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May 24, 1953 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-05-24

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9

SUNDAY, MAY 24, 190S .

THE -MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAYMAY 2415

t

DAILY MENTOR BOWS OUT:
It's Thirty for City Editor Connable'

By GAYLE GREENE
(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is
not an assigned story-ABC I1.)
Down to two packages of cigar-
ettes a day, shorn of the baggy
tenchcoat, the green eyeshade and
the 24-hour Job of Daily City Edi-
tor, Alfred Barnes Connable, III,
is enjoying a period of conva-
lescence playing solitaire, dusting
off an impressive pyramid of un-
explored texts and meditating in a
Yogi position.
With his hollowed cheeks filled
out and the snadows under his
eyes fading to a light green, Con-
nable, the man who originated the
writing style of Daily personality
interviews, yesterday submitted
himself to one.
*~N * *
CONNABLE,- who changed his
name from Al to Barnes to avoid
being linked with the administra-
tion (his father is a Regent)
wrapped his feet around the legs
of a swivel chair and tersely an-
swered questions about "the Con."
"I often sit Yogi and I used to
work for Alger Hiss," he began.
"I was a courier for the Carnegie
)Endowment for. International
Peace. I was the architect of our
entire Far Easten policy," he
said.
Records may be lacking to prove
this last assertion but the Daily
files testify that the bedraggled,
unkempt reporter in the wrinkled
tweed jacket by-lined some of the
top local news stories during the
past three years.
He covered the Pauline Camp-
bell murder for the United Press
(and admits with a chuckle that
Associated Press stories were

* * ,~'

4 * *

'U' Students
To Publish
SportsBpook
Resulting from countless man-
hours of work by several members
of The Daily sports staff and Sig-
ma Delta Chi, professional journ-
alism fraternity, the first book
containing an account of the most
famous sports events in University
history will go on sale to Alumni
June 1 and to students next fall.
Entitled "Memorable Moments
in Michigan Sports," the book con-
tains 71 sports events of the last
half century.
* * *
FOOTBALL holds the spotlight
with 26 entries. Excerpts from
University baseball, track, basket-
ball, hockey, swimming, golf, ten-
nis, wrestling and gymnastics
make up a smaller portion of the
book.
Student journalists searched
record books, old newspapers
and magazines and talked to
people associated with sporting
events until they compiled a list
of 200 events.
Seventy-one events chosen by a
panel of six University sports ex-
perts were reported by Dick Lewis,
'53, Lester Sons, '53, Ivan Kaye,
'54, Paul Greenberg, '54, Ed Smith,
'54, Bob Fancett, Grad., George
Flint, '55L. Final drafts are being
drawn up by Ed Whipple, '53, Dick
Wilcox, '53 and Jack Renire, '53.
One of the most striking events
included is the 1898 football vic-
tory over the University of Chi-
cago which inspired a University
student, Louis Elbel, to write "The
Victors."
That game, played before the
formation of the Big Ten Confer-
ence, established University teams
as mythical "Champions of the
West."
An unpublisized event recorded
in the book was a jaunt which
Coach Ray Fisher's Western Con-
ference basketball team took
through the Orient in the spring
of 1929. The team returned home
in the fall after winning 11 out of
13 games against Japanese college
competition.

Loan Prints
A five cent tine per day will
be. charged for all 'Art Print
Loan Pictures returned after
Friday.
Pictures may be returned
from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to
4 p.m. daily until Friday at
Rm. 518 Administration Bldg.
Class of '53
Plans Reunion
Plans for a combined Class of
1953 reunion represent a, signifi-
cant change in the policy of the
Alumni Association according to
John It-Flynn, '53A.
Previously the class treasury has
been split at commencement and
each college has received a share of
it for their individual reunion. This
year a joint treasury will be main-
tained for a combined 1958 reun-
ion.
Film To End Run
Student Legislature Cinema
Guild's feature "How Green Was
My Valley" will finish its run at
8 p.m. today in Architecture Audi-
torium,
presents summer '
formals with
"STAIN SHY"
-th mirnale
in resistant
fabric fminsh! 4.9a

MATH, LANGUAGES:
Varied Courses Offered
In 'U' Summer Session

v
Three special programs will
highlight the University summer,
session.
An institute for mathematics
teachers will be held Aug. 3-14.
Ten recipients of Carnegie grants
will carry on projects begun last
summer in the Latin Workshop.
ELEVEN STUDENTS will take;
part in a summer linguistic'xpro-,
gram aimed at attracting Ameri-
can scholars into language stud-
ies. Students selected are special-
izing or teaching languages and
related subjects, but have not had
the opportunity for formal lin-
guistic study offered in the pro-
gram.

Featured in the summer clas-*
sical studies program is a Latin
workshop, directed by Prof. Wal-
do E. Sweet of the Latin depart-
ment at William Penn Charter
School in Philadelphia.
Teachers from nine states will
work with Prof. Sweet in further
development of his new method of
Latin teaching. Utilizing recent
discoveries about learning of for.
eign languages, Prof. Sweet's
method employs several audio-
visual devices.
In the tmathematics institute,
particular emphasis will be placed
on the use of mathematics in in.
dustry.

S

-Daily-Jeff Pemberton
THE WEE HOURS-Pale and gaunt, Daily City Editor Barnes Connable scans a fast-rolling copy of
the paper for typographical errors. If his ice-cold right eye catches one, the night editor will be
sternly dealt with on the morning critic sheet.
* *'e * * * '4 * * *

paleyd all over the nation.) He also
wrote the story on last spring's
panty raid.
* , * * .
RELIABLE informants insist it
was Connable who incited the riot.
"He incited until 10 p.m.," one
source said, "then went back to
write the story while we phoned in

I

bulletins." Connable denies the
whole thing.
Recently Connable placed the
phone call to Malenkov which
won international newspaper
coverage. He was the only re-
porter last spring at the cele-
brated McPhaul dinner.
Last summer he worked for the
Italian bureau of the Associated
Press and filled The Daily's col.
umns with impressions of Europe.
"I HAVE a dirty job," Connable
says emphatically.
It is. An old Maynard St. max-
im holds that "the city editor is
a rat by definition." His job in-
volves bossing a 60-man news-
gathering staff and over-all su-
pervision of the news pages' pro-
duction.
Another Daily tradition is that
the city editor is always right.
Connable, swathed in a mantle
of infallibility, couldn't miss be-
cause he is a born bluff, accord-
ing to his predecessor Private
Bob Keith, '52.
Keith described Connable's un-
obstrusive arrival on the staf
three years ago.
"He walked in, said I'm Al Con-
nable, and sat down at a typewrit-
er," Keith related. "By the end of
the week we knew he was one of
the best newspapermen to ever hit
this office."
* * *
OCCASIONAL hassles with th
dean's office kept Connable in
school, but his prime concern was
The Daily and related student ac-
tivities.
At the end of his sophomore
year, a group of beer-sodden
men tapped him for Sphinx. He
also joined Toastmasters and a
year later was dubbed "Little
Hollow Thunder" by the Michi-
gamua tribe.
"Some day I'm going to come
back to go to school," Connabli
promises. He expresses consider-
able regret at his extensive class-

e
e

cutting and speaks highly of his
patient professors.
"As for the administration, I
would say it lacks only one thing
-courage," Connable said. By
failure to resist influential pres-
sures, the University is falling
short of its obligations to society,
he believes.
As the wielder of a mean ukelele
(he comes from a musical family:
"My father plays the funeral
march, my mother was a concert
pianist, my brother is a skier and
my sister is in Mexico"), tyrant
city editor, tower of infallibility
and professional bluff, it follows
that Connable should insist on get-
ting sick in heroic proportions.
A fellow senior editor said:
"When Al is sick, we never bring
The Daily to him in the morning.
The most minor typographical er-
'ror might bring on a relapse."

on on interesting careerin telephone work. We
have many excellent positions about which we
would like to tell you.
Also we have.-
NEW INCREASED STARTING WAGES
for al of our positions.
Stop in and let us show you what we have
to offer.
Michigan Bell Telephone COa
323 E. Washington

XWILDSL
stet. te . * h. 'cocas"

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tearing your hair.. DON'T!

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tion of<
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to you

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off; to th
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:te :f ::i:r'':}f::;:".i:1.::.::;: :'.v;i:r'. :~i:
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4-O-T-1-C-E ~n
been here one year the
his month. In celebra-
our anniversary, we
e to make this offer
n treatments for 25% m
he first twelve people
a ticket on May 26.
ckets only will be of-
this price. Good for RJwl
ment offered here.Re
J Health Studio
rty, Phone 2-6428. OPEN EVENINGS
xt to Colonial Yarn Shop

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See our complete stock
of
OUTLINES
for EXAMS
ULRICH'S
549 South University

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Store Hours:
Monday noon
till 8:30
Tuesday thru
Saturday,
9:30 till 5:30

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The night
is young
and
you re so
beautiful .

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SWIM AND SUN
IN CM? j0CSijfPRI'n SWIM SUITS
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Anyone who has ever worn this
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you look so slim, trim, young, and
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with white as bright as sails in the
sun.
1495
Other one- and two-piece Cole
swim suits in cotton and lastex
from $8.95.
Sava-wave swim caps from $1.2 .. }
RverL7h~lor frnm 7 $,. 4 . ? > .6L

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OF FRESH AIR

Our zephyr prints, beaming
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Sumnmer Specialties, these .. .
light,, lithe, and most likely to
succeed on terrace, town, cam-
pus, or theatering.
priced from 17.95 to 39.95

Vital topic on the summer agenda~. . .1
Jonathan Logan's delightful view of a ,
newsworthy neckline -The halter in coolest-of-all-
cottons, Everglazed chambray. Your barest and
most becoming essential for summer flattery
with glistening rhinestone adornment, in
marvelous pastel shades.
Sizes 7-15,

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