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April 02, 1953 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-04-02

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PAGE TWO.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 1953-

PAGE TWO THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 1953
________________________________________ I I

Prof. Lado
Formulates
SpeechTest
It is now possible to test lan-
guage pronunciation with a writ-
ten examination.
Prof. Robert Lado of the Univer-
sity's English Language Institute
is the originator of a unique test-
ing program in which English pro-
nunciation proficiency can be
measured by pencil and paper
tests.
THE SECRET of Prof. Lado's
test is to apply systematically the
techniques of modern linguistic
science. The testing program is the
first successful written method of
testing English pronunciation of
persons whose native language is
not English, he said.
Previous efforts to apply scien-
tific techniques to testing failed
when investigations in teaching
a second language was made at
the University of Chicago.
Researchers there, working with
$119,000 in funds from the Rocke-
feller Foundation, fell short of
their goal because they found no
effective, practical system of test-
ing oral proficiency.
The University uses Prof. Lado's
tests in a certification program.
Certificates providing documentary
evidence of one's ability to speak
the English language are awarded
to successful candidates, including
prospective students for American
universities, future English teach-
ers and persons intending to travel
in English speaking countries.
The tests consist of several
parts, includingra series of pic-
tures and words with letters
missing.
For example, the pictures de-
picting "house" and "honor" might
appear beside each other. Beneath
the illustrations "-ouse" ' and
"-onor" would appear. The sub-
ject then decides whether the miss-
ing letter, in this case "H," would
have the same sound in both
words.
The University, which is the only
American school working with the
State Department on this project,
received a $5,000 grant from the
Department for the Institute's cer-
tification program.

A WAIT IN VAIN?
100 Coeds Keep League House Vigil
* * * *

.1

s

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

By HARRY LUNN
The "early bird" adage may not
prove true for a crowd of eager
coeds who assembled in the early
hours of yesterday morning at the
Administration Bldg. to file appli-
cations for residence in Hobbs
League House next fall.
Arriving as early as 2:30 a.m.,
the coeds kept up their vigil out-
side the building's doors until a
janitor let them in at 6 a.m. By 8
a.m. nearly 100 women had as-
sembled in the lobby.
WITH ONLY nine openings
available in Hobbs House, the only
undergraduate league house serv-
ing three meals a day, coeds were
told that placement would be on a
first come-first serve basis.
"But at no time did we in-
dicate to anyone that there
was need to form a waiting line
before 8 a.m. when the office
opens," declared. Mrs. Elizabeth
A. Leslie, administrative assist-
ant in the Dean of Women's of-
fice.
As a result of yesterday's inci-
dent, placement in Hobbs House
will be held up until Dean of Wom-
en Deborah Bacon returns from a
conference in Chicago, Mrs. Leslie
said.
Dean Bacon is expected back to-
day.
THIRTY-ONE coeds, who dis-
obeyed dormitory rules by leaving
their residences before 6 a.m.,
faced a perplexing dilemma when
it came time to apply for openings
at Hobbs.
Engineers Confer
On Airplane Icing
The Conference on Airplane
Icing Information will hold its
third meeting today with sessions
at 9 a.m., 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. at the
Rackham Amphitheater.
The conference, attended by
over 140 design engineers, test en-
gineers and research engineers in
the aircraft industry and govern-
ment facilities is designed to pro-
vide current technical coverage of
icing technology.
The conference will hold its fin-
al sessions tomorrow.

-Daily-Don Campbell
COEDS CROWD ADMINISTRATION BLDG. LOBBY

* * * '*
In order to claim priority for
the vacancies, they had to ad-
mit being in line well before 6
a.m. and thus might face Wom-
en's Judiciary action.
For some of them the early trip
was futile, as enough women to fillj
the vacancies had gathered at the.
building's entrance by 3:30 a.m.
Surprised University officials
and employees found nearly 100j
coeds in the lobby playing cards, I

* * *
chatting and listening to the ra-
dio when they arrived for work at
8 a.m.
Scores of women who applied
for residence in one of the 15 other
undergraduate houses were placed
yesterday.
Asked why they went to all the
trouble to get into a league house,
and Hobbs House in particular,
several irate coeds could only re-
ply "the residence hall system
stinks."

FOGGY, FOGGY DEW:
April Showers Visit Campus

"Oh, to be in England now that
April's here!"

which is .69 per cent above nor-
1 nw ur inp t d.P'in °

Such might have been the cry mai. tiowve, sinc ystray
of slicker clad Michigan students showers originated in Oklahoma
yesterday upon hearing that Lon- the weather bureau here absolves
don, famed for its rainy climate itself of all responsibility.
has had no rain in 35 days. It always happens at elec-
I tion time," one coed was heard
ANN ARBOR has reason to com- to grumble.
plain about the habitual local This supposition was confirmed
monsoon season. According to the by the weather bureau which re-
I weather bureau the rainfall for called that it had rained both days
the month of March was 3.4 inches during last spring's all-campus
elections, but the rainfall yester-
day was 10 times greater.
ate O pinions Nevertheless, the weather bur-
a LU O pin oH S eau had a comforting prediction
concerning April showers. It
* * * should be dry and fair until Sun-
day. Those students going East
may run into more rain, though.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552'
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday.)
THURSDAY, APRIL 2. 1953
Vol. LXII, No. 12
Noices
The School of Natural Resources will
hold an honors convocation at 11 a.m.,
Thurs., Apr. 2, at Kellogg Auditorium,
for presentation of alumni awards. Re-
quest is made that instructors in other
schools excuse students of the School of
Natural Resources from their eleven
o'clock classes on that day in order that
they may attend the convocation.
Faculty, College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts. Midsemester reports are
due Fri., Apr. 3, for those students whose
standing at midsemester is "D" or "E."
Report cards have been distributed to
all departmental offices. Green cards are
provided for reporting freshmen and
sophomores and white cards for juniors
and seniors. The reports for freshmen
and sophomores should be sent to the
Academic Counselors' Office, 1210 Angell
Hall;Bthose for juniors and seniors to
the Board of Concentration Advisers'
Office, 1006 Angell Hall.
Students not registered in this Col-
legebut who elected Ls.&A.courses
should be reported to te school or
college in which they are registered.
Additional cards may ne rbtained in
1210 Angell Hall or 1006 Angell Hall.
Students, College of Engineering. The
final day for Dropping Courses Without
Record will be Fri., Apr. 3. A course
may be dropped only with the permis-
sion of the classifier after conference
with the instructor.
Students, College of Engineering. The.
final day for Removal of Incompletes
will be Fri., Apr. 3. Petitions for exten-
sion of time must be on file in the
Secretary's Office on or before Fri.,
Apr. 3.
.iune Teacher's Certificate Candidates.
The Teacher's Oath will be adminis-I
tered to all June candidates for the1
teacher's certificate on Wed. and Thurs.,
Apr. 1 and 2, in 1437 University Elemen-
tary School. This is a requirement for
the teacher's certificate.
Library Hour During Spring Recess,
From Fri., April 3, through Sat., Apr.
11, the General Library will be open
week-days from 8 a.m. to 6 p~m. The two
study halls in the building will be open
as follows: the First Floor Study Hall
will be open from 9 to 12 noon and
from 1to 4 p.m., and the Basement
Study Hal will be open from 10 to 12
noon and from 2 to 4 p.m., except on
Saturdays when they will close at
noon. The Graduate Reading Rooms will
be open from 9 a.m. to 12 noon and
from 1 to 5 p.m., except on Saturdays
when they will close at noon. Library
Science Study Hall will be open 1:30
to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, April
6 through 10, closed mornings and Sat-
urdays. There will be no Sunday ser-
vice on April 5 and 12.
The Divisional Libraries and Angell
Hall Study Hall will be closed on both
Saturdays Within the vacation period
and will be open on short schedules,
i e., 10 to 12 noon and 2 to 4 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday. Exceptions are: the
East and West Engineering Libraries
which will be open 9 a.m. to 12 noon
and 2 to 5 p.m. Monday through Fri-
dlay; Bureau of Government Library
which will be open from 9 a.m. to 12
noon and 1 to 4 p.m. daily, Monday
through Friday and closed on Satur-
day; Mathematics-Economics Library
will be open 8 to 12 Monday through
Friday; the Physics Library will be ope
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9 a.m. to
12 noon; Fine Arts Reading Room will
be open from . 1 to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday; Museums Library 1 to
4 p.m. Monday through Friday, Satur-
day 9 a.m. to 12 noon; Music Library
will be open from 10 to 12 noon and
1 to 3 p.m.; the Study Hall at Willow
Run which will be open only the regu-
lar afternoon hours 1 to 6 Monday
through Friday.
Schedules will be posted on the doors
of the Divisional Libraries and infor-
mation regarding library service during
the vacation may be obtained by tele-
phoning the Director's Office, Ext. 750.
Detroit Teaching Positions. Mr.
George Baker, Personnel Director of the
Detroit Public Schools, will be inter-
viewing qualified teaching candidates
at the BureaukofAppointments, Thurs.,
Apr. 2. Mr. Baker will hold a general
meeting of interested persons in 1025
Angell Hall, Thursday at 4 p.m. Per-
sons desiring interviews should contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-

ministration Building, telephone Uni-
versity extension 489.
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sundov issue.
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; Shorts. 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store. 122 L., Washington. )7B
1951 PLYMOUTH 4 - door Cranbrook.
Beautiful light blue. Best offer over
$1265 takes it. Excellent condition.
Ph. 2-5142. )58F
PARAKEETS - Healthy home raised
birds; also seeds & cages. Mrs. Ruffins
562 S. 7th near W. Madison. )50F
FOR SALE - Tuxedo, black. Size 40
long. Tuxedo shirt included. Like
new. Priced to sell. Room 24 Adams.
Ph. 2-4401. )59F
EVERGREENS: at wholesale.
Spreading juniper 1 2-5 ft. $2.25-$10.00
Upright Juniper, 3-5 ft.....$2.00-$5.00
Spreading Yew, 11-2 ft...$2.25-$5.00
Upright Yew, 3 ft.............. $4.50
Pyramidal Arborvitae, 5 ft.......$4.95
Mugho (dwarf) Pine, 2-5 ft. $2.95-$4.50
Blue Spruce, 2-5 ft ..............$2.00
Michael Lee of Chem. Stores. Ph. 8547.
)60F

ROOMS FOR RENT
SUITE to share with board. 520 Thomp-
son. )8D
ROOMS, roomettes and apartments, by
day or week for campus visitors. Cam-
pus rourist Homes, 518 E. William.
Phone 3-8454. .3D
ROOMS FOR MEN - Complete second
floor and bath. Ph. 2-5268. )19D
PRIVATE single room furnished. Mod-
ern bath and refrigerator facilities.
Hot plate, near campus, maid service.
tal 2-7108. )21D
3-ROOM furnished campus apartment.
Private bath, first floor. Prefer girls.
Ph. 3-8454. )22D
3-ROOM APARTMENT -Also suite of
two rooms; single room; new. Near
engineering building and U. Hospital.
Ph. 2-8697, Joe. )23D
TRANSPORTATION
TO CALIFORNIA-Riders wanted. Leav-
ing in new Chevi this week. Call
Hugh Gundel, 6943. )7T
AUTHORIZED BAGGAGE and transfer
agent, also Willow Run airport serv-
ice. A. A. Yellow and Checker Cab Co.
Ph. 3-4244. )10T
WOLVERINE HOPPERS-Special buses
to Willow Run afternoon and evening
of April 3. Tickets, window No. 9 AD.
Building Tues. - Thurs. 1-4. Reduced
rates. Return buses April 12, 7:30 on.
)12T
WANTED-Ride to Buffalo; share driv-
ing and expenses. 228 Strauss, 2-4591.
)13T
HELP WANTED

TYPEWRITERSI Portable and Standard
for rent, sale and service.
Morrill's
314 S. State St.. Phone 7177. )2B
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
WASHING - Finished work and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also-ironing separately. Free pick-up
WOLVERINE HOPPERS-Special buses
to Willow Run afternoon and evening
of April 3. Tickets, window No. 9 AD.
Building Tues. - Thurs. 1-4. Reduced
rates. Return buses April 12, 7:30 on.
)19B
APPLICATION PHOTOGRAPHS
While you wait at SNIDER STUDIO.
213 S. Main. St. )6B
TYPING, reasonable rates, accurate and
efficient. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.. )4B
WANTED TO RENT
GRADUATING COED wishes to share
her apartment or wants to move in
with someone else. Ph. 2-6966. )2X
MISCELLANEOUS
SPECIAL student faculty rates. Phone
6007 and charge your order. Monthly
specials. Gift cards mailed. Students
Periodical Agency. . )7M

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

COUNSELORS for children's camp near
Delafleld, Wisconsin. Camping expe-
rience preferred. Salary plus mainte-
nance. Write Robert Gilbert, Director,
at 1444 N. Prospect, Milwaukee, Wis-
consin. )29H
WANTED-Young men part time; good
opportunity to make money in sales
field, salary guaranteed. Apply in per-
son at 226 S. First, Holland Furnace
Co. )30H

-

HELP WANTED
DISHWASHER - Small, Fraternity, 3
meals, machine. Full board, immediate
employment. Call S. L. Brown, 3-4707.
A A PERSONNEL
1 steno, Battle Creek-$300 up
1 secretary executive-$310 up
MALE
2 Civil Engineers-open
1 machine & tool designer-$435 up
304 Municipal Court Bldg. Hours 9-5
Mon. thru Sat. Ph. 2-1221. )31H
BUSINESS SERVICES

RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & T.V.
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T.V.
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1 ?2 blocks east of East Eng.

-a

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x

Four Regent Candidates St

'

* * *

(Continued from Page 1)
ROBINSON - I vigorously op-
pose the smear tactics of injudici-
ous investigations such as those
which are presently violating prin-
ciples of academic freedom. Teach-
ers and students should be allowed
to hold any opinions and join in
political activities of any kind
which are not subversive in na-
ture or intent.
4) Do you believe that students
and professors who are members
of the Communist Party or Com-
munist-front groups should be
allowed to study or teach at the
University?
ECKERT--Only if they refrain
from advocating Communism.
HATCH-We should not tolerate
Communists in the teaching pro-
fession. On the other hand, we
have no right to bar so-called left-
ist students, who are qualified aca-
demically, from enrolling in the
University.
KENNEDY-Not if they advo-
cate Communism.
ROBINSON-Naturally I do not
believe the University should har-
bor students or teachers who open-
ly advocate the overthrow of the
United States government. How-
ever, there are already laws which
prevent this, and" any student or
teacher who remains within the
boundaries of the law and who
does not use the guise of professor-
ship to disseminate Communist
dogma should be allowed to study
or teach at the University.
5) Do you believe members of
Communist-front groups should
be able to speak on campus?
ECKERT-You seem to have a
great interest in Communists. I
do not believe such groups should
be allowed to use State property to
broadcast their propaganda.
HATCH--The University should
be able to determine which outside
speakers may appear on campus
only in a debate situation. But
complete ban on alleged subversive
speakers is certainly out of place
in an educational, community.
There" are laws to take care of
those who advocate the overthrow
of the government and they should
-be rigidly enforced. But there is
nothing illegal in a public ex-
change of ideas.
KENNEDY-No'
ROBINSON - All University-
recognized student organizations
should have the right to invite any
speaker of their choice to address
their membership. The University
should be responsible for giving
these groups facilities to hold such
meetings. There are already writ-

OTTO E. ECKERT

DR. CHARLES S. KENNEDY

Rut hven Cites
'' Progress
University President - Emeritus
Alexander G. Ruthven said yes-
terday on his 73rd birthday, that
he was "well pleased" witflnel
University's progress.
Ruthven, who retired in June
1951, said he thought higher edu-
cation an the country had reached
a greater level than ever before'
"I am very pleased that the Uni-
versity continues to lead the way,
both in teaching and research,"
he added.
Looking into the future, Presi-
dent Ruthven predicted there
were "difficult times" ahead, but
that "barring national or interna-
tional catastrophe, student enroll-
ment will far exceed what we.have
now."
jTeaching Hopefuls
To Be Interviewed
George Baker, personnel director
of Detroit public schools will in-
terview prospective teachers in a
general meeting at 4 p.m. today
in 1025 Angell Hall.
Baker will also talk to juniors
who are interested in teaching ca-
reers in Detroit schools when they
graduate.

II I t ion.

-Senior Board

Seniors.
While you're home-plan the num-
ber of announcement booklets and
folds you will need for family and
friends at commencement time.
Orders for the booklets and folds will
be taken at the administration build-
ing the full week after vacation
(April 13-17) from 10:00-4:30.
Orders will be taken this week also
-samples available for your inspec-

NOW! 44c

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:".; .:tforrsng
Robert RYAN
Anthony QUINN
7 Male Powers-Suen Bell
SHE NEVER PRETENDED
TO RE A LADY

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FINAL SHOWING

THOMAS ROBINSON
* * *
ECKERT - I think its sphere
should be better defined and stu-
dents given an opportunity to take
on definite responsibilities in cer-
tain fields.
HATCH -Student government
should play a greater role in Uni-
versity affairs than at present.
Certainly students should be con-
sulted before important decisions
are made which directly affect;
their welfare. Particularly, in such
matters, the recommendations of
the Student Legislature should be
given strong consideration. Stu-
dent responsibility in taking an ac-
STUDENT
SUPPLIES

HAZEN HATCH
tive part in University affairs is
an integral part of education.
KENNEDY-The whole subject
is now being studied and any com-
ment by me would be premature.
ROBINSON - Students should
be given a more powerful voice in
University decisions. The Student
Legislature, which represents the
largest popular segment on cam-
pus, should be encouraged to pre-
sent its views and decisions on all
student issues directly to the
Board of Regents for discussion.

80CNE
Ph. 3-5651
TOMORROW

Jean Cocteau's
Erotic Drama
"THE STRANGE ONES"
- FRIDAY!

11

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