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May 12, 1953 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-05-12

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TUESDAY, MAY 12, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIMER

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PAGE THRE!

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0!57SOrtecrIPt

At,

. 4.by Ivan N. Kaye

NOW THAT SPRING FOOTBALL is a thing of the past, it might be!
enlightening to review the significant developments of the off-
season practice.'
First and foremost, the shift back to one-platoon was accom-
plished with a minimum of difficulty, with the only major position
change being the switch of Captain Dick O'Shaughnessy to right
guard to make room for Dean Ludwig at offensive center and de-
fensive linebacker.
Ludwig has a Treat future as a linebacker. He is certain, if
his performance this spring has been indicative, to be a worthy
successor in the line of great names at that position which be-
gins with Germany Schultz at the turn-of-the-century and con-
tinues up through Dan Dworsky, Dick Kempthorn and Roger Zat-
koff of our own day.
Captain O'Shaughnessy, who has been called by some "the for-
gotten man of spring football," has begun the intricate task of learn-
ing a new position. With the old master, Jack Blott, tutoring him,
the Michigan leader has shown an amazing knack for picking up, the
essentials of guard play. The zeal with which O'Shaughnessy has
plunged into his new assignment should serve as a perfect example to
the Michigan squad of just what is meant by that oft-misused term
"team spirit."
* * * *
Stress Fundamentals . .
THE COACHES STRESSED fundamentals this spring as never be-
fore. The linemen especially were put through a gruelling twenty
days of blocking and tackling practice. The coaches undoubtedly felt
that if they were going to have to start all over, they might as wellj
begin at the beginning and build from that point.
A great improvement in passing could be observed all through
the drills, and reached its greatest heights in the intra-squad game
Saturday at the Stadium. Everyone in the backfield is capable of
throwing the ball with a fair degree of accuracy, and what is just as
important, there is a talented corps of pass-catching ends to serve as
Y receivers.
Yearling quarterback Lou Baldacci of Akron, Ohio, climaxed
a five week period of steady improvement with a sparkling per-
formance in the Blue-White game on Saturday. He passes well,
runs well, calls plays with imagination, and after learning the
4 tricks of blocking from graduating Michigan quarterback Ted To-
por, who was an assistant coach for the drills, appears to have
mastered the rugged part of that position. In addition, Baldacci
fits into the defensive picture as Ludwig's teammate backing up
the line.
Duncan McDonald is blocking twice as well as he did last year,
but gives away too much weight to Baldacci to match him in that
department. McDonald is still the team's best passer, but finds it
difficult to gain a place on defense. He has been played at a half-
back position, but seems to lack the necessary speed to handle pass
receivers. A great deal of credit must be given McDonald for the im-
provement he has shown over his all-around play of last season.
, Whether this improvement has been great enough to install him as a
first-stringer is doubtful, but will be decided this autumn.
* * *
Deception Returns .,.
THE BACKFIELD has been doing a lot of fancy ball-handling this
spring. The result has been to import some of the old slight-
of-hand to the Michigan attack. Some of the plays brought memories
of the 1947 Magicians of Bob Chappuis and company. The explana-
tion for the increase in variety probably lies in the fact that Ted
Kress, Dick Balzhiser and Tony Branoff have all played together for
over a year, and are beginning to work as a unit.
Along with the increased deception has also come a greater em-
phasis on "T" formation plays. Here the major concern has been quick
opening drives which make use of the exceptional, all-round speed of
the Michigan backfield. Branoff, especially is much faster than last
year, and should really come into his own this fall. He and the ever-
t hustling guard Don Dugger were worthy recipients of the coveted
Morton Trophy.

'M' Netters
Face MSC
Tomorrow
By DICK BUCK
"The team is a lot better than
I expected but they haven't met
their toughest competition yet,"
tennis Coach Bill Murphy com-
meilted.
He was refering to the Michigan
tennis squad which has now taken
six straight dual meets without
a loss.
THE "TOUGHEST competition"
will come tomorrow as Michigan
State's powerful tennis machine
moves into town. The Spartans
have an equally favorable 8-0 rec-
Any person interested in
joining the Scimitar Club
(Fencing) is invited to attend
the new-member meeting to-
night at 7:30 in Room 3N
of the Union.
--Ed Neback
ord on the books and have piled
up more impressive margins than
the -Wolverines against teams
which both have opposed.
Michigan's schedule has been
nearly perfect this season. Start-
ing with the University of De-
troit and Western Michigan Col-
lege, comparatively weak teams,
the prowess' of the Maize and
Blue squad has improved steadily
with the caliber of the teams
it has faced.
Against Notre Dame Saturday
the Wolverines played their best
tennis thus far, defeating top
flight players such as Wally Clarke
and Ken Angyall.
* * *
THE IRISH boasted a good all-
around squad and it was Michi-
gan's first chance to really show
what it has. It controlled the sin-
gles matches with little trouble
but had difficulty in doubles, drop-
ping two of three matches.
Al Mann has now had a
chance to regain his 1952 form!
while netters such as Pete Paul-I
us and Maury Pelto have added!
to their store of meet experience.
Murphy has a young team with
largely sophomore and junior
membership. These players have
been making up for what experi-
ence they lack with "hustle."
1 -9

Cooley Nine Blanks
Adams on One Hit
Stapleton Wallops Pair of Homers
As Van Tyne Bows to Taylor, 11-3

ILLINI, BUCKEYES SECOND:
Iowa Nine Captures Big Ten Lead

By DAVE LIVINGSTON
Surprising Iowa has come from
nowhere to jump into the Big Ten
baseball lead.
Hardly considered as a poten-
tial title threat less than two
weeks ago, the Hawkeyes, who
finished ninth last year, won three
games over the weekend to give
them a 5-1 record with the con-
ference season nearly two thirds
gone. * * *

BATTING AVERAGES _

By CORKY SMITH
Norm Kiel pitched a one-hit vic-
tory yesterday as Cooley House
romped over Adams, 11-0, in resi-
dence hall intramural softball at
Ferry Field.
The lone hit came in the fifth
inning when Chuck Wood smacked
a single off the Cooley third base-
man's glove. Kiel registered four
strikeouts as he shut out the Ad-
ams squad.
JIM, EVANS led the victors in
the hitting department with a
triple and two singles. Tom Sachs
contributed a home run and a
single and Joe Uhrich banged out
two singles for Cooley.
Wenley walloped Reeves, 15-1,
in another residence hall ball-
game. Gordon Jaaskelianen,
Wenley pitcher, struck out six
men and allowed only three hits,
as his team, aided by six Reeves
errors, had a field day at bat.'
Bill Waldner hit a roundtrip-
per, and teammate Sheldon Ro-
Fence Ruling
Hurts Baseball
Crowni Hopes
ANN ARBOR -A) - There's a
cloud hanging over Michigan's
chances of winning the Big Ten
baseball title again this season.
The Wolverines are doing all
right ; nd are accorded a fair
chance of coming out on top. But
there's a fence they'll haveto
hurdle.
It's the new Western Confer-
ence rulinz calling for a fence
around ever., Big Ten ball park.
It doesn't nee. to enclose the
playing field but should mark
the limits of the outfield.
If the league wants to be tech-
nical, the coaches can sit back
and wait for the finish before act-
ing. If Michigan did manage to
win the title, a solid protest could
force the Wolverines to forfeit.

vin contributed a double and
single for Wenley House. Jack
Holth spoiled Jaaskelianen's
chance for a shutout with a
home run.
Strauss whitewashed Hayden,

.
"t

Tadian
Billings
Harrington
Haynam
Corbett
Eaddy
Howell
Sabuco
Cline
Lepley
Mogk
Leach
.Ritter
Pavichevich
Wisniewski
Yitkosky
Woschitz
Fancher

AB ' R H Pct.
2 0 1 .500
22 2 S .363
6 1 2 .333
62 12 20 .323
46 8 14'.304
66 14 19 .287
56 13 16 .285
70 9 20 .285
29 8 8 .276
67 12 18 .268
72 17 18 .250
63' 13 14 .222
15 2 3 .200
12 0 2 .167
12 1 1 .083
8 1 0 .000
3 0 0 .0&0

10-0, while Don Simon poked out THE PRESENT leaders are a
two four-baggers and Hugh Dutil long way from having the cham-
one in another slugfest yesterday. pionship sewed up, however, as at
Don Haapala was the winning least six teams remain very much
hurler. in the race for the laurels.
* * * Ohio State and Iillinois, with
BIG STICK man in Taylor's 11- identical 7-2 marks, aren't far
3 trimming of Van Tyne was Tom off the pace.
Stapleton who hit two home runs. Neither is Michigan. with a 6-3
TomBaker shared hitting honors record, but with those three big
Tom Baker shared hitting honors defeats, the Wolverinesmust stay
with two singles and a four-bag pretty steadily in the win column
smash. / from here on out if they are to re-
* * * tain the conference crown they.
IM SCORES shared with Illinois last year.
Hinsdale 8, Greene 7
Williams 9, Scott 8
Lloyd 7, Gomberg 7 (tie) MINNESOTA and Wisconsin,
TENNIS with 4-2 and 3-2 marks respective-
Delta Tau Delta 2, Sigma Phi Epsilon 1 ly, are currently buried behind the
Sigma Chi 2, Phi Kappa Sigma 1 leaders, but with only a pair of
Law Club 3, Alpha Kappa Psi 0
Phi sigma Delta 2, Theta Xi 1 games in the all-important loss
FRATERNITY GOLF column both bear consideration.
(Top Five) The Illini, and Gophers, as
1 sigma Phi Epsilon, 332 well as Iowa, came through with
2 Phi Gamma Delta, 341 three victories over the week-
3i Delta Kappa Epsilon, 345
4 Phi Sigma Delta, 346 end, while Michigan and Ohio
5 Phi Delta Theta,,3481 State each absorbed a licking
GOLF RESIDENCEIIALLS along with two triumphs.
(Top Five) Last week's pace-setters at 2-0,
1 Gomberg, 355 Wisconsin and Northwestern,
2 Allen-Rumsey, 364 didn't find things so rosy.
3 Reeves, 372 * *
4 Cooley, 376
5 Van Dyne, 393 ILLINOIS, winner of six straight

three-game' weekend series, but
still managed to suffer their third
defeat.
Sandwiched between Friday's
9-1 rout and Saturday's 20-2
second-game debacle was a 6-5
eleven-inning heartbreaker, with
Michigan on the short end of
the score.
Coach Ray Fisher's outfit should
have a little easier sailing this
coming weekend as it tours In-
diana for a non-conference game
with Notre Dame Thursday, a sin-
gle loop test at Purdue Friday, and
a double-header at Indiana Sat-
urday.
Elsewhere in the Big Ten, Illi-
nois and Ohio State square off in
a big weekend series at Columbus,
Iowa and Minnesota trade Wiscon-
sin and Northwestern as oppo-
nents, and Michigan State will
face the Hoosiers and the Boiler-
makers on alternate days with
Michigan.
MAJOR LEAGUE SCORES
Chicago 2, Cleveland 1

I
}

since Michigan trimmed them in
both ends of a twin-bill, handed
the Wildcats their first loss Fri-
day, then did the same thing to
the Badgers on Saturday, dump-
ing them twice.
Wisconsin had beaten Ohio
State on Saturday, but the
Buckeyes came back the next
day to rout Northwestern in
two games.
Iowa picked on down-trodden
Purdue and Indiana, each with
0-8 records. After clipping the
Boilermakers on Friday, the Hawk-
eyes whipped Indiana 8-3 and 1-0
Saturday behind the hurling of
Merle Jensen and Ron Schafer,
the same pair of righthanders who
jolted Michigan twice the previous
weekend.
THE WOLVERINES outscored
Michigan State 34-9 in their

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