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February 18, 1953 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-02-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FEBRUARY 18,,1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

'uture Ice Hopes Hinge
)n Freshman Pucksters

Vic Heyliger, Wolverine hock-
ey mentor, besides concentrating
heavily upon the remaining games
of this year's MCHL schedule, has
not lost sight of his future plans
for the Michigan sextet.
Working out daily with the var-
sity are several freshmen pros-
pects for next season's squad. At
least four new faces will appear in
Relays for Social Fraterni-
ties, Residence Halls and Inde-
pendent teams will be run off
Thursday from 7:30 to 8:30 at
Yost Field House.
Finals for the top five teams
in both the Residence Hall and
Fraternity divisions will be run
off at the ,Field House Satur-
day, February 28 before the
Michigan-Ohio State meet.
-Earl Riskey
Maize and Blue uniforms next
season to replace Wolverines who
will be lost to the team through
graduation.
BESIDES John McKennell and
Earl Keyes, whose losses have
already been felt, the Wol-
verine pucksters will be without
the services of this year's captain,
Johnny Matchefts, and star de-
fenseman, Alex McClellan.
Among the new men who will
U U~

be eligible for league competition
come next fall will be Jay Gould,
a fast improving forward from
Highland Lake, Ontario. Gould
is 5'11" and tips the scales at
around 185 pounds.
Contrasted to Gould's big frame
is that of Yves Hebert, a forward
from Montreal, Quebec. Hebert is
only 5'7" and weighs a scant 145
pounds. Size is certainly no indi-
cation of hockey ability for John-
ny Matchefts, undoubtedly one of
the finest hockey players to wear
a Wolverine uniform, is not much
bigger himself.
ANOTHER HEYLIGER find is
Bill McFarland, a 6', 190 pound
center from Toronto, Ontario.
Also from Ontario is defenseman
Don MacArthur. Though only 17
years old, he is 5' 11" and weighs
180 pounds.
The one player who will have
the most difficulty breaking into
the Michigan lineup will be
goaltender Lorne Howes. Howes,
who hails from the same town
as Gould, Highland Lake, is
faced with the task of bucking
such competition as Willard
Ikola and Bill Lucier,
Ikola has one more season re-
maining to play while Lucier is
only a sophomore and has played
on the varsity squad for two years
now. The presence of Howes poses
a very enjoyable problem for Hey-
liger as he rates all three as out-
standing goaltenders.
Howes has made one appearance
before Michigan fans. He guarded
the nets during the third period of
the Wolverine - Detroit Red Wings
exhibition game earlier this month.

'M' Tankers
Tops Along
WithBucks
By IVAN KAYE
The Western Conference swim-
ming race has boiled down ,to a
two team affair.
Michigan and Ohio State pos-
sess great natatorial machines, and
should far outdistance all oppo-
sition for conference honors.
THE pBUCKEYES would have a
perfect dual meet record were it
not for a 51-39 loss to Michigan
State, incurred when Ford Konno
and Dick Cleveland were ineligi-
ble. Both great stars are now in
All aspirants for varsity
baseball please report to me at
the south end of the Field-
house any afternoon this week
between 1:30 and 5 p.m.
-Ray Fisher
the good graces of the authorities
and can be counted upon to bul-
wark Ohio's defense of its cham-
pionship.
Michigan demolished the
Spartan swimmers with appar-
ent ease on Saturday. The return
of Ron Gora, who captured both
the 100 and 220 yard freestyle
events in addition to sprinting
a leg for the 400 yard freestyle
relay quartet, has greatly
strengthened the Maize and Blue
of Coach Matt Mann.
Burwell "Bumpy" Jones posted
a double victory when he came
home first in both the 440 yard
freestyle and the 150 yard indi-
vidual medley.
DIVER Jimmy Walters, much
improved over last year and still
only a sophomore, almost suc-
ceeded in beating State's Ken
Coyne. The Spartan finished with
310.4, while Walters had a score
of 307.35.
Despite Walters' improvement,
the diving power of the Big Ten
still rests with Ohio State. Mike
Peppe, the Buckey mentor, was
the Olympic diving coach last
summer and is a master in the
art of developing top-notch board-
men.

A TO's Top Phi
Psi Five,35-21
Pilams Triumph Over Betas, 51-30;
Sig Eps Cop Overtime IM Hoop Tilt

By KEN COPP
The last games in the first round
of "A" fraternity basketball proved
to be the best last night with each
game producing a bitter contest
as opposed to the high schoring
games during the earlier part of
the round.
Alpha Tau Omega, last year's
champion, continued on its way
by downing Phi Kappa Psi, 35-21.
Bob Dingman led the victors with
12 points and Bud Jones topped
him with 14 points for the losers.
PI LAMBDA PHI, which had
rolled up high scores in previous
contests, was held back by Beta
Theta Pi in the first half but
went on to win, 51-30. Tom Fabian
led the scoring with 13 points.
Sigma Phi Epsilon and Sigma
Alpha Epsilon fought hard
throughout their game with the
result being a tie. The game
went into overtime and the Sig
Eps were the first to score two
points therefore winning, 30-28.
Phi Kappa Sigma ran over The-
ta Delta Chi with the season's
highest scoring spree, 93-20. Every
member of Phi Kappa Sigma's
starting five had double scores
with Carl Lowrey getting 28 points.
* * *
THE SEASON'S lowest scoring
game resulted in Triangle topping
Phi Kappa Tau, 14-13. Both
teams showed good defense and
evidently tried to keep just ahead
of the other team.
Phi Gamma Delta and Psi Upsi-
lon were fairly evenly matched
and therefore played a good game
with the former coming out the
victor, 39-29. Alex Mann led the
scoring with 13 scores for the win-
ning team.
Other I-M scores
BASKETBALL
Sigma Alpha Mu 41, Alpha Sigma
Phi 204A
Acacia 54, Alpha Phi Alpha 32

TO NO AVAIL:
Lawrence, Eaddy Pace Quintet on Road

FINAL
Clearance
STORM
COATS
'/sOFF
WINTER
JACKETS
OFF
WOOL SHIRTS
FLANNEL SHIRTS
OFF
Walk A Few Steps
and Save Dollars
KUOHN'S
217 E. Liberty Ph. 8020

Delta Chi 38, Theta Xi 34
Lambda Chi Alpha 40, Alpha Epsi-
Ion Pi 33
Theta Chi 28, Zeta Beta Tau 26
Delta Sigma Phi 27, Tau Delta Phi 18
Delta Tau Delta 26, Phi Delta Theta 24
Tau Kappa Epsilon defeated Zeta Psi
(forfeit)
Chi Psi defeated Chi Phi (forfeit)
sigma Nu defeated Delta Kappa Fpsi-
lon (forfeit)
Kappa Sigma defeated Phi Sigma Del-
ta (forefit)
Sigma Chi defeated Delta Upsilon
(forfeit)
Alpha Delta Phi defeated Phi sigma
Kappa (forfeit)
VOLLEYBALL
WRRC Digits 4, Social Research 2
WRRC Rockets 4, Aero Engineers 2
Psychology A defeated Psychology B
(forfeit)
WATER POLO
Strauss 1, Michigan 0
Chicago 1, Gomberg 0
Ski, Sailboat
Enthusiasts
Meet Today
Michigan's outdoor clubs, ski-
ing and sailing, will both open
their doors to new members in
separate meetings at 7:30 p.m. to-
day on the Union third floor.
The Ullr Ski Club, with mem-
ories of several days of between
semesters skiing on Michigan ski
trails, is planning an even better
trip during spring vacation.
ANYONE interested in skiing,
regardless of experience or own-
ership of equipment, is invited to
attend tonight's meeting accord-
ing to Mary Hoyt, club member.
Movies will be shown.
Bob Allen, commodore of the
sailing club, promises plenty of
sailing this spring. All but one
of the club's dual meets will be
at other schools, leaving the
full fleet of 10 DT's and one fi-
berglass dinghy available for
weekend use by members,
Allen, who waselectedscommo-
dore of Midwest Sailing Associa-
tion Sunday, reports that its
membership now totals 31 with
the addition of Minnesota, Mar-
quette and Fenn College.
Both clubs have been popular
with the female as well as the
male sex and coeds have once
again been invited to attend the
meetings.

By DICK BUCK
A number of things have become
obvious in the last two Michigan
basketball contests.
Captain Doug Lawrence has re-
emerged into the limelight along
with Don Eaddy by carrying the
heaviest part of the scoring bur-
den against Wisconsin and Min-
nesota.
* * ,*'
AFTER NETTING 15 points in
the Wisconsin game including five
successive set shots, Lawrence
upped the ante in the Minnesota
game, pushing through 20 points
again hitting with deadly accur-
acy on his long shots.
Eaddy dropped in 13 against
Wisconsin before matching Law-
rence's 20 point output with
Minnesota.
This scoring outbreak is pretty
good evidence ,that spectators will
be seeing a lot of the duo during
both having seen considerable
the remainder of the season:
both having seen considerable
service on the bench at one time
or another.
* * *
WE MIGHT say that the Wol-
verines have lost the last two
games on fouls.
Both contests were close until
the last few seconds ,Michigan
trailing Wisconsin, 66-63, until
the Badgers put on the fourth,
period stall. It was even closer
with the Gophers, the score be-
ing knotted 76-76 before the
SCORING STATISTICS-16 GAMES

Wolverines lost ground in the
overtime period.
Michigan committed 56 fouls in
the two losses, and this was rea-
soht enough to make them losses.
THE MAIZE AND BLUE played
the final period of the Wisconsin
tilt without the services of Paul
* * *

bounders in the game, the Wol-
verines could hardly hope to
stop such rien as Paul Morrow
and Ed Kalafat.
At this point we can scarcely
blame inexperience as the chief
factor in the outbreak of the foul-
ing epidemic.
Center Paul Groffsky still leads
Michigan scorers with 226 points
in 16 games. He tacked on 20 for
the two most recent contests, 9
against Wisconsin and 11 with the
Gophers. Groffsky is averaging
14.1 points per game.
'ColoradoIe
'Squad Loses
SevenPlayers
COLORADO SPRINGS()--Sev-
en members of the Colorado Col-
lege ice hockey team have been
suspended for the remainder of
the season for disciplinary rea-
sons, William H. Gill, CCpresi-
dent, announced today.
The players were accused of
breaking training regulations while
on a recent trip to Grand Forks,
.D., and Houghton, Mich., Gill
said. C.C. is a member of the Mid-
west Collegiate Hockey League.
* * *.
THOSE SUSPENDED are Capt
Leo Soligo, Ken Kinsley, Andy
Gambucci, Jim Weir, Jim Thomp-
son, Fred Eastwood and Len Gag-
non.
The team has four games left .
this season - against Brandon
of Canada tomorrow and Thurs-
day nights' and against Alberta
University on Feb. 28 and March
1, all at home.
Coach Cheddy Thompson said he
will fill out the squad by promot-
ing players from the junior var-
sity team.

Player
Groff sky
Eaddy
Mead
Coddwell
Pavichevich
Lawrence
Kauffman
Allen
Tbpp
Schlicht
Williams
Stern
Totals

G FG ,FT

Pts. Ave.

16
16
16
16
16
15
16
14
11
S
1
2

81 64
72 66
60 46
50 62
46 28
49 17
19 35
12 6
4 9
4 1
4 0
2 0

226
194
166
162
120
115
73
30
16
9
8
4

14.1
12.1
10.4
10.1
7.5
7.7
4.6
2.1
1.5
I.1
8.0
2.0

DON EADDY
.,..returns to form
Groffsky, John Codwell, and Milt
Mead and suffered the same fate
this week as Mead and Groffsky
fouled out again and Lawrence
was added to the list.
Without their biggest re-

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MY QUESTION TO THE G-E STUDENT INFORMATION PANEL:

iat educational training opportunities
available. to-engineers .in-General
tric?"
AMES H. ROBBINS, Un iversity of Florida; 1953
swer to Mr. Robbins' question, presented at a student informa-
eting held in July, 1952 between G-E personnel and'repre-
'e college students, is printed below. If you have a question
uld like answered, or seek further information about General
mail your request to College Editor, Dept. 221-6, General
Co., Schenectady, N. Y;
Organized to'develop top-
flight engineers; the Advanced
Engineering Program provides
an opportunity to study fun-
damental physical principles
and advanced mathematical
methods in the areas of elec-
trical and mechanical engineer-
ing.
The Process Technology
Program; concerned with chemical; chemical engineering;
and metallurgical fields; acquaints the engineer with
laboratory and engineering groups, with activities in many
locations; and with various product businesses of the

M. M. BORING, Engineering Services Division : a . In
General Electric the engineer has his choice of engaging
in either Company education programs or in graduate
study in nearby colleges and universities.
The Company programs are based on material directed
toward better fitting the engineer for a career with the
Company. He will gain first-hand knowledge of industry;
come in contact with many different products and types
of work; and associate with toptflight engineers.

General Electric actively encourages, college graduate
study; and when this study applies to the individuals
work; on approval by his departmental manager; provi-
sions are made for refunds of one-half tuition costs upon
satisfactory completion of courses.
The technical education programs in G.E. may be di-
vided into two main categories: the advanced technical
programs; where carefully selected students (any engi-
neer may apply) are given intensive training; and the
general and specialized technical courses; available to all
Company engineers.-
The objective of the advanced technical programs-
Creative Engineering; Advanced Engineering; and Process
Technology-is to impart an understanding of funda-
mental scientific principles and their application to par-
,ticular problems; as well as to encourage a basic approach
to these problems and promote confidence in the engi-
neer's own ability.
The Creative Engineering Program is directed toward
developing creative and inventive abilities, and a logical

Company.
The category that includes the general courses is de:
signed to acquaint engineers with the engineering aspects
of marketing; manufacturing; and application engineer-
ing as well as providing less intensive courses on funda-
mental principles. The specialized technical courses pro-
vide intensive study for engineers permanently assigned
to operating departments in such fields as servo-
mechanics; heat transfer; and magnetic design.
In addition; educational opportunities are offered
engineers by our Manufacturing, Marketing; Employee
and Plant Community Relations; and other divisions.
Besides having the opportunity for educational devel-
opment; the engineer in General Electric is given a good
job with plenty of responsibility; sound training for a
lifetime career. nnn intim.f r.i. ;, m a

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