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October 05, 1952 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1952-10-05

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAG THREE

M'

Gridde rs

Hum bled

Again

New York Bounces Back to Even Series
As Mize, Reynolds Shine in 2-0 Victory

I

FOOTBALL ROUND JP:
Wisconsin, Notre Dame
Score Upset Triumphs

NEW YORK - (R) - Wisconsin
took a long stride toward the Rose
Bowl by humbling favored Illinois;
today, 20-6, but it was Notre.Dame
which struck the most staggering
blow of the second -big week of
college football.
The Fighting Irish, tied 7-7 by
Pennsylvania a week ago, bounc-
ed back with vengeance to upset
Texas' speedy Longhorns, fifth
ranked in the Associated Press
poll, 14-3.
THE GAME at Austin high-
lighted an important program of
intersectional conflicts which vied
with the World Series for the at-
tention of the nation's sports fans.
Michigan State, rated the na-
tion's No. 1 team, barely man-
aged to win 17-14 over Oregon
Y State in the final two seconds on
a field goal by end- Eugene Le-
kenta.
Except for the defeat of Texas
and Illinois, the latter No. 2 na-
tionally, and the terrific scare
handed Michigan State, the top
ten of college football came off
the various gridirons without mis-
hap:
s :
MARYLAND, California, South-
ern California, Kansas and Duke
also prevailed in a day of few
form reversals.
Maryland's Terrapins, unbeat-
en last year and winners over
Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl,
protected their No. 3 rating with
an easy 28-0 triumph over Clem-
son in the so-called "Suspension
Bowl." Both teams were ousted
from the Southern Conference
for a year for {playing in New
Year's day games against orders.
California, No. 4, whipped Min-
nesota, 49-13. Southern Cal., No.
7, turned back an improving Army
r eleven at Los Angeles, 22-0. Kan-
sas, No. 9, moved into a com-
manding position in the Big Sev-
en Conference by toppling Colo-
rado, 21-12, on Charlie Hoag's
three touchdowns. Duke, No. 10,
held mighty Tennessee to two first
downs in stoppin gthe Volunteers,
7-0.
WISCONSIN carried a No. 8
national ranking into the game at
Madison, Wis., against Illinois' de-
fending Big Ten Champions. Roo-
kie quarterback Jim Haluska pass-
ed to one touchdown and directed

his mates to two others in a slash-
ing attadk before a crowd of
52,071.
The Illini are ineligible to re-
turn to the Rose Bowl, having
played there a year ago. The
Badgers, on the other hand, are
not only eligible but eager. They
become the No. 1 favorite after
today's victory. .
At Austin, Johnny Lattner and
Joe Heap put a new spark in
Notre Dame which made the team
look like the Fighting Irish of old.
WingWin
Rochester - The Rochester
Red Wings won the Little
World Series last night, by
beating the Kansas City Blues
for the third straight time, 6 to
4.
The Wings, managed by ex-
big league star Harry Walker
scored all of their runs in the
first two .innings, knocking out
Kansas City hurling ace Eddie
Erautt. and capturing the best-
f-seven series after being down
three games to one.
Behind 0-3, they collaborated for
two last half touchdowns to bring
the surprising victory.
* * *
IN THE East, Princeton stretch-
ed the sport'is longest current win-
ning streak to 24 games by over-
powering Rutgers, 61-19.
Oregon State, beaten only
by Michigan State a year ago,
again proved . troublesome for
the Midwestern powerhouse,
The Cougars pounced on a fum-
ble in the last period and drove
44 yards to tie the score at 14-14.
Lekenta's field goal, providing the
margin of victory, was in the air
when the final gun sounded. It
was that close.
* * , *
IN OTHER main intersectional
games, Stanford won over Michi-
gan, 14-7; Navy crushed Cornell,
31-7; Oklahoma whipped Pitts-
burgh, 49-20, Tulane smothered
Santa Clara, 35-0, and Vanderbilt
held Northwestern to an unex-
pected 20-20 tie.
Midwestern activity saw Purdue
top Ohio State, 21-14; Indiana
squeeze past Iowa, 20-13, and Ne-
braska down Iowa State, 16-0.

Stribe Hurt,
Star Tackle
Hospitalized
(Continued from Page 1)
where the Wolverines were sup-
posed to excell. '.
Michigan's one scoring thrust
started late in the first period
from the Wolverine 28. During it
Toper passed eight yards to half-
back Ted Kress. Kress tossed six
to Topor and again to right end
Thad Stanford for nine.
A 31-yard run around left end
by Kress behind solid blocking put
the bal on Stanford's 20. Def en-
sive holding against Stanford la-
ter advanced the ball to the In-
dian six. But a Michigan offside
moved it back to the 11. Topor
then passed to Perry who ran five
yards for the score.
THE GAME was marked by ex-
cessive fumbling, Michigan bobbl-
ing six times to Stanford's seven.
The Wolverines lost the ball twice
to four times for Stanford. Mich-
igan, however, was outlucked in
the deal.
The Stanford touchdown that
tie dthe score in, the second
period was aided by the break
that saw the ball roll out of
bounds after Mathias had, let go
of it after a hard tackle. As he
was the last to touch it, the .ball
belonged to the Indians on the
Michigan 19. If the Wolverines
had regained possession, it prob-
ably would have averted the
touchdown pass which came on
the next play.
Ralph Stribe, Michigan tackle,
was hospitalized after the game
with a dislocated hip and a pos-
sible chipped bone.
Palo Alto hospital authorities
said he would be confined there at
least overnight.
Stribe, 22, a senior and first
string tackle played a great game
for Michigan's offensive team un-
til he was carried from the field
on a stretcher late in the fourth
period.
* * *
LINEUPS
MICHIGAN
LE-Perry,. Bates, Green, Vaselenak
LT-Stowzewski, Bennett, Walker
LG-Timm, Dugger
C-'Shaughnessy
RG-Cachey, Bieson, Mattheson,
Balog
RT-Stribe, Zatkoff
RF-StanfordaTopp, Knutson
QB-Topor, MacDonald, Billings
LH-Kress, Oldham
RH-Branoff, Knickerbocker
FB-Baer, Hurley, Rescrla, Tink-
ham LeClaire
. STANFORD
LE-Morley, Eadie, Bush
LT-Vick, Tanner
LG-Wilson, Wedge
C--Goldberg
RG-Mayhofer, Doster, Krickeberg,
Armitage
RT-Pyle, Stanton, Kirkland
RE-Steinberg, Storum, Hoegh
QB-Garrett
L-Cook, Stewart, Brazel, Mon-
tieth
RH-Roger, Thompson, St. Geme
FB-Mathias, Essegian

PORTLAND - (P) - Unranked
Oregon State slowed the vaunted
Michigan State Spartans to a walk
here yesterday and the Spartans
had to kick a last-second field
goal to pull out a 17-14 football
victory.
Only by the thin margin of an
offside penalty did the Spartans,
the nation's No. 1 team in the
latest Associated Press poll, pull
out the win. Tied 14-14, the Spar-
tans battered down to the Oregon
State 8 but only enough time re-
mained for one more play there.
IN CAME end Eugene Lekenta.
His kick sailed wide of the bars
and it looked as if Oregon State
would take over the ball. But an
offside penalty was called against
Oregon State and Lekenta got an-
other try. He did not miss that
one.
Oregon State, playing with
few reserves, almost completely
checked the Spartans' running
game until the fourth quarter.
Even then, with the Oregon
Staters tiring badly and about
half of them limping, the Spar-
tans could not punch over a
touchdown.1
Midway in the . period they
marched 72 yards only to be halt-
ed on the 8 by last-gasp Oregon
State defense. There a field goal
attempted by fullback Evan Slo-
nac, who had kicked two conver-
sions, sailed wide of the posts.
* * *
THEN, WITH time running out,
Michigan State got the ball once
more on its own 33. There were
three minutes remaining. The
aroused Oregon Staters dlammed
the' Spartans' ground plays back
hard but quarterback Tom Yewcic
turned to the air. Three passes
carried Michigan State again' to

the 8,'and Lekenta's toe did the
rest.
It was Yewcic's passes earlier
that gave Michigan State both
of its touchdowns. His tosses
were wobbly, but the agility of
his receivers made up for that.
He threw a long one in the first
period that sailed between the
arms of a defender; and halfback
Bill Wells nabbed it for a 50-yard
gain to the Oregon State 11. A
few seconds later Yewcic passed 8
yards to end Paul Dekker in the
end zone.
MICHIGAN STATE made it
14-0 in the secondquarter as Yew-
cic passed the team downfield to
another touchdown. The payoff
toss was a high, flopping throw
that came near the 2-yard line.
Just before it hit the ground, end
Ellis Duckett raced in from the
side, grabbed the ball at ankle
height and twisted over the goal.
Oregon State, after fumbling
away three scoring chances earl-
ier in the game, finally scored
just before the end of the third
quarter. A 39-yard pass from
quarterback Jim Withrow' to
halfback Wally Jackson set it
up. Jackson was downed on the
Spartans' 1. From there half-
back Ken Brown bucked over.
Then Michigan State's hard-
running halfback, Don McAuliffe,
fumbled on his own 44, and Ore-
gon State sensed its chance to tie
the highly ranked Spartans. It
took just six plays for Oregon
State to get the tying touchdown
with Withrow passing 20 yards to
end Claret Taylor for the score.
End Jim Cordial kicked the second
of his two conversions for Oregon
State with 13/2 minutes remaining
in the game.

Late Spartan Field Goal
Protects Unbeaten String

(Continued from Page 2)
With Reynolds and Black knot-
ted in another terrific struggle
Mize came up to bat as lead-off
man in the fourth. With the count
one ball and two strikes, he strok-
ed one some 10 or 15 rows back in
the lower right stands.
Mize, the leading active Major
Leaguer in home runs with 355 in
regular season play, bounced a
double into the right field seats for
* * *

bed the ball and tried an under-
handed peg to Phil Rizzuto. The
throw sailed over little Phil's
head into short left for an er-
ror that put men on first and
third with ofily one out.
Then Reynolds really poured it
on. Mixing his streaking fast ball
with a swerving curve, the chief
caught Robinson watching a third
strike. Campanella went down
with a mighty swing to snuff out
this early threat.
S * * *
IN THE FIFTH, Pafko's single~
to left and a walk to Gil Hodges
on four straight balls looked like
real trouble. When Carl Furillo
sacrificed, there were Aien on sec-
ond and third and only one out.
The big pitch of the ball game
came to Black who was under
orders to lay down a squeeze
bunt on the third pitch. Black
missed a low inside pitch as
Pafko raced toward the plate.
Berra easily ran him down and
tagged him out.
Although Reynolds walked Black
to put two men on base again, he
made Billy Cox loft a high foul to
Berra who grabbed it for.the final
out of the inning.
* * *
FOUR CONSECUTIVE balls to
Campanella leading off the sev-
enth again raised the storm sig-
nal in the Yankee bull pen. Rey-
nolds calmly whiffed Pafko and
got out of the inning on Hodges'
double play roller to Rizzuto.
When Furillo opened the
eighth with a single off Rizzuto's

glove and Chuck Dressen start-
ed parading his pinch hitters to
the plate, Reyolds was superb.
George Shuba, swinging for
Black, lifted a 3-2 pitch to Mickey
Mantle. Pinch hitter Rocky Nel-
son, batting for Cox, got only a
loud foul on three strike pitches.
THE BROOKS, who finally were
made favorites after Friday's win
behind Preacher Roe, named Carl
Erskine (14-6) to face Blackwell
tomorrow. The handsome right-
hander was beaten by Vic Raschi
in Thursday's game, 7-1.
* * *
BROOKLYN (N)
A R H 0 A

I

Cox 3b
B-Nelson
Morgan 3b
Reese ss
Snider cf
Robinson 2b
Camipanella
Pafko If
Hodges lb
Furillo rf
Black p
A-Shuba
Rutherford
Totals
McDougald
Rizzuto ss
Mantle cf
Mize lb
C-Collins
Berra c
Woodling if
Bauer rf
Martin 2b
Reynolds p
Totals
A-Flied o

3 0
1 0
0 0
4 0
4 0
b 4 0
Lc 3 0
3 0
2 0
2 0
1 0
1 0
p 0 0
28 0
NEW YORK (A)
A R
3b 3 0
2 0
3 1
3 1
lb 0 0
4 0
t' 3 0
3 0
3 0
3 0
28 2
ut for Black inI

2
0
0
0
3
0
4
2
10
1
0
0
0
24
0
0
1
4
4
1
12
1
2
1
27

0
1
3
1
2
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
10
A
1
3
0
2
0
1
0
0
1
0
8

_FOOTBALLSCORES

HEAR! SEE!
ADLAI STEVENSON
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7
2:30 P.M.
GROUNDS OF PEACE AUD., YPSILANTI
THOSE WHO NEED OR CAN SUPPLY
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MICHIGAN
Stanford 14, Michigan 7
Michigan State 17 Oregon State 14
Western Michigan 18 Central Michi-
gan 0
Washington University 13 Wayne 12
Hillsdale 13 Olivet 0
Michigan Tech 21 Albion 7
MIDWEST
California 49 Minnesota 13
Kansas 21 Colorado 12
Missouri 26 Kansas State 0
Purdue 21 Ohio State 14
Indiana 20 Iowa 13
Wisconsin 20 Illinois 6
Northwestern 20 Vanderbilt 20
Nebraska 16 Iowa State 0
j Denison 28 Mt. Union 14
Bowling Green 45 Ohio Wesleyan 0
Miami (Ohio) 26 Xavier 7
Oklahoma 49 Pittsburgh 20
Ohio University 22bToledo 20
Oberlin 34 Otterbein 6
Wooster 35 Kenyon 19
Hiram 26 Capital 20
Manchester 21 Rose Poly 0
Earlham 33 Indiana Central 21
Valparaiso 32 St. Joseph's 13
Wabash 27 Butler 25
Depauw 40 Ball State 25
Hanover 27 Franklin 7
Wheaton 47 Augustana 6
Drake 34 Emporia (Kas) Teachers 18
Knox 33 Grinnei 25
Wittenberg 47 Marietta 12
Findlay 31 Ashland 20
Dayton 20 North rexas State 14
EAST
Pennsylvania 7 Dartmouth 0
Columbia 16 Harvard 7
Penn State 35 William & Mary 23
Navy 31 Cornell 7
Yale 28 Brown 0
Princeton 61 Rutgers 19
Maine 14 Vermont 6
N.Y.U. 20 Kings Point 20
Holy Cross 12 Fordham 7

Brandeis 28 Northeastern 13
Coast Guard 20 Colby 18
Bates 19 Middlebury 14
Rochester 12 Williams 7
Albright 28 Lafayette 6
Trinity 34 Hobart 0
Connecticut 26 Massachusetts 13
Tufts 15 Worcester Tech 13
Rhode Island 27 New Hampshire 7
Hamilton 52 Brooklyn College 0
Delaware 7 Lehigh 6
Wesleyan 27 Bowdoin 7
Case Tech 13 Washington & Jeffer-
son 0
Franklin & Marshall 19 Johns Hop.
kins 13
SOUTH
Maryland 28 Clemson 0
Georgia 49 North Carolina State 0
Duke 7 Tennessee 0*
W~est Virginia 49 Waynesburg 12
Marshall (W.Va.) 16 John Carroll 7
South Carolina 27 Furman 7
Mississippi 20 Auburn 7
Mississippi State 41 Arkansas State
14

JOHNNY MIZE
. .. haunts Dodgers
* * I
his 1,999th hit. That includes his
series, all-star game and regular
season base hits since he first hit
the majors in 1936.
WHEN THE big fellow from
Demorest, Ga., finally retired for
a pinch runner in the eighth, a
mighty cheer rattled windows in
passing elevated trains.
It mattered little that the
Yanks blasted home an "extra"
run in the eighth on Mickey
Mantle's 450-foot triple off re-
lief man Johnny Rutherford and
Reese's wild peg on a relay
throw.
Mize did it and Reynolds locked
the door. That was the story of this
fourth game. With the series even
at 2-2, the clubs now will return
to Ebbets Field Monday for a
sixth game following today's Yan-
kee Stadium finale. If they need
a seventh, it also will be played
in Brooklyn. Today's game will
start at 2:05 p.m. EST.
AFTER REYNOLDS' fine vic-
tory with only two days of rest,
Stengel named Ewell Blackwell,
the ex-Cincinnati whip, to do the
ho'nors Sunday. Blackwell was 1-0
with the Yanks, working only 16
innings after he was waived out
of the National League Aug. 28.
Black, also trying to come
back with only two days rest
after his brilliant opening win,
was not as sharp as he was
Wednesday. 'Still he allowed
only three hits-a homer and
two doubles-in his seven inn-
ing stay. He walked five and had
men on base in every inning
except the seventh.
A sensational one-handed stab
of Yogi Berra's long drive by Duke
Snider near the auxiliary score-
board in right field saved Black
from further trouble in the fourth.
Berra, still smarting from yester-
day's two-run passed ball "boner,"
was the next batter after Mize hit
his homer. He actually hit the
'ball farther than Big Jawn but
the 400-foot poke was caught by
the agile Snider.
REESE, ON A hitting rampage
in this series, plunked a single to
left center with one out in the
first inning, after Reynolds had
fanned Cox.
On Snider's sharp double play
rap toward second, Billy Mar-
tin appeared to catch his spikes
in the dirt. He stumbled, grab-
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0
0
1
2
0
0
1
0
0
4
8th

B-Struck out for Cox in 8th
C-Ran for Mize in 8th
Brooklyn (N) 000 000
New York (A) 000 100

{aV aVa faacsv a as

1
k r
ALM

000-- 0
61x--2

STATISTICS
Michigan

,1

Virginia 42..P.I. 0
Tulane 35 Santa Clara 0
Ft. Jackson (S.C.) 13 Camp
Jeune (N.C.) 6
SOUTHWEST,
Houston 10 Oklahoma A. & M. 7
Notre Dame 14 Texas 3
Baylor 31 Washington State 7
FAR WEST
Wyoming 14 Utah State 0
Brigham Young 28 Montana 7
Colorado A. & M. 28 Denver 6
Southern California 22 Army 0

Le-

First Downs
Rushing Yardage
Passing Yardage
Passes Attempted
Passes Completed
Passes Intercepted
Punts
Punting Average
Fumbles Lost
Yards Penalized
SCORE BY
MICHIGAN:
STANFORD:

17
122
162
30
18
1
5

Stanford
16
203
81
17
6
4
4

I

U I

43.2 32.3
2 4
86 80
PERIODS
0 7 0 0-
0 7 0 7-14

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