Contest Offered to Seniors

Any senior with good ideas on
"The Meaning of Academic Free-
dom" and a knowledge of how to
write them up into a 2,500 word or
less essay is eligible for a national
contest involving $5,000 in prizes.
Sponsored by the National
Council of Jewish Women, Inc., the
Korean GI Bill
PaymentsHeld Up
Veterans planning to go to
school under the Korean GI Bill
were advised by the local Veterans
Administration office to take
enough money along to cover ex-
penses for the first two months.
Guy F. Palmer, manager of the
Veterans Administration regional
.office in Detroit, explained that
GI education and training allow-
ances cannot be paid until some-
time after a veteran actually com-
pletes each month of training.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

THE HOME OF, GOOD FOOD
928 South State
IS SERVING BUSINESS MEN'S AND
STUDENTS' SPECIALS
from 11:30 to 1:30 daily except Monday - 65c
DINNERS and SMORGASBORD
from 5 until 8 - Sundays 12 until 6:30

college essay contest opened Sept.
15 and will close Dec. 31.
* * *
ENTRIES will be judged by a
group of five distinguished men
including: Supreme Court Justice
William O. Douglas; Ralph
Bunche, director of the Trustee-
ship Division of United Nations
and recipient of a 1950 Nobel
Peace Prize; Mrs. Douglas Horton,
former president of Wellesley Col-
lege; Abram L. Sachar, president
of Brandeis University; and for-
mer associate justice of the United
States Court of Appeals, Thurman
W. Arnold.
Winning essays will be an-
nounced on or about April 15.
Cash awards of $2,500 for the
first prize winner, $1,000 for sec-
ond place, and $500 each for
third, fourth and fifth prizes
will be distributed thes.
The sponsors list the following
rules for entries:
1. Any senior in any national
college or university is eligible, ex-
cept those associated with the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women.
2. Typewritten, double-spaced
manuscripts must be sent by first
class mail to Essay Contest, Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women,
One West 47th St., New York, 36,
N.Y.
3. Every entry must be accom-
panied by a printed certificate of
authorship enclosed in a sealed en-
velope and clipped to the unsigned
manuscript. Certificates and fur-
ther infromation about the con-
test are available at the Scholar-
ship Office, 113 Admistration Bldg.
'U' elevisioq
Prograi Set
For the third year the University
is offering college courses via tele-
vision over WWJ-TV, Detroit;
WJIM-TV, Lansing; and WKZO-
TV, Kalamazoo.
Science will be emphasized in
the opening courses. Half-hour
weekly lessons in "Modern Phys-
ics," a 15-week course, and "Un-
derstanding Our Natural Re-
sources," a seven-week course,
will inauguarte the fall semester.
The resorces program will be fol-
lowed by an eight-week course in
understanding music.
Prof. Ernest F. Barker, chairman
of the physics department will
deal with the atom and atomic en-
ehgy, light and radio waves, radar
and the use of the electron micro-
scope.
Use and waste of natural re-
sources will be discussed by Prof.
Shirley W. Allen of the forestry
department in the seven week tele-
course. Forests, minerals, water
and wildlife will be included in his
list of subjects.

Corruption
Theme Hit
By Douglas
By CRAWFORD YOUNG
Special To The Daily
DETROIT-Sen. Paul Douglas
(D-Ill) lashed out with a strong
counterattack on the corruption
issue before a crowd of 1,200 at a
Volunteers for Stevenson rally in
the Masonic Temple Sunday night.
The silver-haired Senator out-
lined a three-point anti-corrup-
tion program, while chiding the
Republicans for "taking all the
money while the Democrats took
all the blame."
* * *
AS A CURE for bad ethical
practices in government, the for-
mer economics professor recom-
mended:
1) A code of official behavior,
prohibiting the acceptance of
costly gifts and entertainment.
2) A two year "delousing per-
iod" for public executives before
they are permitted to deal with
their former employers.
3) A similar cleansing interval
of two years before former gov-
ernment officials returned to pri-
vate life could involve themselves
in business with the government.
SEN. DOUGLAS was critical of
a "certain negligence" on the part
of the present administration in
purging itself of dishonesty in
public office.
However, he lauded Gov. Ad-
lai Stevenson as the candidate
who could perform the cleanup,
citing examples during his ad-
ministration in Illinois where
Democrats responsible for the
horsemeat and cigarette tax
scandals had been fired.
Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower was
characterized by the Senator as a
"fine, innately decent gentleman,"
who had married into a bad fam-
ily, then found the in-laws taking
over.
"Mother-in-law Bob (Taft) did
not at first approve of the match,
but later, there was the reconcili-
ation on the love seat while the
poor general sat meekly by and
let mother-in-law read off a
statement that they were seeing
eye to eye," Sen. Douglas said.
Plans Offered
To Apportion
Legislature
(Continued from Page 1)
districts would be determined on
a population basis by dividing
the number of people in Michi-
gan by 100, with one represen-
tative for each unit of the divi-
sion.
This plan, as opposed to pro-
posal 2, retains the "moiety"
clause.
Under proposal 3, then, Wayne;
County would have between 32 and,
38 members.
* * *
ANOTHER substantial differ-
ence between the two proposals
is that proposal 2 has a force
clause which provides for mada-
tory readjustment of the House
and Senate every 10 years on the
basis of the decinnial census. The
responsibility for this is taken,
from the Legislature and given to
the Secretary of State.
On the other hand, proposal 3£
leaves the obligation of reappor-
tioning the House every =ten
years to the Legislature.
Many claim that proposal 2 is ,

the answer to what they consider
an over representation of rural
areas. This group claims that plan
2 is more democratic because it
gives the urban, industrialized
areas what they consider long due
adequate representation.
Those who favor proposal 3
say that it follows the accepted
American principal of popula-
tion representation in thelower
house and area representation
in the upper.
Some advocates of proposal 3
protest that proposal 2 fails to
give consideration to economic in-
terests. They claim that proposal
2 would give complete control of
the state's legislative processes to
pressure groups, such as labor.
Others don't like either plan,
but no other alternative has as
yet been submitted for the ballot.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building betore 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1952
VOL. LXIII, No. 13
Notices
University Directory changes of ad-
dress and phone number must be re-
ported not later than Tues., Oct. 14.
Blue Cross, Group Hospitalization and
Surgical Service. During the period
from Oct. 6 through Oct. 17, the Uni-
versity Personnel Office (3012 Admin-
istration Building) will accpet new ap-
plications as well as requests for
CHANGES IN CONTRACT NOW IN EF-
FECT. These new applications and
changes become effective Dec. 5, with
the first payroll deduction on Nov. 30.
After Oct. 17, no new applications or
changes can be accepted until April,
1953.
Lectures
Sigma Xi Lecture. "The Natural His-
tory of Yellow Fever," Dr. Marston
Bates, Professor of Zoology, Wed., Oct.
8, 8 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater. Pub-
lic cordially invited.
Academic Notices
Graduate Students expecting to re-
ceive the master's degree in Feb., 1953,
must file a diploma application with
the Recorder of the Graduate School by
Fri., Oct. 10. A student will not be rec-
ommended for a degree unless he has
filed formal application in the office
of the Graduate School.
Make-up exam in history, Sat., Oct.
11, 9-12 a.m. Obtain permission from
your instructor, then sign list in His-
tory Office, 3601 Haven Hall.
Mathematics Colloquium will be held
on Tues., Oct. 7, at 4:10, 3011 Angell
Hall. The speaker is Prof. George Piran-
ian, Title-"On a Construction of Lusin
and Privaloff,"
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54 Make-Up Final
Thurs., Oct. 16, 3:15, 207 Economics
Building.
Seminar in Hilbert Spaces. First meet-
ing Tues., Oct. 7, 7:30, 247 West En-
gineering.
Logic and Foundations Seminar.
Tues., Oct. 7, at 3:10, 3001 Angell Hall.
Dr. Buchi will speak on Wemeny's pa-
per "Models of Logical Systems."
Organic Chemistry Seminar Tues.,
Oct. 7, 7:30 p.m., 3005 Chemistry Build-
ing. Dr. R. C. Elderfield will speak on
"Certain Anionic Substitution Reac-
tions."
Geometry Seminar, Wed., Oct. 8. 4:15,
3001 Angell Hall. Mr. D. Kazarinoff will
speak on Villarceau circles.
Concert
Richard Tucker, tenor, of the Metro-
politan Opera, will give the first con-
cert in the Choral Union Series, Wed.
evening, Oct. 8, at 8:30, in Hill Audi-
torium-accompanied at the piano by
Joseph Blatt.
Mr. Tucker will present the following
program: Handel's "Where'er You Walk"
from "Semele"; "Sound an Alarm" from
"Judas Maccabaeus" by Handel;' "II
mio tesoro" from "Don Giovanni"'(Mo-
zart); "E lucevan" from "Tosca" (Puc-
cni); Apres un reve (Faure); "Le temps
des Lilas" (Chausson); Flower Song
from "Carmen" (Bizet); "Fall In"' (Le-
oni); Roving Gambler and Gambler's
Lament (John Jacob Niles); and
"Spring Came" by Edwin McArthur.
The opening concert in the Extra
Series will be given by Rise Stevens,
also of the Metropolitan Opera, on Fri.,
Oct. 17, at 8:30 o'clock.
Events Today
Students for Stevenson. All those de-
siring rides to hear and see Gov. Ste-
venson today, 2:30, meet in front of the
Union betweejn 1 and 1:45.
Human Relations Committee Meeting
at 4:15, Student Legislature Building.
All those who are interested in working
on this committee are urged to attend.

Science Research Club. The October
meeting will be held in the Rackham
Amphitheater at 7:30 p.m. Program:
Metal Chelate Compounds-Robert W.
Parry, Chemistry; Stress, the Diseas-
William Q. Wolfson, Medicine; Pitui-
tary-Adrenal System, and Human and
election of new members.
Young Republicans, Young Demo-
crats, Students for Stevenson, and Ei-
senhower for President clubs are joint-
ly sponsoring a foreign-policy debate
entitled "Resolved that the foreign pol-
icy of the last 7 years has worked to
the benefit of the American people,"
at 8 p.m. in Auditorium D, Angell
Hall Extension. Speakers will be
Professor Preston Slosson, representing
the Stevenson group and upholding the
affirmative, and George W. Salade, rep-
resenting the Eisenhower group and
the negative. All Independents, Repub-
licans, and Democrats are cordially in-
vited.
U. of M. Rifle Club will meet at 7:15
p.m. at the R.O.T.C. Rifle Range.
Debate Team Organizational Meeting,
for members and anyone interested in
debating and discussion, 7:30 p.m., 4203
Angell Hall.Prevous experience not nec-
essary.
Ballet Club. Classes tonight in Bar-
oour Gym Dance Studio for all inter-
ested men and women students. Inter-
mediates, 7:15-8:15; beginners, 8:15-
9:15.
Christian Science Organization: Tes-
simonia meeting, 7:30 p.m., Upper
Room, Lane Hall.
Students for Democratic Action.
There will be a meeting at 7:30 p.m. in
the Union. Elections will definitely be
held tonight.
Congregational Disciples Guild. Tea
at Guild House, 4:30-6:00 p.m. 7:15-8:15,
first of nine meetings to study the
book of Luke. Prof. Weaver Will con-
duct the first meeting.
J-Hop Committee meeting will be
held at 5 p.m., 3-K, Michigan Union.
Square Dance Group meets at Lane
Hall, 7:30 p.m. Opportunity for instruc-
tion, 7:00-7:30 p.m. All interested stu-
dents welcome.
Coming Events
Attention All Sophomore Women.
Mass organizational meeting for Sopho-
more Cabaret in the League, Wed., Oct.
8, at 7:30. Please be there as there is
something for everyone to do.
Undergraduate Botany Club will hold
its first meeting Wed., Oct. 8, at 7:30
p.m., 1139 Natural Science Building. Mr.
Edward Voss, teaching fellow, Depart-
ment of Botanry, will show slides of
plant life in northern Michigan and a
colored film entitled "Michigan Wil-
derness." Refreshments and a chance
to get acquainted. Everyone welcome,
regardless of class level or field of con-
centration.
First Baptist Church, World Under-
standing Institute, Wed., 8 p.m. Mr.
Harold Onubagu of Nigeria will speak
on "The Future of Africa." All Bap-
tist students are welcome.
Roger Williams Guild. "Midweek
Chat," Wed., Oct. 8, 4:30-5:45.
Canterbury Club. Holy Communion, 7
a.m., Wed., followed by breakfast at
Canterbury House.
The Young Republican Club will hold
a meeting in the second floor Terrace
Room of the Union at 8 p.m. Wed. Elec-
tions will be held to fill the offices bf
President, Vice-President, and Treas-
urer. Old members and prospective
members are urged to attend.
Faculty and Graduate Students of
Sociology Department, general orien-
tation meeting 7:30 p.m., Wed., Oct. 8,
Michigan Room of the League. Refresh-
ments.
STNit
Ending Tonight

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 ,60 1.34 1.96
3 70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Keys in vicinity of Natural
Science Bldg. Please return to Chem
Office or Ph. 2-7328 )8L
FOR SALE
2 END TABLES, contemporary wrought
iron and walnut designers' models:
reasonable mahogany bowls and oil
painting. 9455, Mr. Hoffman. )2
UNDERWOOD portable typewriter in
good condition. Phone 2-2377 between
1-3 p.m. or evenings. )25
CUSHMAN Scooter in fine condition.
$100.00. Ph. 7759. )26
TWO CHORAL UNION season tickets
first row, first balcony, center. Fifteen
dollars each. Reply Box 1. )27
COMPLETE SET of darkroom and pho-
tographic equipment. Includes en-
larger, print box, camera developing
tanks. Best offer accepted. Call 25644,
Dick Huff evenings. )29
ENGLISH WOOL for sale cheap. Five
yards hand-woven tweed, worsted
enough for man's suit. Ph. Kutsche,
3-8506. )32
EVERGREENS
Spreading Juniper (3 kinds) $2.25-$7.50
Upright Juniper (3 kinds) $1.95-$5.00
Pyramidal Arborvitae. $2.00-$5.00
Common Arborvitae (5-7 ft.) .. $2.50
Mugho (Dwarf) Pine ......$2.00-$4.50
Scotch Pine (4-7 ft.) Youdig ....$1.95
Samples at 1422 Wash. Hts.
Call Michael Lee, 8574.H)3
TAILS and accessories, size 38-40. $20.00.
Excellent condition. Bob Benson 2-3776.
)30
MAG NEWSSTAND SSSR*
Colliers 150 7% c
Life 20c 9c
Look' 15c ! c
SatEvePost 15c lOc
Time 20c 6c
*Special Student Subscription Rate.
Phone 6007, Student Periodical. )31
ROOMS FOR RENT
FOOTBALL weekend guest rooms avail-
able. Student Room Bureau. Phone
Don Tewes, 3-8454 8 a.m.-11 p.m. )3R
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS-
Reserve rooms now at The Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State). Phone 3-8454. )2R
COMFORTABLE SUITE for two men.
Prefer graduate students. Call after
5:30 at 1402 Hill. )lOR
SINGLE ROOM-Hollywood bed, maid
service, hot plate privileges, refrigera-
tor privileges, modern bathroom facili-
ties, near campus. Call2-7108 and ask
for John Black, )8R
LARGE DOUBLE ROOM, 126 Packard.
Tel. 3-1873. Five blocks from campus,
one block from Main. )13R

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

ROOMS FOR RENT
LARGE Double Room - Will rent as
single. 1346 Geddes Ave. MnR
SUITE OF DOUBLE ROOMS for 4 boys,
with kitchen and private entrance.
One block from campus. Call 2-7330.
3 to 4:30 p.m.,, )12R
PERSONAL
KEEPSAKE, REWARD-Will person who
bought 1921 silver dollar, with initial
"E" on face, from State Street bank,
phone 2-2982.
HELP WANTED
PART TIME student help wanted. Apply
Camelot Bros., 1119 S. University. )17H
WANTED-Piano accordian teacher to
teach beginners. Studio in store. Ap-
ply to Mr. Hand at Grinnell's, 323
S. Main. )18H
NEED 3 or 4 apple pickers after or be-
tween classes. Experience preferred.
Phone Whitmore Lake 5601, John
Mitacek, 9385 Spencer Rd. )7H
CAMPUS GIRLS interested in extra
money. Beauty counselors can use 25
snappy, peppy co-eds to sell lipstick.
deodorants etc. in spare time.. Call
2-1729. )20H
WANTED-Male student to clean small
apt. on Sat. Morns. Phone Univ., Ext.
373, or evenings 2-3547. )19H
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters! portable and standard for
rent, sale and service.
MORRILL'S
314 S. State St., Phone 7177 )8B
WASHING - Finished work, and hand
ironing, Ruff dry and wet wa.shing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
GOOD Rental Typewriters available at
reasonable rates. Office Equipment
Company, 215 E. Liberty. Phone 2-1213.
)4B
WANTED TO RENT
ONE CAR GARAGE wanted, preferably
near Hill and State. Call 3-4187. )1W
MISCELLANEOUS
PLAYTIME CARE OF CHILDREN
in my home. Educational toys, play-
ground equipment. Sat. also. Phone
3-1037, )1M
Cinexma SL Guild
Architeeture Aud.
"A Mae West wbo
really means it!"
'TIMI
jenny
w5ongs,semubtle
wit Recrt mended
Fri. and Sat.
Continuous from 5:30 P.M.
Complete shows at
5:30, 7:15, 9:30

CLASSIFI E S

I

I

w.

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

. -..U

.

11

115 W. Liberty Phone 8950
HOBBYSHOP
Headquarters for Model and Hobby Supplies
--Model Airplanes -Model Railroad Kits
-Airplane Motors -Locomotives
-Old Time Cars --Hobby Tools
-Model Race Cars --Balsa Wood
-Ship Models -Plexiglas
RELAX WITH A HOBBY
New Monogram Model Contest Ends Nov. 1 st
- Come In and Ask Us About It -

"Represents education
that contrnue s, t
says GEORGE GALLUP
Founder of the American Institute of Public Opinion; formerly
Professor, Pulitzer School of Journalism, Columbia U.
"A serious weakness of the American
educational system is the missing link
between what we are taught in school and
what we learn after leaving school. The
Reader's Digest represents education that
continues. It arouses and satisfies keen
interest in the vital issues of the day
and in varied fields of lasting knowledge."

A

READ
and
USE
Daily
Classifieds

I

/HERE'S FUNI MosJt61Mme lgg
discfrery since "Mikkyg,.
41.04MPICTURE .' bw C
cassCARPENTER b-u WVNN
-- FEARLESS FACAN cam
Tomorrow, Wednesday
SHELLEY WINTERS
"MY MAN AND I"

Phone 5651
Now Playing

An Intimate Theatre
Bringing Cinema Triumphs
From All Nations

"FROM THE OPENING SHOT
'The Stranger in Between' is packed with suspense."
-N.Y. Daily News

1

Resuming.

"Director Charles Crichton of
'The Lavender Gill Mob' again
has done a candy job."
-N. Y. Times
"One of the best pictures I've
seen." -Journal American
"A suspense filled movie!"

"the

Open Letter to Students' Wives
Michigan Bell Welcomes You
to Ann Arbor
If you are a former telephone operator and would
like to work while your husband attends school, come
in and see us. Every girl with previous telephone
experience is still a "telephone woman" to us, and
we can offer immediate employment to those who

. TWO-HOUR
DRY CLEANING SERVICE
AT NO EXTRA CHARGE

*
*
*
*
*
*

stranger
in

Look at the wide range of subjects in any issue-The
Reader's Digest is designed for the well-rounded individual
who cultivates interests far wider than the confines of any
particular field.
From the wealth of material thht is published each month,
the editors select those outstanding articles no thoughtful
person would want to miss. Each article is condensed to
present the essentials clearly, yet preserve the full content

Service Available

IIMondav thrnioh Satiii-caxr1

I ,

1111

I

11 I

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan