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May 17, 1953 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-05-17

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SUNDAY, MAY 17, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

t
5
1

PAGL THREE

TH ICIANDIY E 1E

aasw as a.:a a. a" _ ..

i

ols ctory String Broken

SEVEN OUT OF EIGHT:

Michigan Netters Crush Ohio State, 9-0

scoreboard
. ..by Dick Lewis

Ross, Mead
Lead Track
Performers
(Continued from Page 1)

'M' Linksters Defeat MSC,
Purdue, Lose to Ohio State
Boilermakers' Benning Wins Honors;
Stevens Low Man for Wolverines

AS A DISAPPOINTING SPRINTER on the Michigan track team
suggested, I paid a visit to Ferry Field yesterday and believe it or
not I didn't lose my way. All I lost was the slightest glimmer of hope
that I had been retaining for some time that Michigan might score
one of the big upsets of the outdoor track season in turning back the
supposedly depleted Illinois outfit.
What I saw was, with a few noteworthy exceptions, one of the
worst clutch performances ever turned in by the team that one letter-
writer calls "one of the top three aggregations in the world." But
some of the fans sitting around me took the stunning defeat in stride
-as if it was something they were used to and never hoped to over-
come. They evidently felt that with things the way they are now,
and barring some misfortune, it would be a long time before a Wol-
verine track squad ever beat Illinois when the chips were down,
whether in dual or conference competition.
Don't get me wrong. The whole team didn't roll over and
play dead. A couple of Canham's thinelads turned in performan-
ces that would have stood up against any kind of opposition. John
Ross's double triumph, with a thrilling last-gasp kick to win the
880, was an excellent demonstration of athletic prowess and super-
ior coaching. Fritz Nilsson, the transplanted Swede, also showed
that he is reaching peak form with his decisive wins in the shot
put and the discus. Milt Mead, with the eyes of everyone in Ferry
Field gaping at him, rose to even greater heights (6-8/) in his
high jump specialty-something he didn't start training for until
the conclusion of the basketball season.
But there the similarity between a championship track team and
just another second place outfit ended. Disappointments came thick
and fast. Fleet Jack Carroll, recently rumored a victim of over-train-
ing, faded badly in the 440-yard dash and salvaged only a third as
Illinois finished one-two. The crowd groaned. Van Bruner failed in
both hurdles events and only the reversal of a judge's decision enabled
the Wolverines to garner even a second place over the low sticks.
The writers groaned. Big Ten indoor two-mile champion George
Lynch suffered a heart-breaking setback in the last 50 yards as he
too ran out of gas. The coaches and officials groaned. Then the
topper-the dropping of the baton in the nip-and-tuck mile relay
event -put the finishing touches on the Maize and Blue failure and
at the same time nullified a splendid anchor leg by Carroll.
* * * *
Second Not Enough.. .
GRANTED THAT THERE'S NOTHING radically wrong with a team
that finishes perennially in the second position. It's got sufficient
power and depth to beat out eight other teams but not the ninth,
and that's the trouble. A horse can win plenty of money year afterI
year by finishing second in the big stakes events. But what does it
get him? Nothing more than recognition as a good thoroughbred
that just never could make the top rung. The same horse, every1
once and a while, may take time out from his second place finishes in
the stakes events to go in an allowance or warmup test. He might'
even set a track or world's record. Only when the big money was up
for grabs the horse is still second best and he doesn't pick up either
the bulk of the cash or the plaudits of the crowd. The horse, evenI
though he's earning valuable place money for his owner, is a rela-
tive disappointment.
That's just the way it's been for five years at Michigan. Sec-
ond best. It couldn't be our recruiting methods that are at fault.
It's obvious that Michigan has some sort of working agreement
with our good neighbor to the North that pays off in winning,
orowd-pleasing runners. Reports of insufficient track budgets to
the contrary, Michigan has managed since 1948 to have at least
one and most of the years many standout performers in every
one of the different track departments.
There certainly have been plenty of potentially good racers from
the state of Michigan to choose from. High School championships are
usually held in Michigan's own back yard every season, and it's obvious
toeven the casual observer that the talent is there-ready for the
pickings.
S ng.* * . ,
Rate Coaches High .. .
ON TOP OF THAT, and regardless of other impressions, we've got
a coaching staff that is regarded by most of the boys in the
know as one of the best in the business. Their athletes will stand by
them, try to win for them, and even write letters to defend them,
even though it's pretty tough to defend the frustration of being
second best.
What then is wrong? Obviously there's some unaccountable
factor that's keeping Michigan from reaching the top. I tried to
find it when I threaded my way (thanks for the directions) to
Ferry Field yesterday as I have for four years while covering
Michigan track for a national wire service. And the runners, just
like all the other times, ran counter-clockwise in a most orderly
fashion.
Only the ones with the orange and blue stripes on their trunks
seemed to have that little extra ounce of something that made the
difference. In the parlance of the sports world they call it class-
something which Michigan, too, can boast of, except when it meets
Illinois.

IN THE 880, Ross, after trail-
ing Illini Gene Maynard, Wolver-
ine Roy Christiansen, and Illini
Stacey Siders for almost three-
quarters of the race, took off like
a shot on the back stretch, dash-
ed into the lead, and then fought
off a last ditch effort by Maynard
to win his second event of the day.
Nilsson heaved the 16-pound
shot 54 feet, 10 inches to better
the old meet record of 54 feet,
1%/inches set back in 1939 by
Bill Watson of Michigan. His
toss of 158 feet, 5q inches in
the discus was five and a half
inches better than the previous
dual meet record, also set by
Watson.
The biggest disappointment of
the day from the Michigan stand-
point, outside of losing the meet,
was the failure of its champion-
ship mile relay team to win its
event. The Maize and Blue baton
was dropped during the exchange
between Bill Barton and Dan
Hickman at the half-way point in
the race and consequently the Illi-
nois quartet ran off with the vic-
tory.
* * *
LEO JOHNSON'S Illinois power-
house also garnered first and sec-
ond place finishes in the 440-yard
dash, the broad jump, and the pole
vault.
Ralph Fessenden turned on a
burst of speed to lead teammate
Siders across the finish line in the
quarter - mile dash. Wolverine
Jack Carroll lead most of the way
but wound up in third place be-
hind the Illinois speedsters. The
winning time was an exceptionally
good 48.6.
In the broad jump, Illinois' Tom
Floyd leaped 22 feet, 11% inches
to take the event. McNulty, win-
ner of two other events, was sec-
ond place finisher ahead of Mich-
igan's Dave Stinson. Dale Foster
won the pole vault for the Illini
with a vault of 13 feet. Wolverine
Roger Maugh and Illini Jim
Wright tied for second place with
vaults of 12 feet, 6 inches.
* * *
100-YARD DASH-1. Williams (I); 2.
Corley (1); 3. Coates (M). Time: 9.8
120-YARD HIGH HURDLES-i. Mc-
Nulty (I); 2. Thomson (); 3. Bru-
ner (M). Time: 14.2 (tied meet rec-
ord
220-YARD LOW HURDLES-1. McNul
ty (I); 2. Love (M); 3. Thomson (I).
Time: 24.
220-YARD DASH-1. Williams (I); 2.
Corley (I); 3. Hessler (M). Time:
22.2
440-Yard Dash-1. Fessenden (); 2.
Siders (); 3. Carroll (M). Time:
48.6
880-YARD RUN-1. Ross (M); 2. May-
nard (I); 3. Siders (I). Time: 1:53.7
ONE-MILE RUN-1. Ross (M); 2. Jews-
bury (I); 3. Moule (M). Time: 4:11.4
(new meet record)
TWO-MILE RUN-1. Jewsbury (); 2.
Lynch (M); 3. Hal (M). Time: 9:22.8
SHOT PUT-. Nilsson (M);.2. Bauer
(I); 3. Pella (M). Distance: 54 feet,
10 inches (new meet record)
DISCUS-1. Nilsson (M); 2. Pella (M);
3. Twardock (I). Distance: 158 feet,
5/ inches (new meet record)
POLE VAULT - 1. Foster (1); 2.
Maugh (M) and Wright (1) tied.
Height: 13 feet
HIGH JUMP-1. Mead (M); 2. Heintz-
man (M); 3. Evans (M), Kabel (I),
and Wham (I) tied. Height: 6 feet,
84 inches (new meet, Ferry Field,
and Michigan varsity record)
BROAD JUMP-1. Floyd (I); 2. Mc-
Nulty (1); 3. Stinson (M). Distance:
22 feet, Ii/4 inches
MILE RELAY - 1. Illinois (Corley,
Maynard, Siders, and Fessenden).
2. Michigan (Scruggs, Barton, Hick-
man, Carroll) Time: 3:18.8

By JIM DYGERT.
Michigan's golf team took two
more Big Ten matches but lost
the third in a quadrangular meet
on the University course yester-
day.
The Wolverines, previously un-
beaten on the Big Ten links, bare-
ly edged Purdue. 19-17, and
trounced Michigan State, 291/-6%,
while losing a game battle to Ohio
State, 20%-15%.
* * *
EMERGING as a triple winner,
the Buckeyes also downed Purdue,
23-13, and walloped the Spartans,
Rained Out
The cancellation of yester-
day's baseball doubleheader be-
tween Michigan and Indiana at
Bloomington because of rain
practically washed away all
chances the Wolverines had of
retaining their Big Ten Crown.
The Wolverines, currently in
fourth place in the standings,
needed victories over Indiana to
return them to a contending
position.

and followed it with a 79 for a
153 total, the best for the Bucks,
Although Ohio State recorded no
sensational scores, its highest was
157, turned in by both Harper and
Thad Long. Michigan's highest
was Stanford's 80-86-166,
MICHIGAN STATE was neverj
in the running and did not post a
score below 162. Two Spartans,
Captain Carl Mosack and Bill Al-
bright accounted for Green and
White's best effort.
Michigan built up a 12-6 ad-.
vantage over Purdue on the
morning round only to see the
Boilermakers gradually catch up
as the afternoon scores came in.
With all except one match com-
pleted, Purdue had pulled into
a tie with the Maize and Blue,
161 -16%.
When the score of the final'
match was posted, it showed a
37-38-75 for Wolverine Warren
Gast's afternoon round, enabling
him to take 2% points from his
Purdue opponent, Bob Krueger.
Stumpfig, playing against Ben-
ning, carded a morning round 79
for a total of 155, but Benning's
148 enabled the Boilermaker to
gain the maximum of six points
against Michigan.
Major League
Standings

By DICK BUCK'
The Michigan tennis squad
bounded back onto the victory trail
Iyesterday in convincing fashion as
it whitewashed the Buckeyes, 9-0,
in a morning contest on the var-
sity courts.
The Wolverines lost to Michigan
State Wednesday after running
their string to. six straight. They
had no trouble at all in disposing
of Ohio State, however, winning
most of their matches by easy
scores to record their first shutout
of the season.
DAVE MILLS, playing in Michi-
gan's number three spot, returned
to the win column by downing
Herb Jones in two sets, 6-2, 6-4.
He had lost his matches in the pre-
vious two meets against Notre
Dame and MSC.
In his usual smooth form Al
Mann breezed by Keith Hanlon
in the number one singles, chalk-
ing up a lopsided 6-1, 6-1 mar-
gin.
Mann combined with Bob Cur-
han in doubles to wring out a tri-
umph over Bucks Bob Gates and
Bill Keely. The Wolverines took the
first set, 6-3, but lagged in the sec-
ond and trailed in games, 5-3. At
this point the Murphymen's steady
play rattled OSU and the Mann-
Curhan combo went on to grab a
7-5 decision in-the second set for
the match.
BOB NEDERLANDER, the only
Maize and Blue competitor to gain
a singles win against the Spartans,

continued to show his fine play
as he smashed Gates in the num-
ber six slot, 6-2, 6-0.
Ohio's Gil Miller hopped on
Pete Paulus in the first set of
their match, netting a 6-4 vic-
tory, but Paulus, always shaky
at the start settled down. He
came back to nab Miller 6-3,
and polished him off in the final
set by a 6-2 edge. -
It was Paulus against Miller
again in doubles. Paulus teamed
with Bob Paley while Miller was
paired with Jones. This too car-

ried to three sets. The Buckeyes
took the first, 6-3, but cracked
under a blistering attack which
brought Michigan 6-4, 6-1 tri-
umphs and the match.
Maury Pelto's two-handed shot
was nipping the corners in his 6-2,
6-2 singles bombardment of Ohio-
an Dick Botsch while Bob Paley
blasted George Whittaker, 6-4, 6-1.
Another one-sided win came for
the Wolverines in the number
three doubles, where Mills and Ne-
derlander trounced Botsch and
Hanlon, 6-0, 6-2.

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32%-3/2. The Boilermakers sal-
vaged some prestige by easily de-
feating Michigan State, 30-6.
Bob Benning, Purdue swinger,
walked off with medalist honors
by firing a nifty 76-72-148, to
top his closest competitor by
four strokes. Wolverine Bud
Stevens turned in a 75-77-152
to pace Coach Bert Katzenmey-
er's sextet and grab second-best
honors.
The Wolverines fell behind the
Bucks on the morning tour of their
tricky home course, trailing 11-7
after the first 18 holes. On the
first nine after lunch, Lowell Le-
Clair shot a 39, which was dupli-
cated by Buckeye Frank Guarasci.
LeClair then faltered to a last nine
40 while Guarasci was marking up
a 38 card to take 2 valuable
points from the Wolverine.
JACK STUMPFIG, playing the
number two spot for Michigan,
followed LeClair in with a pair of
38's to regain the 2% counters
from Francis Cardi, Ohio State
Amateur Champion. The remain-
ing afternoon matches were even-
ly split, with Michigan holding a
slight advantage, except for Tad
Stanford's match in which Buck-
eye Larry Harper carded a 77 to
take all three points from Stan-
ford.
Ohio State's Mel Woefling,
swinging from the third posi-
tion against Stcwens, fired a 74
in the morning to card the sec-
ond best 18 holes of the tourney

Read and Use
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AMERICANl

New York
Chicago
Boston
Cleveland
Washington
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Detroit

17
18
14 '
13
14
12
12

LEAGUE
I. Pct.
9 .654
11 .621
11 .560
11 .542
14 .500
15 .444
16 .429
21 .276

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 6, Philadelphia 3
Washington 6, St. Louis 0
Chicago 5, New York 3
Boston 1, Cleveland 0
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Washington
Cleveland at Philadelphia (2)
St. Louis at New York (2)
Detroit at Boston (2)
* *3

GB
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3
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GB
1
2'
7
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s'

NATIC

Philadelphia
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Brooklyn
New York
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Cincinnati

ONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet.
16 7 .696
15 8 .652
13 9 .591
14 10 .583
11, 15 .423
10 15 .400
7 14 .333
5 13 .278

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Philadelphia 3, Milwaukee 0
Pittsburgh 3, Chicago 2
New York 5, St. Louis 2
Brooklyn at Cincinnati (rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Milwaukee (2)
Brooklyn at Cincinnati (2)
Pittsburgh at Chicago (2)
New York at St. Louis

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