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May 20, 1953 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1953-05-20

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-'4

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 1953

I I

4

Meisel Cites Russian Press
Releases as 'Peace Drive'

By BOB FLOUM
The recent emphasis by the So-
Viet press for "more butter and less
cannon," has been cited by Prof.
James M. Meisel of the political
science department as part of Rus-
sia's recent peace drive.
Prof. Meisel pointed out that the
recent rush of Russian consumers
for more and better goods and bet-
ter housing is an "interesting sym-
ptom rather than an evidence of
fact."
Quadrants Tap
New Members
South Qnadrangle Quadrants,
Men's Residence Halls honorary,
yesterday formally initiated fif-
teen new members.
Tapped by the quadrangle hon-
orary were Dolf Bass, '56, Jacques
Brabant, '54E, Richard DeSwarte,
'53, Theodore Ginsberg, BAd,
Jack Gray, Richard Harper, Grad.,
David Holland, '54 and Frank
Johnston, '55. Also honored were
William Land, A&D, Harold Lynde,
'55, Robert Mann, '54BAd, James
McClurg, '55, Gilbert McHahon,
'53SM, Charles Sacqu'ety, '55SM,
and Gerard Van Otterin, '56A.
Speaking at a brief presentation
ceremony for the initiates, Dean
of Students Erich A. Walter com-
plimented the group for its "con-
tribution t the University com-
munity."
Dean of Men Walter B. Rea was
made an honorary Quadrant at
the ceremony.
Klein To Lead
The University Choirs, Maynard
Klein conducting, will give a pub-
lic concert at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow
at Hill Auditorium.
The soloists will be Ruth Orr,
Grad., soprano, Mary Roosa, '55,
contralto, Charles Green, '54SM,
tenor, and Robe'rt Kerns, '54SM,
baritone. They will be accompan-
ied by Mary Catherine Hutchins,
'55SM, and William Doppman, '56
SM.
Among the works that will be
performed are Mozart's "Requiem"
and Stravinsky's "Symphonie de
Psaumes."
(ADVERTISEMENT)
OPTOMETRY IN THREE
YEARS, IF YOU HAVE
SIXTY L.A. CREDITS
In three college years, you can prepare
for the attractive profession of optome-
try, if you have a minimum of sixty
required Liberal Arts credits.1
There is a shortage of optometrists in
many States. Eighty per cent of the
Nation's millions depend upon the Doc-
tor of Optometry and his professional
skill in conserying vision.
The optometrist possesses the dignity
of being a professional man. He renders
a service essential to the health and
well-being of his community. Substan-
tial financial rewards are obtainable al-
most from the beginning of his practice.
Optometry is specially attractive to
women.
The U. S. Department of Defense and
Selective service grant optometry stu-
dents the same consideration accorded
medical students.
Chicago College of Optometry, nation-
ally accredited, is located in the heart
of the world's greatest center for teach-
tc ing in the healing arts. It is famous for
its eye clinic. A building programis in
progress. Dormitory accommodations,
apartments and other facilities are
available on a large campus.
For catalog and other literature, ad-
dress Registrar, Chicago College of Op-
tomer r350 Belden Ave., Chicago 14.
Today and Thursday

IT IS A follow up by the post-
Stalin regime upon their own po-
pulation to put more stress upon
housing and consumer goods and
to try to raise the standard of liv-
ing.
The Soviet newspaper, Izves-
tia, has reported that there are
about 26,000,000 square yards of
housing space. The average
resident of Moscow today, how-
ever, has only a little more than
five yards of space to himself.
By 1960, Izvestia says that Mos-
cow's housing space is to be in-
creased by one-third or more.
During this same period resi-
dents are promised 400 new school
buildings, hospitals with 26,000
beds, and movie theaters with a
total of 25,000 seats.
Prof. Meisel stated that there
is an indication in their plan to
put more emphasis today on capi-
tal goods with the idea, "We won't
eat today, but our children will
eat tomorrow."
This emphasis by the Soviet
press during the recent month has
been labeled as psychological pro-
paganda aimed at both the Am-
erican people and the Russian
people, Prof. Meisel added.
Consumers
End Meeting
Managers of 45 State consum-
er finance organizations will close
their two-day meeting under the
joint sponsorship of the business
administration school, the Uni-
versity Extension Service and the
Michigan Consumer Finance Asso-
ciation today.
This afternoon's conference ses-
sion will be devoted to talks on
"Collecting Your Account and
Saving It" by Victor Williams of a
Jackson finance service and "Man-
agement and Effective Business
Letters" by Prof. Dorothy Green-
wald of the School of Business Ad-
ministration.
"The Place of Consumer Finance
Companies in the Economic and
Social Economy" was the topic of
yesterday's panel discussion held
under the direction of Prof. Paul
W. McCracken of the School of
Business Administration.
McNaug ht Awards
To Be Presenwed
The Journalism Department will
hold its Honors Assembly at 3 p.m.
today in Auditorium A, Angell
IHall.
V. V. Mcitt, President of the
McNaught Syndicate in New York,
will be guest speaker and will also
deliver the McNaught Awards for
outstanding work in the depart-
ment
Fordham University
SCHOOL OF LAW
NEW YORK
Three-Year Day Course
Four-Year Evening Course
CO-EDUCATIONAL
Member Assn. of American
Law Schools
Matriculants must be College grad-
uates and present full trans-
er t of College record.
Classes Begin Sept. 28, 1953
For further information address
Registrar Fordham
University School of Law
302 Broadway, New York 7, N. Y.

Public Health
NeedsTold
"We are always on the firing
line to meet the hazards of the fu-
ture" said Dr. Haven Emerson,
professor emeritus at Columbia
University yesterday in an address
before the School of Public Health.
Speaking on the Next Steps
in Public Health," Dr. Emerson
outlined a seven-point plan neces-
sary for the improvement and
advancement of public health. He
explained that the first step vital
to the initiation of these points
is the establishment of a local
health council, endowed with local
jurisdiction powers. Above all, he
stressed, we "must be aware of
our medical care needs."

siren indicates (at intervals
to 4:15 p.m.) that exercises
held in Yost Field House,
should go directly there and
by Marshals.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Rosm 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 1953
Vol. LXIII, No. 160
Notices
Student Tea. President and Mrs.
Hatcher will be at home to students
from 4 to 6 o'clock Wednesday, May 20.
Attention June Graduates, College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts, School
of Education, School of Music, and
School of Public Health :
Students are advised not to request
grades of I or X in June. When such
grades are absolutely imperative, the
work must be made up in time to allow
your instructor to report the make-up
grade not later than 4 p.m., Sun., June
7, 1953. Grades received after that time
may defer the student's graduation3
until a later date.
College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts. All students wishing to at-
tend summer sessions at schools else-
where must file approval sheets in the
Office of the Director of Admissions,
1524 Administration Building, before
June 1.
Recommendations for Departmental
Honors. Teaching departments wishing
to recommend tentative June gradu-
ates from the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts and the School
of Education for departmental honors
should recommend such students in a
letter sent to the Registrar's Office, 1513
Administration Building, by 12:30 p.m.
Sat., June 6, 1953.
Selective Service Examination Make-
up. Students taking the Selective Ser-
vice College Qualification Test on May
21 are requested to report to 100 Hutch-
ins Hall, Thursday morning at 8:30.
PLANS FOR COMMENCEMENT
EXERCISES-JUNE 13, 1953
To be held at 5:30 p.m. either in
the Stadium or Yost Field House de-
pending on the weather. Exercises will
conclude about 7 p.m.
Those eligible to participate: Grad-
uates of Summer Session of 1952 and
of February and June, 1953. Graduates
of the Summer Session of 1953 and of
February, 1954, are not supposed to
participate; however, no check is made
of those taking part in the ceremony,
but no tickets are available for those
in this classification.
Tickets: For Yost Field House: Two to
each prospective graduate, to be dis-
tributed from Mon., June 1, to 12 noon
on Sat., June 13, at Cashier's Office,
first floor of Administration Building;
For Stadium: No tickets necessary.
Children not admitted unless accom-
panied by adults.
Academic Costume: Can be rented at
Moe Sport Shop, North University
Avenue, Ann Arbor.
Assembly for Graduates: At 4:30 p.m.
in area east of Stadium.' Marshals will
direct graduates to proper stations. If

from 4:00
are to be
graduates
be seated

Spectators: Stadium: Enter by Main
Street gates only. All should be seated
by 5 p.m., when procession enters field.
Yost Field House: Only those holding
tickets can be admitted, owing to lack
of space. Enter on State Street, oppo-
site McKinley Avenue.
Alufmni Reunions: Headquarters at
Alumni Memorial Hall. Registration on
June 11, 12, and 13.
Alumni Luncheon: Sat., June 13, 12
Noon, in Waterman Gymnasium. Ad-
mission of Alumni by badge. Relatives
and friends by tickets provided at
Alumni headquarters.
Graduation Announcements, Invita-
tions, Class Rings, Pins, etc.: Inquire
at Office of Student Affairs.
Commencement Programs: To be dis-
tirbuted at Stadium or Yost Field
House.
Housing: Alumni should apply at Reg-
istration Desk. Alumni Memorial Hall:
all others at Residence Halls Office in
the Administration Building.
The American Committee on United
Europe announces a scholarship in the
amount of $1,750 for an American col-
lege graduate to attend the 1953-54 ses-
sion of the College of Europe. The
scholarship includes tuition, board,
lodging, laundry, $10 per month pocket
money, transportation from New York
to Bruges, Belgium, and return, and.
an incidental expense allowance of
$250.
The College of Europe stipulates the
following requirements for admission:
1) Applicants must be less than 30
years of age on Oct. 1, 1953. 2) Appli-
cants must be single. 3) Applicants
must havea fluent command of both
of the College's official languages, Eng-
lish and French. 4) Applicants must
show a satisfactory academicarecord
and possess a degree from an accredit-
ed institution. 5) Applicants must pre-
sent a certificate of good health and a
recent photograph.
Applications for the scholarship
should be addressed to "Scholarship,
American Committee on United Eur-
ope, 537 Fifth Avenue, New York 17,
N.Y., and should contain the follow-
ing information: 1) Name, address, age,
marital status. 2) Full educational
background, including transcripts of
academic records, and a summary of
educational training, including relevant
extra curricular activities and special
projects. 3) A concise summary of other
relevant experience such as foreign
travel, employment, armed services, etc.
4) Aptitude in foreign languages. 5)
Two supporting letters of recommenda-
tion from teachers familiar with the
student's work. 6) A concise summary
of the applicant's reasons for wishing
to study at the College of Europe and
what he plans to accomplish there.
7) A recent photograph and certificate
of health. Applications must be re-
ceived by June 30, 1953.
Hillel' Foundation. Applications are
now being accepted from students who
wish to reside in the Hillel dormitory
during summer school and the fall ses-
sion. Students interested should apply
for application forms at the Founda-
tion daily between 9 a.m. and 5:30
p.m. All applications must be in by
May 25.
The Principal of the High School,
White Plains, New York, will be in the

__
I i i

office of the Bureau of Appointments
on Thurs., May 21, to interview candi-
dates interested in and qualified to
teach English, social studies, mathe-
matics, general science and biology,
women's physical education, or guid-
ance. A master's degree and teaching
experience are required. Candidates de-
siring interviews on Thursday should
contact the Bureau of Appointments,
Ext. 489, at once.
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT.
Bureau of Appointments' weekly sum-~
mer plamement meeting will be held
Thursday afternoon from 1 to 5 p.m.!
in Room 3-A of the Michigan Union:
All students interested in either camp,
resort, business, or industrial employ-
ment are invited to attend. New re-
quests received by the Bureau Include
the Buick plant in Flint and the Fisher
Body plant in Pontiac.
Childcraft, a Marshall Field enter-
prise, will have a representative at the
Michigan Union from 1 to 5 p.m. in
Room 3-B Thursday afternoon to talk
to all interested students about their
sales program for this summer,
Russell Kelly Office Service of Detroit
will have a representative at the Mich-
igan Union Thursday afternoon from
3 to 5 p.m. In Room 3-A to talk to all
students interested in clerical employ-
men~t in the Detroit area this summer.
Summer Camp. Mr. Ken Smith of
Camp Charlevoix will be in the Michi-
gan Union Thursday afternoon to in-
terview prospective men counselors for
handicraft, riflery, tennis, and gen-
eral counselors. Call Bureau of Ap-
pointments, University Extensipn 2614
for appointments.
Summer Camp Employment. Mr.
DouglasSalisbury of Camp Nissokone
needs cabin counselors. Also a camp
nurse. Positions are open for one mar-
ried couple, if husband has had ex-
perience driving a truck and wife has
had nursing or bookkeeping experience.
Mr. Salisbury will be in the Michigan
Union Fri.,' May 22, from 4 to 6:30 p.m.
PERSONNEL INTERVIEW┬ž.
A representative from the U. S. Navy
Recruiting Station will be at the Bureau
of Appointments on Tues., May 26, to
interview women students for positions
as Typists and Stenographers at Navy
Headquarters in Washington, D.C.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS.
Timken Detroit Axle Co. would like
to hear from men graduates who would
be interested in their Industrial Man-
agement Training Program. Applicants
should have some industrial experience
or an engineering background.
The City of Detroit Civil Service
Commission has announced vacancies
for the positions of Junior Art Curator
and Medical Laboratory Aid (Female).
Requirements for the Jr. Art Curator
include a degree with specialization in
art and some advanced training in the
field of art. Although a degree is not
required for the Medical Laboratory
Aid, some experience in a chemical,
medical research, or public health lab-
oratory is preferred.
The Michigan Civil Service Commis-
sion has released examination dates for
the positions of Social Worker A-1,
Student Psychiatric Social Worker A,
Building Construction Superintendents
III-A and IV. Further information may
be secured at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments.
The Gulf Research & Development
Co. in Pittsburgh, Pa., has an opening
for an Assistant in Structural Geology
(Continued on page 4)

*.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 PM.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline doily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST - Pair of horn-rimmed glasses,
Sat, night between Hill Aud, and S.Q.
Ph. 3-0521. Ext. 412. ) 50L
LOST-A half used check-book for Ann
Arbor Bank. - Call 25-0153 after 6
o'clock. ) 52L
LOST - Monday P.M., Dunlop-Maxply
tennis racket, at women's court. Ph.
3-1511, ext. 702. Reward. ) 51L
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c: Shorts, 69c: military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )7B
PARAKEETS, babies and breeders, ca-
naries, singers, cages, and supplies.
305 W. Hoover. Phone 2-2403. )1F
1947 HUDSON - Excellent condition;
radio, heater, overdrive, extra tires.
$395. Ph. 6-1511 Ext. 2766. )115F
21" ADMIRAL TELEVISION, table mod-
el. Brand pew-still in crate. Price
$190. (Retails for $220.) Call 3-2512.
1949 HARLEY-DAVIDSON 125 - Good
condition $150. Inquire Ray Wright,
123 N. Thayer, after 6:00. )118P"
DENTAL 'SUITE for sale. Reasonable.
Beautiful, modern, complete. Twenty
years general practice on central lo-
cation available at low rent. Phone
TRinity 4-0162 or 2-3481 or write M.
Rawsthorne, 749 Pallister, Detroit 2,
Mich. )119F
ENGLISH motorcycle, 1952 B.S.A. 250 cc
rear-springer. Excellent condition.
Ph. Ext. 2-880 or 3-0341. )120F
MICROSCOPE - AO Spencer medical.;
HP, LP, oil; mech. stage, case, nearly
new. Call 3-8708 eve. )122F
CANARIES - Beautiful singers r& fe-
males. Parakeets $7 and up. Mrs.
Ruffins, 562 S. Seventh. )123F
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS, roomettes and apartments by
day or week for campus visitors. Cam-
pus Tourist Homes, 518 E. William.
Phone 3-8454. )3D

ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS for male students. Suites.
'Double rooms. Separate kitchen with
%cooking privileges. ? block from cam-
pus. Summer. 417 E. Liberty. )31D
RESERVE summer, fall rooms. Private.
Near campus. maid service. Modern
bath and refrigerator privileges. Call
2-7108. )39D
SUITE for 3, preferably G.I.'s. Part time
work to defray cost. Also garage for
rent. Also, single room with board.
520 Thompson. )52D
SUMMER Students: room or board in
fraternity; 1 block to campus. Rent:
4.50-5.50 weekly. Ph. 3-4187. )44D
ROOM AND BOARD
ATTENTION Summer Students-Excel-
lent meals Monday-Friday, $2 a day.
Call Jesse, Chi Phi 2-7363. )SS
ROOM AND BOARD for Summer in
Fraternity close to campus. Open all
Summer. Call 2-8312 after 7:00 P.M.
)8S
PERSONAL
BRANDY is going to Senior Ball Sat.
)26L
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS to Calif., share expenses, leave
after June 6. Phone 317 Hinsdale
E.Q. evenings. )19T
TAKING CAR to California early June.
Want companion to share driving,
expenses. Box 12 Daily. )20T
BUSINESS SERVICES
TtPEWRITERS: Portable and Standard
for rent, sale and servile.
Morrill's n
314 S. State St., Phone 7177 )2B
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty,.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020. )23B
TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.
)4B

HELP WANTED
PART TIME experienced shoe salesman,
male or female. Excellent salary.
Hours arranged to your schedule.
Randall's. 306 S. State. )55H
WANTED - Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Openings now, in summer, and
next fall. Top pay, early morning
hours. Call circulation Dept. 2-3241.
)56H
STENOGRAPHER-TYPIST for editorial
office of national medical journal.
Good opportunity to learn details of
medical publishing. Please write RA-
DIOLOGY. 2842 W. Grand Blvd., De-
troit, 2. Mich., giving qualifications
and experience. )38H
WANTED-Taxi Cab drivers, full or part
time. Yellow & Checker Cab Co. 113
S. Ashley. Ph. 9382. )54H
PART OR FULL TIME Summer help
wanted at Honey Brook Farm Market.
Wages plus fruit, vegetables, eggs so
forth. Marshall Richards 6400 Jack-
son Rd. Ph. 25-8513.
TEACHERS-Register with us for em-
ployment or advancement. No regis-
tration fee required. Jobs also open
for engineers, secretaries, and typists.
AA Personnel service, 207 Municipal
Court Bldg. Ph, 2-1221, hrs. 9-5 Mon.
thru Fri., 9-12 Saturdays. )60H
MUSICIANS-Here for summer session,
steady jobbing. For details write
Chuck Ritz, 129 Lawrence, Detroit 2.
)61H
FOR RENT
CAMPUS-2 singles, 1 double. Lounging
room, kitchen privilege if desired.
120 North Ingells. Ph. 3-0746 or 3-0166.
)170
FURNISHED or unfurnished 2-bedroom
campus Apt, available May 1. Private
bath. Phone 3-8454. )120
FOR SUMMER-Furnished knotty-pine
2 room apartment. Private bath. $56.
Ph. 3-2641 after six. )21C
MISCELLANEOUS
ARE YOU A WRITER? Do you weit
$20? Enter the Gargoyle Hophead
Short Story Contest. Deadline ia
May 15. )9M
4 BURKE WOODS, 8 matched Spalding
irons, all in good condition. $30. Call
3-0401 evenings. )121F
DON'T DISCARD your used clothing.
Bring it to the Salvation Army, 220
S. Washington.' )16M
SEN IORS
enjoy Time, Life, etc. next year at
low student rates by phoning 6007
now. Save 12c per copy. )17M
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

I

4.

4'

RADIO SERVICE
Auto -- Home - Portable
Phono & TV
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & TV
. "Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1% blocks east of East Eng.

)1B

STUDENTS - Take advantage of our
special rates. Phone 6007. Charge your
order. We handle change of address
in June. Student Periodical Agency.
)25B
EXPERT TYPIST - Rates reasonable.
Prompt service. 914 Mary Street.
3-4449. )8B

'1
I'

Fabulous!.
Colossal!
(A) 2
SATURDAY, MAY 23 $2.25 per Couple
LEAGUE BALLROOM Semi-Formal
PAUL McDONOUGH
and his cool, crazy orchestra
Tickets on sole at Administration Bldg. 2-5 P.M.
- -- - - - - - - --I- - - - -

MINIMUM THIS SUMMER
$600.00
IN MICHIGAN
Fascinating summer assignment
pays you guaranteed income with
opportunity to earn over $1000.00.
Openings for college men and
women to assist the director of
CHILDCRAFT in your home com-
munity.
A MARSHALL FIELD OWNED
ORGANIZATION
Ask for Mr. Gibson, Michigan
Union, Summer Placement
Thurs., March 12-1 to 5 P.M.

I

Top CASH.Prices
Paid for your used
T EXTBOOKS
Sell them now before they're
out of date ... Sell at
FO LLETT'S

I

44

State Street at North U.

--.7-Z = 7

.... ....

NEW SCREEN - NEW SOUND - NEW PROJECTION

I

II

CinenaSL ui/d
4 NIGHTS - STARTING THURSDAY
John Ford's
HO WGREEN
WAS MY VALLEY
WINNER OF SEVEN ACADEMY AWARDS
- DIRECTOR - PICTURE - ACTING - PHOTOGRAPHY --

Ill

WHEN FRIDAYCJMES I'LL BE A LONELY DOG!
EVERYBODY AT OUR HOUSE IS PLANNING To SEE
"TROUBLE ALONG THlE WAY.
EVEN JUNIOR IS GOING! 9ee! IT MUST
BE A DOGGONE GOOD SHOW TO MAKE

A PAL RUN OUT (

__

)N YOU!
--
~-

ti
;4

t
-:

iI

WALTER I
PIDGEON

MAUREEN
O'HARA

| BARRYITERD
SFITZGERALD |

DONALD
CRISP

i

I

It---'"
t
"

-- --_--
__

A STATEMENT FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES:
"A motion picture of great poetic charm and dignity, a picture
rich in visual fabrication and in the vigor of its imagery. An
outstanding film concerned with the sharp contrasts of natural
beauties and the harsh realities of a Welsh mining town. A
stunning masterpiece. You can never expect to see a film more
handsomely played." - Bosley Crowther.
Extra! "Riff Raff Daffy" - Technicolor Cartoon

'N~ .9%~(

I

II!

That All-Man
"Quiet Man" Has A New Kind Of Dame To Tame in -
one of the swellest pictures ever to come your way!
ANER BROS. HAPPILY PRESENT
I JOHN DONNA CHARLES
W vui 03mM

I

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!

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