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May 22, 1953 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-05-22

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY 22, 1959

_______________________________________________________________________ I I

FROSH! VS. SOPH:
Historic Rivalry Forgotten

Radio-Television Show
Features Binaural SoundI

By ALLAN PRATT
The initiation of a new tradi-
tion by the seniors in conjunction
with the nstallation of the new
"M" seal on the diag brings to
mind the days when every fresh-
man wore a beanie cap and was
in mortal fear of being chased up
a tree by a sophomore.
The University Historical Cdl-
lection, housed in the basement of
the Rackham Building, has on dis-
play several of the old posters pub-
lished by sophomore classes around
the turn of the century.
Always phrased in terms most
uncomplimentary to freshmen,
these posters challengedwthefrosh
to a free-for-all on what was
known as "Black Friday," which
usually occurred in October.
THE CLASS of 1908, for exam-
ple, printed posters declaring, "OH
JOY! FRESHMAN BLOOD! When
the pale moon steals through the
mackerel skies over the cold and
slimy walls of the Medic Building,
(which stood on the site of the
present Randall Physics Building)
where the mouldering dead with-
in, hanging by the ears, dance in
high glee in anticipation of the
coming to their ranks of the
BABES OF 1907. Assemble all ye
VERDANT, PEAGREEN SUCK-
LINGS for your last communion
on this green sphere on Medic
Green, at the hour of seven thirty,
Friday, October the ninth in the
year of our University LXVI."
Following this proclamation
was a list of things forbidden to
freshmen, including smoking on
campus, being out after dark,
visiting either Joe's or the Or-
ient, and being seen without
their beanie caps.
Of course, after reading the
sophomore's challenge, the fresh-
men appeared en masse on the
appointed day. At a signal the
two teams charged each other and
engaged in astruggle for some
campus monument, often the old
Spanish War cannon now standing
behind the General Library.
THIS TUSSLE was no mere
game of tag. Many a student lost
his pants, and hospital cases were
not infrequent. University and Ann
Arbor officials always tried to stop
or at least moderate these affairs,
but with little success.
The tradition of "Black Friday"
continued at least until 1940. The
most recent poster in the Histori-
cal Collections file is a challenge
from the class of '42.
FAMOUS DROSTE and
LINDT CHOCOLATE
plus
BEST FOOD ON CAMPUS
at
Lumbard's University Drug

By ALICE SEITZMAN
Everyone's trying to get into the
extra dimension act.
Taking its cue from 3-D movies,
radio has come up with binaural
sound, exhibited by the speech de-
partment at its recent radio-tele-
vision festival.
TO DEMONSTRATE this com-
paratively new development var-
ious sound effects were used. Part
of the program featured sounds
such as doors slamming, footsteps
crossing a room and two simultan-
eous conversations.
Listeners found, to their
amazement, that they not only
were able to hear footsteps, but
could also tell their exact loca-
tion in the room.
Another effect consisted of the
sound of a cowbell approaching
and then fading away. Binaural
sound gave the impression of a
cow passing from left to right in
the room.
When the tinkle was accidental-
ly interrupted for a moment it
seemed as if the cow had suddenly
umped a few yards before resum-
ing its stroll.
TO ACHIEVE these impressions
it is necessary to use two separate
microphones, transmission sys-
tems and speakers. The resuit is
more depth of volume as well as a4
sense of direction.
Binaural sound, though barely
past the experimental stage, has
already been incorporated intoj
regular broadcasts at WQXR in
New York and has been tried
with success at a Detroit radio
station. The problem of employ-
ing two separate broadcasting
systems is solved by the use of
both AM and FM frequencies.
The most striking example of
what can be done with this tech-
nique is in Cinerama, where the

sound is channeled through seven
different systems.
According to Mike Berla, Grad.,
producer of the demonstration, the
future of binaural sound in radio
itself is dubious because it is "al-
most too good for radio drama." It
may, however, find application in
tape and disk recordings. The ul-
timate goal of research in this
field, according to Berla, will be
reached when binaural sound is
combined with full color three-
dimensional television to pro-
duce something approaching the
"feelies" of Aldous Huxley.
Aiken To Tall
On Santa yana
"The Aesthetic Theory of George
Santayana" will be the topic of a
lecture by Prof. Henry D. Aiken
of the philosophy department at
8 p.m. today in the East Confer-
ence Rm. of the Rackham Bldg.
The lecture, sponsored by the
Acolytes, graduate philosophy club,
is open to the public.

Book Trade
Collection of books for the
SL Book Exchange will take
place June 1 to 5.
There will be collection booths
on the Diag and in the SL Bldg.,
with one agent in each housing
unit.
Anyone interested in work-
ing on the collections may call
Betty Magyar, '54, at 23279.
ROTC Honors
Three Cadets
Scabbard and Blade awards for
the outstanding sophomore ROTC
students have been presented to
Douglas Robinson, '55E, of the
AROTC, William Weber, '55E, of
the NROTC, and Robert Miller,
'55, of the ROTC. ?
Presentation was made on the
basis of outstanding military bear-
ing, leadership and military sci-
ence grades.
Moffett To Speak
Miss Ruth Moffett, international
commentator, author and lectur-
er, will speak on "Adam to Atom"
at 8 p.m. (today) in the League.
Miss Moffett's talk is sponsored
by the Baha'i World Faith.

The unusual combination of the
University Symphony Orchestra,
the Stanley Quartet and a Festi-
val String Orchestra of 170 high
school musicians will present a'
concert at 4:15 p.m. Sunday in
Hill Auditorium.
Seating two orchestras in the
second balcony and two on the'
stage, the group will play "Sere-
nade for Four Orchestras" by Mo-
zart. The composition is largely a;
musical statement and a series of
echos.
A double string orchestra and
the Stanley Quartet will play
"Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas
Tallis" by Vaughan Williams. This
is the first time this work has been
performed in Ann *Arbor.
The Chausson "Symphony in B
flat major," which has not been'
performed here since 1948 will
also be performed by the Univer-
sity Orchestra.
To close the program, the Uni-
versity Orchestra and the Festi-
val String Orchestra will play the
"Soirees Musicales," by Benjamin
Britten.

Orchestras Discussion Set
To Perform For TV Hour

A

A discussion of governments
past, present and future, with
special emphasis on a comparison
between those of the United
States and Russia will highlight
the University Television Hour at
1 p.m. Sunday.
Also stated for the hour-long
program is a talk on the import-
ance of iodine in the functioning
of the thyroid gland by Prof. Ade-
lia W. Beeuwkes of the School of
Public Health and Dr. Harry
Towsley of the Medical School.
Listing of Roomis
To Close Today
From 3 to 5 p.m. today is the
deadline for notifying the Union's
student offices of guest rooms
available locally for weekend
guests.
Anyone wth such accommoda-
tions available is urged to contact
the offices immediately. Union of-
ficials expect the housing list to
prove useful on crowded football
and commencement weekends.

I

4

1a

HEAR THE BOSTON SYMPHONY AT YOUR LEISURE ON

,

CHALLENGING POSTERS
Navy Cadets To Visit Europe,
Caribbean on Vacation Cruise

RCA

VICTOR

Loft-Pi la
or 45 RIPMl

RECORDS

For 114 midshipmen in the Naval
ROTC program the problem of
what to do this summer has been
pretty well taken care of by Uncle
Sam.
Approximately 57 midshipmen
will find themselves in Norfolk,
Virginia about July 13 preparing
to ship out on the Second Cruise
of the Navy's Summer Training
program for Naval Academy and
NROTC cadets.
A PART of the 1,543 NROTC
sophomores and seniors from 27
colleges, University students will
participate in the cruise, which
will include a squadron of 13 ships.
They will leave Norfolk for the
open sea, splitting up so that half
the squadron will arrive at Edin-
burgh, Scotland and the other
half at Bergen, Norway, July 27.
Ships visiting Edinburgh will
drop anchor for their second
port of call, Oslo, Norway
around August 3.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

Those visiting Bergen will call
at Copenhagen, Denmark at ap-
proximately the same time.
1(6 k.5
ALL THE SHIPS of the cruise
will then meet on August 10 and
head for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
where they will wind up summer
exercises, departing for the United
States August 31.
Fifty-seven other NROTC ca-
dets will find themselves divided
into three groups with 16 cadets
going on the Third Cruise of the
summer in which 1,130 contract
seniors will participate. They will
visit three ports in the Caribbean.
Another group consisting of 36
juniors will receive three weeks of
amphibious training at the Naval
Amphibious Base, Little Creek,
Virginia and three weeks of avia-
tion training at Corpus Christi,
Texas to wind up "Operation NAR-
MID '54" officially known as Naval
Reserve Midshipmen of the 'Class
of 1954.

Conducted by Charles Munch
SYMPHONY NO. 1 "SPRING" (Schumann) - SYMPHONY NO. 2 (Schubert)
SYMPHONY NO. 4 (Brahms) - SYMPHONY NO. 7 (Beethoven)
PIANO CONCERTO NO. 2 IN B FLAT - ARTUR RUBINSTEIN (Brahms)
Conducted by Serge Koussevtzky
AlA MERE L'OYE (Rai('4) - SYMPHONY NO. 2 (Sibelius)
SUITES.1 & 4 (J.S. Bach) - SYMPHONY NO. 4 (Tchaikovsky )
Conducted by Pierre Mouteux
IL SACRE DU PRINTEIMPS (Stravinsky)
(RECOMMENDED LISTENING: EVENING SERENADE - WHRV 6:30, Monclay-Friday)

I

Languiage Grou1p
To PicnicToday
Spanish food, a musical program
and election of officers will high-
light the Spanish Club picnicI
which will be held today at Pat-
terson Lake.
Tickets may be purchased for 85'
cents in the Romance Language
Bldg. Those planning to go may
meet at 5:30 p.m. near the flag-
pole.
Daily ChissifiedIs

6

- CAMPUS -
211 S. State St.
Phone 9013

MUSIC SHOPS

-- DOWNTOWN -
205 E. Liberty St.
Phone 2-0675

0

I

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I.

-ii1

I

THAT'S RIGHT!
We have -
* ICE COLD BEER
" SOFT DRINKS!
*WINE
at/

This Summer Or Next Fall
Room& Boardor Board only
*ooEconomical living ... sharing work cuts
cost... large scale purchasing means good food
at wholesale prices.
S*AdUlf responsibilities .. .and privileges in
homes that are student-controlled and owned.
Democratic ideals .. . no racial,
religious, political, social discrimination.
the Inter-Cooperative council, Inc.
If YOU Enjoy both working with a group and
maintaining your own individuality-if you are willing to share
responsibility and contribute to the welfare of the group-if
you will appreciate abundant opportunities for a full social
and intellectual life-JOIN COOPS!
for information

J

-1

I

'4

Open 10 A.M.-,10 P.M.
Sunday, Noon - 7 P.M.
Phone 7191

I

lli I

*

1111

.

Ai

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