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September 17, 1952 - Image 18

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-09-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17,

______________________________________________________________________________________________ I U

"

New Writers
Encouraged
In Hopwoods
Contests Open
To All Students
The University's famed Avery
Hopwood Contest is the first ma-
jor step into the literary field for
aspiring campus writers.
And,, with substantial monetary
awards, it repays early literary
talent with another mark of suc-
cess-the first paycheck, some-
times as high as $1,500.
SINCE 1432, the Hopwood con-
test has had a special competi-
tion for freshmen, although the
original awards were for upper-
classmen only.
Freshmen awards are made
near the end of the fall semes-
ter, when prizes of $50, $30, and
$20 will be given winners of
the 1952-53 competition in es-
say, fiction and poetry.
Upperclassmen will be able to
submit their manuscripts during
the spring semester in competi-
tion for the major and minor di-
vision awards.
Freshman entries are judged
by members of the English de-
partment, while the upperelass
divisions are judged by promi-
nent American literary figures.
There is no restriction on sub-
ject matter in any of the contests.
ORIGINATED by the will of
the late Avery Hopwood, '05, mil-
lionaire playwright, the directors
of the contest were instructed that
"students competing for the prizes
shall not be confined to academic
subjects, but shall be allowed the
widest possible latitude." and that
the new and the unusual should be
especially encouraged.
Hopwood willed more than
$550,000 for prizes in the annual
Hopwood writing contests which
began for upperclassmen in
1931.
Many well-known modern writ-
ers got their start by way of Hop-
wood awards. These authors in-
clude Betty Smith, author of "A
Tree Grows intBrooklyn."
Another of the winners who
has since climbed the ladder to
success is Arthur Miller, '38 who
has won the New York Critics
Drama"Award twice. Miller also
received the Pulitzer prize in
1949 for "Death of a Salesman."
Manuscripts of previous winners
are on file in Rm. 3227 Angell Hall.
the Hopwood Room.
Last spring, 16 University grad*.
uate and undergraduate students
split $9,250 in prizes for fiction,
drama, poetry and the essay.

Varied Campus Clubs Suit
Students' Many Interests

(CODinued from Page 1)
Other fields of study that have
active groups on campus are ar-
chitecture, public administra-
tion, business administration, in-
dustrial relations, anthropology,
journalism, marketing, chemis-
try, botany, sociology and psy-
chology.
Thenthere are the American
Ordnance Association. Student
Science Society, Foresters' Club,
Student Bar Association, Michigan
Actuarial Club, Michigan Crib for
pre-law students, Pre-Medical So-
ciety, Pre-Dental Society, Ameri-
can Pharmacy Association, Gal-
ens Honorary Medical Society, and
an honorary Barristers Society for
law students.
* * *
WITH STUDENTS from all cor-
ners of the earth at the Universi-
ty, many clubs have sprung up in
which foreign stduents get to-
gether to bring into their college
life a bit of their native land.
Among these are clubs repre-
senting the Arab countries, Pak-
istan, China, India, Hawaii,
Turkey, Armenia, Japan, Po-
land and the Philippines. Work-
Remodeled
LibraryReady
A completely remodeled General
Library, with improved lighting
facilities will be ready for student
use this fall.
According to Warner G. Rice,
director of the General Library,
the inside of the building has
been completely repainted, mur-
als are being restored and a smok-
ing lounge being prepared for stu-
Idents.
Rice reported that circulation
figures for the past year indicate
a decline of over 200,000 from the
1950 to '51 figure of 1,444,852 books
circulated for library and home
use.
The total number of books held
by the General Library in divi-
sions all over campus now total
1,512,382 volumes.

ing in conjunction with these
are a Council for Displaced Per-
sons and a Committee for In-
ternational Living.
Students from the Upper Penin-
sula get together in the Hiawatha
Club, and British Commonwealth
Students belong to the Beacon
Club.
ENTHUSIASTS of French, Ger-
man, Spanish and Russian lan-
guage study have formed groups
in which the foreign language is
exclusively spoken to aid students
in improving their skill with
them.
Depending upon whether you
are affiliated or independent
you may join one of these co-
ordinating groups: Assembly,
an association for independent
women; Inter-Cooperative
Council, Inter Fraternity Coun-
cil, or Panhellenic, an associa-
tion of sorority women.
Then come the League and
Union student offices which are
the administrators of student af-
fairs for these recreational cen-
ters.
OTHER STUDENT government
organizations are the all-campus
Student Legislature, the Men's
and Women's Judiciary Councils,
the Engineering Honor Council
and the newly-formed Inter-Dor-
mitory Judiciary Councils.
For the All-Americans, news-
per editors, campus belles and
other assorted big wheels who
manage to get a decent scholas-
tic record there are the honorary
societies, namely: Druids, Michi-
gamua, Scroll, Senior Society,
Sphinx, Triangle, Vulcans, and
Wyvern.
There are also just plain clubs
for people who have a simple in-
terest in common, for instance,
Acolytes, Chess Club, Graduate
Outing Club, Hostel Club, Les
Voyageurs, Midshipman's Club,
Mimes, Quarterdeck, Rifle Club,
Sailing Club, Women's Athletic
Association, ULLR Ski Club, Wol-
verine Club for activity promoters,
and Kindai Nihon Kenkyu Kai,
which is a Japanese study group.

-Daily-Jack Bergstrom
FRATERNITY HAZING--On the way out amon g many fraternities is the annual tradition of haz-
ing pledges. Now, instead of "Hell Week" several houses have "Help Week" in which pledges aid
community welfare projects by donating their time and energy in necessary menial tasks like paint-
ing and cleaning. The new "brothers" pictured above are eating the traditional pledge supper with
their arms tied to a 6x6 timber.
ChangedCapsT Greet Students

4

-Daily-Jack Bergstrom
HONORARY SOCIETIES-Students excelling in campus activi-
ties receive recognition by being "tapped" into one of the several
honor societies. The initiation ritual is the only distasteful part
of being known as a BMOC.
.U' operates Eight Extension
Services Throughout Michigan

Several changes in the campus
scene will greet returning students
this fall.
They will include the completed
Angell Hall addition, remodeled
cement work on the diagonal, two
almost-finished buildings in the
University Hospital area, and
preparations for the new Wo-
men's Athletic Building.
SIX DEPARTMENTS of the lit-
erary college: English, journalism,
psychology, political science, so-
ciology and history will take up
residence in the spacious four
million dollar Angell Hall addition.
The huge brick structure is
made up of a four story class-
room unit, a story and a half
section housing four auditoriums

and the eight story office wing
on the south. Part of the addi-
tion has already been used for
several classes during the sum-
mer session.
The other change on the main
campus is the removal of the brick
'Michigan' emblem from the diag-
onal. This emblem was long the
center of a hazy tradition which
decreed that no freshman could
step on it, for fear of upperclass-
men retaliation.
TWO STRUCTURES in the Uni-
versity Hospital building program
are also nearing completion.

cilities in the hospital proper.
The six-story building, joining
the hospital on the northeast
will provide 24-hour- a-day am-
bulance service plus facilities for
the training of medical students.
The other building, which is ex-
pected to be completed sometime
this fall, is the Kresge Memorial
Research Building, located west
of the Hospital.
Houses have been razed at the
bottom of "Observatory Hill" in
preparation for the University's
newest construction, the new Wo-
men's Athletic Building which will
contain a full sized swimming pool.
It will be constructed on the cor-
ner of Forest and North Univer-
sity, south of the present Women's
Athletic Building.

With offices in eight cities
throughout the state, the Univer-
sity Extension Service offers a
wide variety of educational courses
to a large off-campus enrollment.
Detroit, Grand Rapids, Flint,
Saginaw, Escanaba, Traverse City,
End Ann Arbor are the cities in
which the University now offers.
classes.
Both credit andi non-credit
courses, supervised correspond-
ence courses, adult education
institutes and programs in such
fields as community organiza-
tion, leadership training, fire-
manship training, parent edu-
cation, real estate and business
are among Extension service
programs.
For the third consecutive year,
the University will also present a
televised program of courses, sup-
plementing the regular extension
service servies.

The University was the first in
the country to extend educational
facilities beyond the classroom in
this way. The extension enroll-
ment reached 3847 for 1951-52 as
compared with 2366 for 1950-51,
the first experimental year. A
greater increase is expected this
year.

First is the
building which
expand present

new outpatient
will replace and
overcrowded fa-

9 NOVEMBER 8

o NOVEMBER 8

0 NOVEMBER 8

* NOVEMBER 8

Attention Students
SCHOL OPENING SPECIAL

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First
in Footwear
Fashions!
WINTHROP
Strictly up-to-date, always in keeping
with the finest tradition of quality
footwear. For style, com-
fort and value, you

HOES
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NEW 1952 ROYAL PORTABLE

EASY

$20 Trade-In Sale
Your old portable regardless
of age or condition (4 row
keyboard and back spacer)
is worth $20 when you pur-
chase this new ROYAL.

TERMS

12 MONTHS TO PAY

HEADQUARTERS for PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS

can depend on long-
wearing Wintbops.
trout SJ95

"I

ALL TYPEWRITERS ARE "FAIR TRADED"

We offer the same rices as in your holue town. Buy here and
get the advantage of our tuarantee and convenient service.
ROYAL - SMITH-CORONAS - REMINGTONS
FOREIGN KEYBOARDS AVAILABLE
RENT A TYPEWRITER
$4.00 per Month - Three Months $10.50
HAVE OUR SPECIALISTS SERVICE YOUR
TYPEWRITER .., WE GUARANTEE ALL
REPAIR WORK . . . TWO-DAY SERVICE
All Kinds of Gifts and Novelties ... and
MICHIGAN MUGS and GLASSES

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There's a real deal cooking for November 8!
the Cornell-Michigan football game in the
afternoon and a sensational performance in

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the evening!

The Cornell Men's Glee Club is

4

going to sing in a combined concert with the
U. of M. Men's Glee Club at Hill Auditorium.
It will be a terrific week-end, and will be cli-
maxed by a tremendous concert on Saturday
night. To assure a good seat get your ticket
right away.

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[WINTHROP
SHOES

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Come in and browse around!

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