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October 03, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-03

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1952

TIHE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

FROM CALIFORNIA:
Stanford Editor Gives

Scoop on Indian
(Editor's Note: Larry Cahn, Sports we hav
Editor of the Stanford Daily, wrote
us earlier this fall and asked for a name o
story giving the Michigan end of pears e
the Stanford-Wolverine clash at korian;
Palo Alto. The idea sounded so good Morley
we asked Cahn to do the same for ore
The Daily. A similar story by Daily have m
Sports Editor Ed Whipple ran this Stanfor
week in the Stanford paper. Here's Garret
how.a Stanford writer sees the touchdo
game.)y Youchom
By LARRY CA N out ofrs
Stanford Daily Sports Edito Writers E
STANFORD, California-It ap- junior fr
pears that Chuck Taylor, Stan- nia, as t
ford's 32-year-old grid boss, has Pacifici
again come up with a sound ball
club. It was last year that Taylor STAN]
first took over as head man and which w
with little material ended up in a bit str
the Rose Bowl and was named the Wor
Coach of the Year. Mathias.
And now with only 21 lettermen threat at
returning and key spot weaknesses, Cook an
Taylor has Stanford folks asking, of ability
"Just how good are the Indians?" Accor
Tomorrow should provide the an- coaches
swer, when the Indians play host wall is
to your good Michigan squad. the one
* * * the atti
TO DATE STANFORD has won ary firs
two games, sweeping Santa Clara game a
off her feet with a second half with s
surge to win, 28-13, and holding opener
on to a stagger home a 14-13 win- played
ner over Washington State. Both hand a
of these clubs are tough. We have til this
read with interest of the Wolver- Ticket
ines' 27-13 defeat at the hands of interest
Michigan State last week. But no ford Sta
one is taken in by it as we have 90,000 sI
also heard that Michigan State is the only
just about as good as they come. week-en
And we also respect your Big Ten thirty m
no matter who we play-our last road ba(
Rose Bowl game taught us that. dians a:
Last year Stanford travelled to avenge1
Ann Arbor and edged the home hands o
club, 23-13, with Gary Kerkorian as prove
and Bill McColl carrying the at- first tw
tack. Well, Gary and Bill are victory
gone and are in pro ball, but all this.

Team

Yankees Er
Raschi Gives Up Three Hits
While Teammates Bag Ten

,en

Series

with

7-1

in

e a boy out here by the
of Bob Garrett who ap-
very bit as good as Ker-
and a pair of ends Sam
and John Steinberg who
ade it awfully tough for
d's opponents to date.
t has thrown to four
wns and has completed 18
29 passes in two games.
are already acclaiming the
rom San Marino, Califor-
he best passer ever in the
Coast Conference.
* * *
FORD'S RUNNING game
as weak last year is only
ronger and is powered by
ld's Greatest Athlete, Bob
. Bob is a breakaway
t any time. Halfbacks Ron
nd Skip Cris show spurts
y and brilliance.
rding to Stanford line
the Indians forward
20 per cent improved over
e which crumpled before
ack of Illinois last Janu-
st. Tomorrow is the first
at home for the Indians
school in session. The
against Santa Clara was
here but with few on
s classes didn't start un-
Wednesday.
sales have indicated vast
in the game and Stan-
adium with a capacity of
hould be well filled. This is
y game in the area this
d as California, our rival
iles to the North is on the
ck in your locale. The In-
re fired up and want to
their last beating at the
f a Big Ten squad as well
to Stanford fans that the
o wins were not flukes. A
over Michigan would do

SAME RESULTS?
'MI' Western Grid Treek
Recalls 1902 Yost Trip

(Continued from Page 1)
After looking at a ball, he pickled
Loes' second pitch into the seats
about 360 feet away to break the
game wide open with three more
big runs.
* * *
THE ROOF almost caved in on
Erskine in the fifth. There were
Yanks on first and second with
only one out.
On a third ball to Phil Rizzuto
that hit the plate and bounced
from Campanella's mitt, Bauer
started to run. Apparently he
did not realize that Martin had
not started to move.
Consequently Martin was cut
down easily at third by Campanel-
la's peg to Billy Cox.
* * *
"LOPAT tomorrow," said Sten-
gel.
"Raschi was wonderful today.
He doesn't look like a graceful
pitcher but he has the stuff or
he wouldn't have the record he
has."
Raschi, used to such details as
World Series victories, took things
in stride.
* * *
"TROUBLE?" he said. "I didn't
have trouble. I walked three men
in the second but they didn't score.
It's when they score you have
trouble."
In the Dodger clubhouse,
Manager Chuck Dressen ex-
plained Erskine had fallen off a
ladder in the clubhouse before
the game, aggravating an old
knee injury.
The scene shifts to the big Yan-
kee Stadium for today's third
game with two lefthanders-
Yankee Ed Lopat (10-5) and

Dodger Preacher Roe (11-2)-
slated to work.
The teams will continue play at
the stadium tomorrow and Sun-
day, moving back to Brooklyn
Monday and Tuesday if nobody
has won four by that time.
Rain fell on Yankee Stadium
Thursday night but the weather
man promised clearing weather for
the third game of the World Series

today.

* * *

Box Score

NEW YORK
AB R
Bauer, rf 4 0
Rizzuto, ss 4 0
Mantle, cf 5 2
Woodling, if 4 1
Berra, c 3 0
Collins, lb 3 1
McDougald, 3b 3 2
Martin, 2b 4 1
Raschi, p 3 0
Totals 33 7
BROOKLYN

(A)
H PO
1 3
0 2
3 2
1 2
2 10
0 8
1 0
2 0
0 0
10 27

Al
Cox, 3b 4
Reese, ss 3
Snider, of 4
Robinson, 2b 3
Campanella, C
Pafko, if4
Hodges, lb 3
Furillo, rf3
Erskine, p 2
Loes, p0
Lehman, p 0
Totals 3
NEW YORK (A)
BROOKLYN (N)

B
4
3
4
3
4
4
3
2
0

R
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

(N)
HI
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

Pa
1
3
1
3
7
2
9
2
0
0
0

A
0
2
0
0
2
1
1
1
0
7
A
0
5
0
3
3
0
0
0
1
0
1

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
E
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0

A COUPLE OF SOUTHPAWS-Preacher Roe (left) and Eddie
Lopat (right) will oppose each other on the Yankee Stadium
mound in the third game of the World Series tomorrow. Brook-
lyn and New York have won a game apiece. The Dodgers' Roe
carries a 11-2 season record into the important contest, while
Lopat won 10 and lost two during the campaign for the Yankees.
Michigan To Receive $50,000
For Stanford Game TV Rights

By DICK LEWIS
Fifty years can make a big dif-
ference.
It was just five decades ago
that the first of the fabulous
point-a-minute teams of Fielding
H. Yost entrained for the West
Coast to inaugurate the Michigan-
Stanford series that has its fifth
renewal in Palo Alto tomorrow.
THE OCCASION for the conflict
was an invitation by Pasadena's
Tournament of Roses, and the
bases for the choice were such
Wolverine immortals as Willie
Heston, Neil Snow, Hugh White,
Boss Weeks and Dan McGugin.
These five, plus half a dozen
others, had racked up 510 points
while holding the opposition
scoreless in a string of ten suc-
cessive wins over the 1902 sea-
son.
Even with such a remarkable
record, the Mid-Western invaders
were given little chance of beat-
ing the powerful Indians. Recog-
nizing this, and realizing that the
The Intramural Department
needs officials for touch foot-
ball. Those interested call the
I-M Building at 8109 or con-
tact Dick Dennis at 3-1616.
Michigan aggregation consisted of
a mere 15 football players, Yost
suggested that the halves be shor-
tened so the humiliation would
not be too great. Stanford coach
Ralph Fisher refused.
* * *
GAME TIME arrived, and the
Maize and Blue eleven took the

field before 8,000 fans. When the
final whistle blew, the same eleven
players trotted off the field with a
lop-sided 49-0 slaughter of the
cocky Indians.
With the score 35-0 against
him, Fisher suggested calling
the game because of the gather-
ing darkness and the fact that
Stanford had run out of substi-
tutes. The game was cut short
ten minutes as Yost and his
eleven iron men had the last
laugh.
Stanford put up a valiant fight
before withering in the 85-degree
heat. For 23 minutes it was a
scoreless tie. Then the great Hes-
ton took the ball on a fourth down
naked reverse and carried 21 yards
to the Indian eight.
From there, Snow punched over
with the first of his five touch-
downs, a Rose Bowl standard that
still exists today. Snow's scoring
runs were for six, two, eight, 17
and four yards.
Left end Curtis Redden added
two more five pointers (touch-
downs were worth only five points
in those days), returning two
punts 25 yards each.
Right half Al Herrnstein scored
the other TD, while right tackle
Bruen Shorts kicked four extra
points and Ev Sweeley booted a
twenty-yard field goal in addi-
tion to punting 21 times for a 39
yard average.
All this action took place just
fifty years ago. The immortal
Heston and the merely mortal
Sweeley will be watching this
year's fracas from the relatively
safe environs of the stands in
sunny Palo Alto.

L.

1 1 3 27 13 1

I-M

BRIEFS

-I

000 115
001 000

000-7
000-1

GRID SELECTIONS

By NEIL BERNSTEIN
The University of Michigan will
receive $47,000 more this week for
allowing its football team to ap-
pear on television than it netted
last Saturday for the same rights.
Last week, the University re-
ceived around $3,000 for their
share of the television rights to the
Michigan-MSC clash, and tomor-
row they will get roughly $50,000
for the rights to the Wolverine
clash with Stanford.
* * *
THIS IS ONE of the more in-
teresting aspects of the NCAA's
1952 national-local program for
televising this season's football
games.
Under the present plan, now
in its third week of operation,
one game will be videoed each
Saturday on a coast-to-coast
basis. Unlike the experimental
program used last year, there
will be no "blackout" areas this
year, from which the televised
game will be withheld.
In addition to the game shown
nationally which this week will
be the Wolverine-Indian clash, lo-
cal stations will be encouraged to
substitute at least one game played
in their area for the national game.
This can only be done if the pro-
posed local game is a sellout and
the video does not conflict with
any other grid clash in that area.

THE BEST example of this lo-
cal coverage was the Michigan-
Spartan game, covered last Satur-
day by a Detroit station only,
which explains the difference in
revenue between the school's share
of the two Wolverine televisings.
The nationally-viewed con-
tests, eleven in all, will endeavor
to represent the football in ev-
ery section of the country and
procure the best possible games.
Also, no team will be televised
in this manner more than once
over the season.
Although television profits from
the 1952 schedule will go only to
the colleges whose teams are in-
volved in the series, a plan has
been drawn up by the TV commit-
tee for presentation to the next
NCAA convention, whereby the
profits from the video rights will
be divided among all member col-
leges.
Another interesting aspect of to-
morrow's game is the fact that
the play-by-play announcer for
this contest only will be former
Michigan great Tom Harmon.
There will be eight more tele-
vised contests, in addition to the
Wolverine tilt, including the MSC-
Texas A&M contest next Satur-
day and the Army-Navy game
November 29.

a

Professional fraternity football
play got underway yesterday with
a full series of six tilts.
The Law Club, last year's intra-
mural football champions, began
a successful defense of their title
by downing Alpha Rho Chi, 27-0.
The victors were clearly in com-
mand of the situation all the way,
as they outplayed their foes both
on offense and defense and scored
two touchdowns in each half.
* * * *
DAVE RAY was high scorer for
the Barristers, with two touch-
downs, one on a running play and
the other on a long pass from Bob
Cary.
The other tallies were netted
by Len Kravets and Frank Cory,
Kravets scoring on a long end
run and Cory by intercepting an
Alpha Rho pass and crossing the
goal.
Phi Delta Phi took to the air
to down an undermanned Alpha
Kappa Psi squad, 34-0. The com-
bination of Jim Cook passing to
Don Lunt clicked for the Phi Delts,
netting them a total of three
touchdowns.
JIM DICKERSON threw a long
aerial to Jim Gault for the re-
maining tally in the game.
In a bruising defensive battle,
Phi Rho Sigma edged out Alpha
Omega, 7-0. After an evenly-con-
tested battle for most of the game,
a Phi Rho pass series brought the
priC

ball to the five yard line. Swift-
footed Ken Averill took it over the
goal line from there on a wide end
sweep.
The extra point was added by a
flat pass from Averill to teammate
Russell Howard.
In other professional fraternity
grid action, Phi Alpha Kappa
downed Tau Epsilon Rho, 12-0,
and Phi Delta Epsilon took the
measure of Phi Delta Chi, 18-12.
Delta Sigma Delta won its game
by forfeit over the Air Force.
Spartan Squad
Starts Journey
For Portland
EAST LANSING (M)-Michigan
State's football team left the cam-
pus yesterday and was winging
west to Oregon State for a Satur-
day date with the Beavers at Port-
land.
THE SPARTANS bussed to De-
troit where they boarded a plan
at Willow Run.
A brief workout was staged in
Macklin Stadium in the early
morning before the squad left
the campus.
Before he left, Coach Biggie
Munn said there was a chance
he might start Billy Wells, lead-
ing ground-gainer against Michi-
gan, at wingback in place of Pi-
sano.
'I HAVEN'T MADE up my mind
about it yet," Munn said. "Maybe
we will start Wells but again it
could just as easily be Pisano.
He's a senior and a steady player
and has never given us a bad per-
formance at the position."
Guard Frank Kush has been
taking it easy this week because
of an ankle sprain and a bad
bruise on his hand but is expected
to be able to start.
FOR FUN AND
RELAXATION .,.
Golf Practice
Range
WE FURNISH CLUBS.
OPEN 3:00-11:00 P.M.
31/2 miles east of Ann Arbor-
out Washtenaw and one mile
south on Milan Rd. (U.S.-23)
or out Packard Rd. to Milan Rd.
(U.S.-23).

i

L

GAMES OF THE WEEK
(Consensus Selections (10-3) Appear in Capitals)

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
S.

MICHIGAN at Stanford
MICHIGAN ST. at Oregon St.
CALIFORNIA at Minnesota
Clemson at MARYLAND
Iowa at INDIANA
Colorado at KANSAS
GEORGIA TECH at S. Metho.
Purdue at OHIO STATE

9.Army at SOUTHERN CAL.
10. TENNESSEE at Duke
11. Vanderbilt at NORTH-
WESTERN
12 UCLA at WASHINGTON
13. ILLINOIS at Wisconsin
14. Notre Dame at TEGAS
15. NAVY at Cornell

/

SELECTIONS
BOB MARGOLIN (11-2-.846)-Stanford, MSC, California, Maryland,
Indiana, Colorado, SMU, Purdue, USC, Duke, Northwestern, Wash-
ington, Wisconsin, Texas Navy
NEIL BERNSTEIN (11-2-.846)-Michigan, MSC, California, Mary-
land, Indiana, Colorado, Georgia Tech, OSU, USC, Tennessee,
Vanderbilt, Washington, Illinois, Texas, Navy.
ED WHIPPLE (10-3-.769)-Michigan, MSC, California, Maryland, In-
diana, Kansas, Georgia Tech, OSU, USC, Duke, Northwestern,
UCLA, Illinois, Notre Dame, Navy
JOHN JENKS (10-3-.769)-Michigan, MSC, California, Maryland,
Indiana, Kansas, Georgia Tech, OSU, USC, Tennessee, North-
western, Washington, Illinois, Texas, Navy
DICK LEWIS (10-3-769)-Michigan, MSC, California, Maryland,
Indiana, Kansas,'Georgia Tech, OSU, USC, Tennessee, North-
western, UCLA, Illinois, Texas, Navy
IVAN KAYE (10-3-.769) - Michigan, MSC, California, Maryland, In-
diana, Kansas, Georgia Tech, OSU, USC, Tennessee, Northwestern,
UCLA, Illinois, Texas, Navy. ,
PAUL GREENBERG (10-3-.769)-Michigan, MSC, California, Mary-
land, Indiana, Kansas, Georgia Tech, Purdue, USC, Duke, North-
western, Washington, Illinois, Notre Dame, Navy
ED SMITH (9-4-.692)I-Michigan, MSC, California, Maryland, Indi-
ana, Kansas, Georgia Tech, OSU, USC, Tennessee, Northwestern,
Washington, Illinois, Texas, Navy
DICK SEWELL (8-5-.615)-Michigan, MSC, California, Maryland,
Indiana, Kansas, Georgia Tech, OSU, USC, Tennessee, North-
western, Washington, Illinois, Texas, Navy

,4)

Are You Eligible?
DANCING
Friday and Saturday Nites
Dancing Saturday Afternoon
after the game.
Members
and Guests
314 E. Liberty St.
V1? g) Ph. 2-3972
C UYou Must Be 21
RENTALS & BANQUETS

c.,e

If

DON BAILEY
Your Singing Host
-HALL!

IT WENT OUT WITH RACCOON COATS and on quality, comfort and casualness.
rumble seats. And we say good Like this button-down Oxford
riddance. with just the proper roll to the
Today's college man doesn't die collar. Or this fine white piqui with
a thousand deaths when the school an eyelet tab collar with just the
loses the big game. And his clothes right degree of difference.
are no longer flashy, fancy and We understand the modern col-
gaudy. lege man. We concentrate our
For his apparel, he looks to efforts, not on fads, but on making
Manhattan" to reflect his quiet, self- a better shirt. Ask for Manhattan
assured manner ... his insistence ... and you'll see how true this is.
Shirts, neckwear, underwear,
pajamas, sportshirts,
beachwear and handkerchiefs

Wild's

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-Ml

FR OM

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CREAM
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ONE-STOP
LAUNDERING
and
Cleaning Service
Laundry Takes Less Than An Hour
wet wash or fluff dried and folded
Finished Shirts
48-HOUR SERVICE

New "low 3" model is so named
for the effective, lower, closer placement
0f the 3 buttons with the closing button
at the waistline. Narrower lapels and
Sflap pockets also accent straight,
natural lines. In many
neat and narrow and
'Y> KNOX HAT $10

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SWIFTS
DRUG STORE
340 S. State St.

I

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ARROW SHIRT
$3.95
REPP TIE $2.50

THE ABOVE SHIRT STYLES
ARE AVAILABLE AT

I

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