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April 02, 1953 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1953-04-02

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0

4

EDITOR'S NOTE
See Page 4

L

as
Latest Deadline in the State

Palig.

CLOUDY, WARMER

VOL. LXIII, No. 127 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 1953

SIX PAGES

r

S

5

Regent Aspirants
Discuss Program
Eckert, Kennedy, Hatch, Robinson
Vie for Two Posts in State Election
By BARNES CONNABLE
Daily City Editor
Michigan voters go to the polls Monday to elect two Regents to sit
on the eight-member University governing body for eight years.
Although the spring campaigns traditionally have resulted in Re-
publican victories, strong Democratic opposition faces incumbent GOP
Regents Otto E. Eckert and Dr. Charles 8. Kennedy this year.
* * * *
CHALLENGERS HAZEN HATCH and Thomas Robinson have
been outspoken critics of present Board policies in one of the hottest
Regents races in recent history.
Democratic hopes are also up in view of the 10 percent gain
in votes over Republicans two years ago in spite of a GOP landslide.
Regents Eckert and Kennedy are seeking their second term on the
Board.
Regent Eckert has been general manager of the Lansing municipal
power and water works for 25 years. His running mate is head sur-
geon at Detroit Grace Hospital and serves on the staffs of six other
hospitals.
Both Democratic contenders are prominent Michigan attor-
neys and graduates of the University Law School.
Robinson practiced law in Holland for 20 years before moving to
' his present residence in Benton Harbor. A native of Marshall, Hatch
is a former member of the State Legislature's University Committee.
* * * *
THE DAILY has submitted a list of six questions to each of the
major party candidates. The questions, and their answers, follow.
1) On what platform are you running for office?.
ECKERT-To provide the best possible educational opportunities
for our young people. To see that the taxpayers' dollar and the stu-
dents' contribution provides the most for the money.
HATCH-Basically my platform is as follows:
1) Regents meetings should be open to the public and press.
2) The University Extension Service should be open to everyone,
regardless of race, color, creed or affiliation with any group or or-
ganization.
3) The University must plan now for the future instead of wait-
ing until it is over-run by a-large student population with inadequate
facilities and teaching staffs to take care of it. A long-range plan
for expansion and growth must be formulated before it is too late.
4) Education at the University must be provided as reasonably as
possible. Although there are great problems in this area, the Regents
should strive continually to keep down tuition costs so that qualified
persons may benefit from the University's opportunities regardless of
their financial backgrounds.
KENNEDY-Seven years record as-a Regent and "no politics in the
administration of University affairs."
ROBINSON-I believe that faculty, student and administration
problems should be brought closer to the people of the State than they
have been under past Boards of Regents. New ideas should be brought
into the Board via new Regents so that the University will be able to
take more of a leadership role among the nation's colleges and
universities.
* * * *
2) The State Board of Agriculture recently opened its meet-
ings to the press. Do you feel the Regents should take the same
action?
ECKERT-Ths question is now before the Board and should be
decided by the entire Board.
HATCH-I definitely favor the open door. The Regents hold the

* *

* * *

41

Re s Ask New Korean eeting

Slow Tally
Delays Final
SL Results

Russia Says
Will Support
Chinese Plan"
Soviet Indicates
UN Arms Shift
By the Associated Press
The Communists this morning1
proposed a meeting Monday in
the Panmunjom truce center to.
discuss the exchange of sick and!
wounded prisoners of war and
date for resuming Korean arm is-
tice talks.
The Reds also included in a let-
ter from their high command to
Gen. Mark Clark, copies of Coin-
munist statements "concerning a
proposal on the question of re-j
patriation of prisoners of war."
* * *
CLARK SAID yesterday "we'. e
making all preparations" for re-
newing the truce talks which were
broken off Oct. 8. He said his com-
mand "will be ready to go.'
Meanwhile Soviet Russia
broadcast in many tongues yes-
terday a pledge by Prime Min-
ister Malenkov's young govern-
ment to help fully in ending the
Korean War on terms espoused
by Red China's Chou En-lai.
The pledge was made for For-
eign Minister V. M. Molotov in a
1,000-word statement to the Soviet
news agency Tass. He backed the
views which the Chinese Commun-
ist and North Korean governments
voiced Tuesday.
And in the United Nations, the
Soviet Union made an apparent
bid yesterday to close long-stand-
ing differences on general disarm-
ament.
The disarmament action-an
involved situation still under
study by UN delegates-looked
like the first break in a seven-I
year stalemate.
Russia's Andrei Y. Vishinsky
scrapped his old-time hard words
on condemning' the West on the,
question and accepted a Western
plan calling for continued work
by the U. N. Disarmament Com-
mission.
Meanwhile, the Korean front
turned quiet yesterday after sharp,
local fights at each end of the
155-mile battle line.

Six
On

Gain Victory
First Ballot

WHILE ELECTION WORKERS

IN THE SL RACE, AND MIKE
SENIOR CLASSES.
Posts Filled
On Boards
By StudentsI
In a dragging count of election
returns for posts on the Board in
Control of Student Publications
early this morning, indications
were that Don Dugger '53 had
clinched the first spot on the board
by a wide margin of victory.
Two more posts remained un-
filled when The Daily went toj
press.
* * ,' *
SECOND IN the pack of candi-
dates was Al Green, '53, with Sue'
Popkin, '54 and Al Ternes, '54
close behind.
The count in the race for five
member-at-large Union vice-
presidencies was proceeding very
slowly with only Howard Nem-
erovski, '54E, definitely elected.
Bob Perry, '53E, was running
second with no other returns
available.
In the individual school, Union
"veep" contest, William Van't Hof
walked away with the Law School
vice-presidency over Bob Baker,
Harvey Howard and Brad Stone,
and Gerald Gleich was elected
Medical School vice-president over
Edward Reifel.
In the race for the one posi-
tion on the Board in Control of
Intercollegiate Athletics, Andy
Kaul, '55, beat out two opponents
by garnering 1,546 votes.
Steve Jelin, '55, came in second
with 1,012 tallies, and Ron Gora,
'55, trailed with 875.

Si

-Daily-Don Campbell
SORTED STACKS OF BALLOTS, FIRST RESULTS CAME THROUGH SHOWING BOB ELY FIRST
CHERER AND HOWARD NEMEROVSKI PRESIDENTS OF THE LITERARY AND ENGINEERING
* * * * * * * * *

Scherer Nemerovski New Union
Win Class Presidencies Constitution
Mike Scherer rolled up 471 votes to breeze to victory as president Gets Approval
of next year's literary college senior class, last night's election count
showed.
Janet Netzer, his only opponent, received 264 votes. The Union constitution piled up

* *

BOB GOLTEN.nosed out two opponents by a narrow margin
win vice-presidency of the class. He received 275 votes, to 232 fo
runnerup Tom Dyckman and 215 for Mort Friedman.
Secretary's post went to Betty Magyar whose 440 votes
topped Betsy Smith's 279.
-- -- And Fred Hicks swept the trea
r T urer's post with 477 votes ov
Airport ticKet Dave Goldstick's 216 tally.
dale To End HOWARD NEMEROVSKI w
~Sal iOelected president of next year'
engineering college senior cla
with a comfortable 130 votes. St
Today is the last day that sn phen Qua, other candidate for th
dents may make reservations on post, received 84 votes.
the "Willow Hoppers," Wolverine Ken Moore squeezed outa
Club sponsored buses going to Wil- 106 to 102 victory over John
low Run Airport tomorrow. Munn for vice-president of th
Buses are scheduled to leave class.
the Union at 12:30 p.m., 2:15 ;:.m., Larry Roger was elected treas
3:45 p.m., 5:15 p.m. and 6:45 p.m urer, receiving 107 votes, while hi
tomorrow. Reservations can still opponent, George Gryka, receiv
be made from 1 to 4 p.m. today, ed 87.
and tickets also can be obtained William Stemwell, Jr., was un
at time of departures of the buses. opposed for the secretary's pos
The cost for the trip one way is Lion. o
85 cents and 1.50 round trip. In other election tallies, Rober
Dombrowski, Donna Hoffman an
Dorothy Fink were elected to th
Gargoyle Sale J-Hop Committee on the fir
ballot.
The all-campus sales of Gar- Others elected to the committe
goyle will continue from 12 to 1 were Pete Davidson, Harold John
p.m. today in front of Mason Hall, son, Jay Martin, Betsey Sherre
the Union, the Law Quad and other Mary Sue Shoop and Nancy Stev
points on campus. ens.

an impressive 2,498 to 247 mar-
to gin of victory in last night's all-
'rcampus. election ballot counting.
Indications earlythis morning
were that the student bookstore
referendum would also carry de-
cisively, although tabulations were
s- far from complete.
er * * *
RATIFICATION of the new Un-
ion constitution by the male stu-
dent body climaxed 16 months of
is revision, rewriting and amending
es by Union constitution revision
he sub-committees.

By VIRGINIA VOSS
Persistent rain yesterday sent
balloting totals for spring elec-
tions down from an all-time high
first-day vote to a below record
final count of 5,998.
Representing 39 per cent of eli-
gible voters, the less than 6,000
tally is a drop of seven per cent
from last fall's record vote of
7,426.
BUT THE TWO-DAY elections
made one record. Student Legis-
lature candidate Boy Ely, '5E,
piled up 437 first place votes to
top the previous high of 431, set
in fall elections by Rajesh Gupta,
Grad.
With a total of 10 categories
of ballots to distribute, cautious
counters kept a restless Union
ballroom crowd waiting until
11:45 p.m. yesterday for first
results.
Initial quota was set at 276 for
the complex Hare System counting
and six candidates came in for
first-ballot victory. Second to be
elected was present SL vice-presi-
dent Bob Neary, '54BAd., with 383
votes.
Fred Hicks, '54, polled 374 first-
place votes to come in third in
the 31-candidate race. Remaining
first-ballot victors were three wo-
men: Maryalice Jessup, '54, with
331 votes; Ricky Gilman, '55, with
316 tallies; and Ruth Rossner, '55,
with 282 votes.
Second ballot distribution put
one more candidate, Ned Simon,
'55, on the Legislature.
. * * *
WHILE ON-LOOKERS lit fire-
crackers and the Joint Judiciary
patrol munched hamburgers dur-
ing lapses in the marathon count,
SL Race
As the Daily went to press at
2 a.m. this morning, the fol-
lowing candidates had won
election to the Student legis-
lature in this order:
Bob Ely, '55E
Bob Neary, '54
Fred Hicks, '54
Maryalice Jessup, '54
Ricky Gilman, '55N
Ruth Rossner, '55
Ned Simon, '55
Marc Jacobson, '55
Hank Berliner, '56
The following candidates
were still in the running:
Fritz Glover, '55E
Janet Netzer, '54
Lorraine Baldwin, '55
Al Strauss, Grad.
Vic Hampton, '54BAd.
Imre Zwiebel, '54E
Rosemary Rehn, '55
Keith Gordon, '55
Larry Harris, '5
Eugene McCracken, '56E
Dolores LaFond, '54Ed.
David Davidson, '54
Sue Klame, '55
Bob Chigrinsky, '55
Carol Lee Frankensteen, '55
Phil Jacobus, '55
Dick Spero, '54
still-in-the-running candidates
congratulated victors and a few
gathered to discuss the low total
count.
SL president Howard Willens
'53, blamed the 39 per cent total
principally on the low number
of candidates. Thirty-one were
in the running for 20 SL seats
and candidates contesting all

charter of the University for the'
people of Michigan. They deal
with public funds and public ques-.
tions. It is important that the
people have access to the manner
of those dealings. Obviously exec-
utive sessions on confidential mat-
ter such as faculty appointments
would be necessary under the open
meeting system. But when final ac-
tion is taken, the Regents ;hould
stand up and be counted.
KENNEDY-Personally, no. But
the whole subject is under discus-
sion by a committee of the press
and the Regents.
ROBINSON-Yes. Since the Re-
gents are elected by the people of
the State, they should have a di-
rect responsibility to the electorate.
The present Regent policy of
closedmeetings makes it impos-
Psible for the electorate to obtain
voting records of their represen-
tatives and hold them directly re-
sponsible for their actions. The
people of Michigan are entitled to
know how the Board spends tax
money, exactly what its policies
are, and each individual's voting
record on all important education-
al programs.
3.) How do you feel about curl'
rent investigations of alleged
subversion in American colleges?
v
ECKERT - Subversion should
not be tolerated anywhere. Inves-
tigating methods should be car-
ried on in such a way as not to in-

%y--'------"--

UNION-LEAGUE CONFAB:
Meetingr Discusses Coed
Student UnionPossibility
Possible elimination of the present Michigan Union and Women's
League in favor of a co-ed student building was discussed at an im-
portant campus meeting yesterday.
Sub-committees of the Union and League boards of directors
met to discuss the issue. Bill Jentes, '55L, termed the results of

S
7
i
J
1
l
x
a

a
n
ie
is-
Zis
V-
n-
si-
1-
rt
nd
he
rst
,ee
n-.
er,
!v-

Beginning work in the fall of
1951, the first major changes in
the 11 year old document were
completed a year ago when the
membership okayed three basic
amendments at a special meet-
ing held in the Union ballroom.
Victory for the bookstore pro-
posal would put the Union in a
position to ask the Board of Re-
gents to change the policy of not
allowing the University to com-
pete with Ann Arbor merchants.
. A favorable Regents decision
would mean a reversal of policy

established in 1930
versity governing
down a request to
store in the first
tion.

when the Uni-
board turned
install a book-
building addi-

the conference as highly encour-*,
aging.-

* * *

* * *
BOTH PARTIES were highly re-
ceptive to the idea of unification
as the only solution to future
problems. Discussion hinged large-
ly around which of the buildings
should be enlarged and what might
be done with the other structure.
Financial and management
problems of a unified union were
cited as the chief obstacles in
the way of the planners. t
Significantly the question of
maintaining the status quo with
a separate Union and League did
not enter the discussion.
On the other hand, the idea of
simply adding to the present Un-
ion was not presupposed as the
only answer.

PER CAPITA TA X PROPOSED:
Students May Pay for Planned Union Addition
-4/'

(EDI)TOR' NOTE: This is the third
In a series of articles concerning the
proposed addition to the Union.)
By HARLAND BRITZ
Daily Associate Editor
Money for a student activitiesI
wing for the proposed Union ex-
tension may eventually have to
come from student pocketbooks.
Neither the University nor the
Union is able to give any financial{
aid for the structure.
** *
THOUGH University officials!
haovn shon interPet in the mrh I

ing. It would have to
other sources.

come from

The Union has some funds for
construction, but it will go to-
wards financing the rear addi-
tion which will revamp and ex-
tend current Union services.
This situation has caused cer-
tain student leaders to suggest
that a tax be Igid on every stu-
dent for perhaps the next 15
years. The exact amount would
depend on the cost of the struc-.
+,-r hn+ +ip fmr m l nrn-

the project out. When the Union
was originally built, one million
dollars was raised from an alum-
ni drive. However, this is still on-
ly speculation.
As far as the one and three-
quarter million addition and re-
vamping of current Union serv-
ices is concerned, the Union
now has $600,000 available, the
money coming from three ac-
counts. These accounts are lab-
eled for replacement of furni-
. ture and fixtures, major build-
:-n ran :-re aA nay hnl m.

for the additional $1,150,000. No
plans have yet been made as to
the procedure for doing this. The
$1,750,000 estimate for the service
wing was made three years ago,
and according to Union General
Manager Frank Kuenzel, costs
have since risen somewhat.
(Next-A Coed Union?)
New Cabinet
Post Official

World News
Round up
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The House
yesterday overwhelmingly approv-
ed a bill giving coastal states clear
title to tidelands beneath the sea.
WASHINGTON-Gen. James A.
Van Fleet testified yesterday he
could have destroyed the Red
armies in Korea two years ago.
LE HAVRE, France - West
German Chancellor Konrad Ade-
nauer is on his way to Wash-
ington and long-heralded con-
ferences with President Eisen-
hower and American leadcvs.

I,

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