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September 17, 1952 - Image 19

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-09-17

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', SEPTEMBER 17,1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE NINE

tudent

Life.- Classroom

by

Day,

Entertainment

at

Night

* * *

* * *

What to do in Ann Arbor?
As a University town of 47,000
>opulation, the city offers much
In good entertainment..
SIX MOVIE theatres provide
teady diversion to book-weary
tudents.
In addition to the two cam-
pus theatres, which run current
hits, there is the Stud.ent Legis-
lature Cinema Guild, which spe-
cializes in foreign movies and
revivals of artistic value. The
Cinema Guild operates only on
weekends.
Downtown, two theatres provide
, steady diet of re-run B films
with a revival every now and then
or a class A picture several months
ate. The advantage here is lower
prices.
Also downtown is a small thea-
re which brings excellent foreign
ilms and revivals. A run of Alec
Guiness films was shown this
pring and Italian and English
productions are frequently fea-
ured.
* * *
DRAMA flourishes throughout
he ,year. There are the speech
lepartment's student play pro-
ductions in the winter. There is
he Ann Arbor Drama Season in
May and June, bringing Broad-

way stars to act in smash-hit
plays.
The Arts Theatre Club, a lo-
cal professional acting company,
stages "theatre in the round"
productions at their third-floor
play loft downtown. Specializing
in a wide variety of rarely pro-
duced plays, they have attracted
a wide following among stu-
dents and townspeople.
And there are various student
productions - the Junior Girls'
Play, the all-male Union Opera,
the Student Players productions,
Gilbert and. Sullivan operas and
dramas sponsored by, the Inter-
Arts Union.
Together, they manage to en-
sure a play practically every week.
MUSIC IN Ann Arbor is accord-
ed a top spot in most people's en-
tertainment calendar.
Besides the series of concerts
presented by the University Mu-
sical Society - including the
Choral Union Series, the Extra
Concert Series, the Messiah con-
certs, the Chamber Music Fes-
tival and the May Festival --
there are frequent recitals by
members of the music school
faculty, which includes a not-

able ensemble, the Stanley
Quartet.
Students make a lot of music,
too. There are numerous choral
groups, operating for both course
credit and for fun. Students in the
music school give recitals in order
to meet their degree requirements.
And in March, the Inter-Arts
Union puts on the Student Arts
Festival, a three-day gala event
which takes in all students artis-
tic work, including music.
* * *
. LECTURES come with such fre-
quency that attending them all
would be practically a full-time
occupation.-
In addition to departmental
lectures-which are free-there
is the Oratorical Association's
lecture series, bringing well-
known speakers fromall over
the country and abroad.
Social life is vigorous except
during final exam periods. Tradi-
tional highlight of the year is the
J-Hop formal dance, a two-day
shindig between semesters.
To the footloose observer, the
University offers its museums and
galleries for cultural purposes.
* * .*
IF YOU aren't 21, tavern life is
pr'etty well out, unless you have a

new identification trick up your
sleeve, because most of the tav-
erns keep a sharp eye out for
abusers of the State Liquor Laws.
And the University Liquor
Laws prohibit drinking on cam-
pus or in University hous-
ing, so you'll just have to stew
in your coke till that famed
birthday.
For those loaded with identifi-
cation, there are several student
bars downtown where you can get
beer, wine and good meals, but
Washtenaw County is "dry" (no
liquor by the glass) so you have
to adjust your taste to beer. But
there's plenty of beer-good, bad
and dark.
If you tire of all these offerings,
there's always the Arboretum, if
you have a girl. The Arboretum,
University-owned, is some several
hundred acres of wooded hills,
absolutely unlit.

Study Explains
DrinkHabits
The old notion that college
students get their indoctrination
into drinking at college was ex-
ploded during the summer by a
Yale University Research pro-
gram.
The study revealed that four out
of every five college men who
drink acquire the habit before
they enter college. With women,
the ratio is approximately two out
of three.
Other survey . findings showed
that the probability that a per-
son will drink at all is closely re-
lated to whether his or her par-
ents drink.

Flash Card Section To
Include Fall Freshmen

I

Freshmen will be able to work
on the new Block "M" Commit-
tee of the Wolverine Club which
is arranging a giant student flash
card section for the fall football
games.
Last spring 1600 participating
students received seat reservations
around the 50-yard line-where the
flash card section will be located.
Seventy-five freshmen will have
an opportunity to work on the
committee which will plan designs,
prepare publicity and do other
work to carry out the operation.
IN RETURN for their participa-
tion on the committee, the fresh-
men will be given choice seats near
the special section close to the
50-yard line.
Interested freshmen may
write to Block "M" Chairman
Dorothy Fink at 641 W. Buck-
ingham Place, Chicago, Ill. They
'should send a postcard with
their name, Ann Arbor address
I
Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS

if known and their Orientation
Group number.
These people will be given first
consideration. Freshmen will also
be contacted during Orientation
Week through their groups.
Block "M" members will be co-
ordinated into a working unit next
fall. Meetings will be held, movies
shown and large membership but-
tons distributed.
Stunts will be presented at
the Michigan State game on
September 27, the Illinois con-
test on November 1 and the Cor-
nell game on November 8. The
stunts will be coordinated with
the program of the famed Mich-
igan Marching Band.
The Wolverine Club also plans
special football trips to games
played away from Ann Arbor. Ar-
rangements are being made for
a trip to Northwestern for the
October 17-18 football weekend,

-aily-Jack Bergstrom
BUSY NOTE TAKERS COMPRISE MAIN PART OF UNIVERSITY'S EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM
'U' Has 100-Member Symphony Orchestra

tj

In addition to its bands, choirs
and other music groups, the Uni-
versity can boast a 100-member
symphony orchestra.
It is a full symphony organiza-
tion, capable of playing most
works in a standard orchestra re-
pertoire. Prof. Wayne Dunlap is

R

director of the group, which is
included in the School of Music
as a credit course.
Organized in 1896 to provide
music for the May Festival, the
Symphony Orchestra now pre-
sents seven or eight regular con-

certs annually, besides the May
Festival and "Messiah" perform-
ances. Also featured is a children's
concert.
In addition, the orchestra tours
the State for several days each
year.

~~

., 1

"m

at
BARGAIN PRICES

-Daily-Jack Bergstrom
1952 J-HOP CROWD TAKES TIME FROM DANCING TO WATCH A FEATURE NUMBER BY
JOHNNY LONG'S ORCHESTRA

Tbe Quarry WVekomes You
to the Universityof ici gan
n n
01 r
COMPLETE PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY
CAMERA DEPARTMENT EXCLUSiVE LINES OF COSMETICS
* EASTMAN . ELIZABETH AARDEN
* LEICA *-HELENA RUBENSTEIN i
e ZEISS-IKON SCHIAPARELLI
* BOLSEY

QUALI.TY-
First, Last and Always
This old Principle is well nigh a slogan with us -
and for 25 years we have steadfastly adhered to
the idea of "There is no substitute for quality."

Consequently

our ever increasing

clientele

of

Michigan men and women buy our merchandise
with confidence, knowing that they are securing
the best obtainable.
Featuring -
FOR MEN
JOHNSON & MURPHY SHOES
FRENCH-SHRINER & URNER SHOES
BASS FOOTWEAR
EVANS SLIPPERS
FOR WOMEN
SANDLER SPORTSTERS
CALIFORNIA COBBLERS
BASS WEEJUNS

In closing, our entire staff extends
welcome to the incoming Class of

a most hearty
1956.

IE I I

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