100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 26, 1953 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SUNDAY, APRIL 26, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

WAM

AZ",

Cops

Two

Titles

in

Re lays

GOLFING BLUES:
Illinois Golf Team No Threat for Title

U

SWolverines' Four Victories
Set Record for Penn Relays

By DIANE MOWREY
The Michigan thinclads took two
more first places in yesterday's
running of the Penn Relays to
bring the total for the two-day
event up to four, for the Wolver-
ines, and garnering for them the
unofficial team championship.
40,000 spectators saw Fritz Nils-
son become a double winner and
successfully defend his shot put ti-
tle with a toss of 55 feet, 9%
inches. This distance was only
three inches off the Penn Relays
record set by former Wolverine
Charlie Fonville, and was 14 inches
more than Nilsson has ever
thrown.

Villanova capturing second, and
Michigan coming in third, about
20 yards back. For Moule, Lynch
and Ross this was their third
race of the two-day relays.
In the high jump, Michigander
Milt Mead came in third with a
leap of 6 feet, 2 inches.
* * *
VAN BRUNER of Michigan fin-
ished third in the 120-yard high
hurdles event.
Incidentally, Wolverine Roy Pel-
la was moved up from fourth to
third in Friday's discus event, as
the man who had taken third
turned out to be in the army. The
Penn Relays are only for collegiate

(Second in a Series)
By JIM DYGERT
The mark of insignificance!
brands the Illinois golf squad in
the frantic struggle for the Big'
Ten links title.
The blessing endowed by the re-
turn of five lettermen lends little
encouragement to the Illini when
they remember that last year's
congregation captured ninth place
in the Conference championships,
topping only the Spartans of
Michigan State.
* *
WITH THE memory of a golf
superiority in 1941 dimming as
each year is added to" the draught,
Illinois, under the tutorship of
Ralph Fletcher, has the aim of
producing at least an individual
standout in the '53 scramble.
Named as chief candidate for
the honor is senior Don Cassady,
number one man on the squad
that fought its way to one win
and nine losses last year. Cas-
sady, chosen captain of the
present golf group, is destined to
the number one spot again.

year ago. Reposing somewhere in
his repertoire of honors is third
place in the Milwaukee amateur
medal play tournament 'in 1950.
* * * -
LOW MAN for Illinois in the
'52 meet was Bob Marquardt, who
is returning this year to brighten
somewhat the Illini hopes. Mar-
quardt lists as the grandest ac-
complishment within the scope of
his memory a hole-in-one on a
231-yard hole.
Moving up from the number
four position, Ken West, second
best for the Illini in the '52 con-
ference meet, boasts a fifth place
in the '51 Illinois state inter-
scholastic meet. Haynes Haw-
kins, winner of a Kentucky state
amateur title, and Tom Rowa-
der complete the roster of medi-
ocre lettermen.
Who is to fill the remaining slot
on the squad depends on the out-
come of a rugged battle among

Although the second-ranking several assorted juniors and soph-
Illini golfer in the '51 Big Ten omores aspiring to bring more
meet, he faltered to third best a meaning to the phrase 'Fighting

DICK LEWIS IVAN KAYE
... associate sports editor . . . sports editor

PAUL GREENBERG
... associate sports editor

emen.Pella's mark was 155 feet, 9
new Penn Relays mark of 174 feet, inches, the second best of his ca-
3% inches in the discus. For the whole two-day event
The four-mile relay team cap- Michigan garnered four cham-
tured yesterday's other cham- pionships and 10 gold wrist-
pionship for the Maize and Blue, watches, becoming the only team
in the time of 17 minutes and 50 ever to win that many first places
seconds. Penn State,. Syracuse, in the 59 years of the Penn Relays.
and favored Villanova took sec-
ond, third, and fourth in that or-
'd off Dooley ran the first leg ichigan
for Michigan, with 18 teams start-
ing in the relay, and came intoCr
the wire in fifth place. Then (Continued from Page 1)
George Lynch took the lead at the battling back in the fourth and
half-mile mark of the second leg, scored once on a double by captain
Bruce Frazier and consecutive sin-;
ighty Heave byMax Hooper and Bobl
ghty eave Moore.

SPORTS EDITORS NAMED-Ivan Kaye was appointed as the new Daily Sports Editor last night
to succeed out-going Sports Editor Ed Whipple. At the same time Dick Lewis and Paul Greenberg
were chosen Associate Sports Editors. Kaye, from Chicago, is a history major and affiliated with
the Pi Lambda Phi fraternity. Greenberg, also a member of Pi Lambda Phi and majoring in history,
comes from New York City. He belongs to Phi Eta Sigma and Sigma Delta Chi honorary frater-
nities. Lewis, of Long Island, New York, majors in political science and is a member of Sigma Alpha
Mu and Sigma Delta Chi fraternities. Greenberg and Lewis replace Dick Sewell and John Jenks as
Associate Eidtors.

Illini'.
* * *
THIS EXPERIENCE) crew will
journey to Lafayette, Indiana, next
Saturday to encounter three of
the Big Ten's mightiest, Michigan,
Purdue, and Ohio State, all of
which are rated, along with Wis-
consin, an excellent chance of
snatching the '53 crown,
In the estimation of these three
contenders, the presence of the
Illini at the quadrangular meet
means six extra spectators, more
or less, if their contribution to the
contenders' point totals is disre-
garded.
But Coach Fletcher is hoping
that such hasty evaluation may
cause the kind of overconfidence
that often opens the door to upset.
Such optimism seems unfounded,
since the big three will be swing-
ing it out against each other.
SPO RTS
JIM DYGERT, Night Edito
KEEP A-HEAD
of YOUR HAIR!
Collegiate Cuts
to please!!
8 Stylists - No Waiting
The Daseola Barbers
Near Michigan Theater

PI due Takes Championship
In BigTen Bowling Tourney

ine Takes Two from Illini

Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Mogk drew the pass to lead off
and Billings drove one down the
right field line to score the Wol-
verine captain. Corbett led off the
sixth inning with a double to left
to set up the final tally. AfterI

Wing, rf..................2
Hester, 31)........2
Schuldt, p................ 1
*Sabalaskey................ 1
Graves, p .................. 1

0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 6

28

* Batted for Schuldt in 6th

Out in Los Angeles in a dual
Pacific Coast Conference meet
between Southern California
and the University of Califor-
nia, Trojan Parry O'Brien put
the shot 58 feet, 81/ inches yes-
terday. This is the longest toss
ever made in the United States.

I

Fortunately the rally was 'abuco fhadsacrifced hm to third,
brough to an abrupt end by some Wisniewski's grounder to deep
inept base running on the part of short chased home the winning
Hooper. Rounding second after run.
Moore's single, he became careless Illinois threatened seriously to
and was cut down trying to get get back in the game in both the
back to the bag on a perfect sixth and ninth innings, but Wis-
throw from centerfielder Frank niewski stymied its attack when
Howell. the chips were down. Lepley's
* * * catch against the left field fence
THE Wolverines put the game cut off a sure game tying homer in

R
Michigan .. 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1-6
Illinois .... 0001 00000-1

H
11
6

F
1
1

New York.........
Cleveland.........
Chicago .............
St. Louis..........
Philadelphia.......
Boston.............
Washington.........
Detroit..............
YESTERDAY'S

wI L Pet.
9 2 .818
5 . .714
6 3 .667
5 4 .556
6 5 .545
4 6 .400
2 8 .200
2 9 .182
RESULTS

GB
2
2
3
3
41:.
61 r
7

and John Moule, running third for
the Wolverines kept it.
WHEN anchor man John Ross
took over, Penn State was running
a close second, but Ross, with a
great burst of speed, won the race
by 30 yards.
In the mile-relay race which
Manhattan won in the time of
3:15.8, Michigan ran second in
3:16.5, with Morgan State third,
Oklahoma A & M fourth and
Cornell, the favorite, fifth.
The mile-relay was the last race
of the day, and Manhattan had
scratched all its entries from the
other relays to concentrate on this
one.
BILL BARTON, Dan Hickman,
and Grant Scruggs all ran under
50 seconds on their legs, while an-
chor man Jack Carroll came in
under :49. These times were all run
on a track which had been com-
pletely ghopped-up by earlier high-
school races.
Fordham took first in the two-
mile relay race in 7:44, with
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Wisconsin 5-9, Purdue 4-5
Ohio State 4-2, M.S.C. 1-1
Western Michigan 8-4, Marshall
W. Va., 7-3
Western Illinois 4-2, Illinois
Normal 2-4

on ice in the fifth inning, pushing the seventl
across two runs on two doubles
and a one base blow. After Cor- MICHIGAN
bett had blasted a double to lead Cline, rf .
off, Cline slammed the ball against Haynam, ss
the snow fence in center field, Howell, f
Eaddy, 3b
scoring Corbett and gaining a two ; Mogk, lb,.
base hit for himself. Lepley, If
Then Haynam drove out his Sab"co, 2b
Leach, c .
second single to score Cline with , Corbett, p
the fourth run. Michigan added
its final two markers in the sixth
and ninth innings respectively ILLINOIS
to annex the 6-1 victory. Feigenbutz
Illinois jumped into a two run Miller, 2b
lead in the third inning of the Frazier, c.
nightcap, when it put together an Hooper, if
infield hit, a sacrifice, a walk, a Ultes, cf .
solid single and an infield out to Moore, lb.
develop the margin. The big blow
was Jerry Miller's line single to
left to score the first run.
* * *
THE LEAD faded however, in
the middle three innings as Mich-
igan scored one in each stanza to
earn the deciding 3-2 margin.
In the fourth, Lepley walked
to lead off and after Corbett
had gone out, Sabuco laced a
double to center to chase Lep-
ley home with the first Michi-
gan run. The fifth inning tying
run also was a result of a walk
and a double.

FIRST GAME
..................
s................
b................
................
..................
...............
..................
.................

AB R
5 1
5 0
3 1
4 0
4 0
4 1
3 1
4 1
3 1
35 6
AB R
2 0
4 0
4 1
3 0
4 0
4 0

H
1
r)
0
0
1
1
2
3
11
H
0
0
Ii
0
3

SECOND GAME
MIChIIGANA
Mogk. lb ..................
IV'vnarn-ss-................
Billings, cf..............
Faddy, 3b .................
Lepley, If................
Corbett, rf..............
Sabuco, 2b..............
Leach, c................
Wisnewski, p............
ILLINOISA
Feigenbutz, ss...........
Miller, 2b................
Ultes, cf ..................
Hooper, If...............
Frazier, c................
Moore, lb .................
Haskins, rf...............
.Hester, 3b...............
Smith, p................
Ahlers, p .................

AB R
2 1
4 0
4 0
4 0
3 1
3 1
2 0
2 0
3 0
27 3
AB R
3 1
3 0
4 0
4 0
3 0
3 0
2 0
3 1
1 0
1 0
27 2

H
0
2
0
0f
1
I
0
5

New York 4, Washington 2
Boston 4, Philadelphia 3
Chicago 6, St. Louis 4
Cleveland 4, Detroit 3
TODAY'S GAMES
Washington at New York
Philadelphia at Boston (2)
Chicago at St. Louis (2)
Detroit at Cleveland (2)

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Purdue rolled up a pin total of
2638 to win the team title in the
fourth annual Big Ten Bowling
Tournament held here yesterday
at the 'Huron Lanes.
Wisconsin copped second place
with a 2546 total, while Illinois
finished right behind the ?????
with 2527.
S THE MICHIGAN keglers slid;
into the fifth spot to better by
one notch their finish in last
year's meet held at Minnesota.
In all-events individual stand-
ings Minnesota's Jerry Bright-
bill grabbed top honors with
1740, followed by Leroy Smith
of Michigan State with 1679
and Michigan's Chuck Barn-
hart with 1648.
Brightbill's 594 in singles com-'
petition also was enough to putf
him at the top in that department,
a scant te npins ahead of Wiscon-
sin's Dick Benson and 31 in front
of third place winner Phil Barad
of Michigan.
BARAD and Barnhart carried
the bulk of the load for the five-
man Michigan entry, copping sec-
ond place as a team in the doubles
competition in addition to their
high placings in the individual
standings.
A pin total of 1200 gave Mich-
igan State's Stan Kurzman and
Smith the doubles champion-

presents summer
formals with
"STAIN SHY"
-the miracle
stain resistant
fabric finish! 24.95
~WILD S~fW
State Street en the Campus

I

GOLFERS
Have fun at the
Partridge Practice Range
We furnish clubs and balls
-21 miles out Washte-
now - right on U.S. 23
for 1 mile.
OPEN EVERY DAY
10A.M.- 11 P.M.

I

ship, well ahead of Michigan's
1122 and Ohio State's 1117.
All of the Big Ten schools ex-
cept Iowa and Northwestern were
represented in the bowling ex-
travaganza which began early yes-
terday morning and continued
through most of the afternoon.
The remaining members of the
Michigan quintet of entries in-
cluded Jack Cross, Hank Kiefer,
and Ted Laitner.

H
2
1
2
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
8
E
0
1

Philadelphia........
Chicago.............
St. Louis..........
Brooklyn............
Milwaukee ..........
New York.........
Cincinnati .........
Pittsburgh..........
YESTERDAY'S

W L Pet.
7 2 .778
3 2 .600
4 3 .571
5 5 .500
4 4 .500
4 6 .400
2 4 .333
3 6 .333
RESULTS

GB
2
2
2>>
2'
3/
3}>
4

Chicago 10, St. Louis 6
New York 7, Brooklyn 5
Philadelphia 7, Pittsburgh 6
Milwaukee 8, Cincinnati 4
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Brooklyn
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia (2)
St. Louis at Chicago
Cincinnati at Milwaukee (2)

_

""

THE WILTON MODEL

Michigan .: 0 0 0 1 1 1
Illinois .... 0 0 2 0 0 0

R
0 0 0-3
0 0 0-2

H
5
8

MY QUESTION TO T HE

G-E STUDENT INFORMATION PANEL:

VAN BOVEN
Summer Formals

I

"How does your business training
program prepare a college graduate
for a career in General Electric?"
...CHARLES O. BILLINGS, Carnegie Institute of
Technology, 1954
The answer to this question, given at a student information meeting
held in July, 1952, between G-E personnel and representative college
students, is printed below. If you have a question you would like an-
swered, or seek further information about General Electric, mail your
request to College Editor, Dept. 123-2, General Electric Company,
Schenectady, New York.

CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY
America's Leading Producer of
Business and Personal Airplanes
has
OPPORTUNITI ES
for
AERONAUTICAL ELECTRICAL

MECHANICAL

ELECTRON ICS
INDUSTRIAL

CIVIL

ENGINEERS
with ideas and initiative
for
DEVELOPMENT & DESIGN
of
" Diversified line of light commercial airplanes
* Helicopters
* Military Liaison Aircraft
" Military Jet Aircraft
OPENINGS FOR RECENT GRADUATES INCLUDE:

R. J. CANNING, Business
Training Course ... General
Electric's business training
program offers the college
f;graduate the opportunity to
.build a career in the field of
accounting, finance, and
business management in one
of the most diversified com-
panies in the country.
Since its beginning in 1919, more than 3,000 students
have entered the program-one of the first training
programs in business to be offered by industry.
The program's principal objective is to develop men
well qualified in accounting and related business studies,
men who can become administrative leaders in the finan-
cial and general business activities of the Company.
Selection of men for the program is based on inter-
views, reviews of students records, and discussions with
placement directors and faculty members. Selection is
not limited solely to accounting and business administra-
tion majors. A large number of men in the program are
liberal arts graduates, engineers, and men with other
technical training.
When a man enters the program he is assigned a full-
time office position in accounting or other financial work
and enrolled in the formal evening education program.
This planned classroom work is a most important phase
of the program. The material presented is carefully se-
lected and well integrated for the development of an ade-
quate knowledge of accounting and business theory, pro-

accounting and business practices of the modern eco-
nomic enterprise, and as a supplement to the practical
experience provided by the job assignment.
In general, the program trainee is considered in train-
ing for three years during which time advancements are
made to more responsible types of accounting work. After
completing academic training the trainee's progress and
interests are re-examined. If he has demonstrated an apti-
tude for financial work he is considered for transfer to
the staff of traveling auditors or to an accounting and
financial supervisory position. From here his advance-
ment opportunities lie in financial administrative posi-
tions throughout the Company. Trainees showing an
interest and aptitude for work other than financial, such
as sales, purchasing, community relations, publicity, etc.;
are at this time considered for placement in these fields.
Today, graduates of the program hold responsible posi-
tions throughout the entire organization. Management
positions in the accounting and financial field throughout
the Company, such as Comptroller, Treasurer, finance
managers, secretaries, and others, are held in large part
by graduates of the course. Met who have transferred to
other fields after experience in financial work include
public relations executives, managers of operating divi-
sions and departments, presidents of affiliated Companies;
officials in personnel, employee relations and production
divisions, and executives in many other Company
activities.
This partial list of positions now filled by former busi-
ness training men is indicative of the career preparation
offered by the business training program, and of the
opportunities that exist for qualified men interested in

IN NO OTHER GARMENT is correctness of style more im,
portant than your formal clothes. And the ever-growing,
even-greater acceptance for the Wilton model continues
to prove that it is far ahead of- its copyists.
WHEN YOU ARE READY to buy your summer formal, may
we have the opportunity to show you the Wilton model
which is available in two cloths . . . The pure silk .
the first white dinner jacket that combines complete lux-
ury with a thoroughly practical nature . . . The all rayon
that is both light and strong, and will retain its full-

Aerodynamicists
Designers

Mathematicians
Physicists

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan