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March 28, 1953 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1953-03-28

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY", MARCH 28, 1953

________________________________________________________________________________ I

SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 1953

WHAT MAKES MICHAEL RUN?

Faber Sprints Through Year at 'U'

NAMED TO STUDY GROUP:
Haber Predicts Conflict
On Annual Wage Issue

CLASSIFIEDS

'4

' *

* *

By GAYLE GREENE I
Although his exuberant sprint-
ing recently brought Britisher
Mike Faber, brad., into uncom-
fortably close contact with a ce-
ment wall, resulting in several
stitches on his chin, Faber has al-
lowed no let up in one year virtual
run of the University.
Half the ground he has covered
on campus since his arrival in
September on a Ford Foundation
research grant in economics has
been at a trot, run or all out gal-
lop.
IT WAS JUST such spurts of
activity that highlighted a pro-
gram of philosophy, economics,
and politics at Magdelen College,
Oxford where he graduated with a
"First" (equal to our highest hon-
ors). Faber found time to excel in
"games" there and in his younger
days captained the football team
at Eton.
Faber's life has not been with-
out disappointments, however.
An unsuccessful attempt to
swim the Bosphorus was follow-
ed by a try at the English Chan-
nel. "After rather a brave at-
tempt, they pulled me out ex-
hausted, only 150 yards from the
shores of England, Faber re-
lated,
"By the way," he added "you
needn't mention I started from
England."
Faber then suggested that a few
things he agreed upon before com-
mencing his interview. "First of all,
he requested, "no glamourizing,
because I don't like glamour. Well
I rd likr clmiir R tnn rt _

-Daily-Don Campbell

MICHAEL FABER
philosophy between verses of an old English ballad

* * *
ourizing and let's stick to the
facts, as far as possible."
He then went on to say that
he was born in London almost 24
years ago and has no birthmarks.
"' "at

> * * *
mused. "What have I done? What
had Keats done at 24? Well we live
longer these days," he assured him-
self, jumping up, hurdling a chair
and singing snatches of an old
English ballad.

Sau e gamour. But no glam- ' TVENTY-FOUR years oldhe' e
Between choruses he describ-
.... :.::.:.:.::.: :..:.:...:..::::r:::::: .::: ed those 24 years. Three of the
early war years were spent in
the States and recently he has
44c til 5 P.M spent much time on continental
Today 65c ofter 5 Europe often while participating
TotdayE in cricket and football match
schedules.
Two months were consumed
t "thinking" at a Greek monastary.
"I like monastaries" was his only
comment on this period but he did
says add that a bright red beard pro-
She fought for the NEW YORK MIRROR duced at the time contrasted well
0Wer to Stay on top with his blond hair and was com-
and almost monly known as the "oriflamme."
* * *
lost the priVilege HE EXPRESSES his interests in
r oIffolk music, modern poetry and the
theater by meeting with a play
SrA WI reading group and a guitar play-
ing group (which has entertained
at University hospital and the Arts
Theater Club) and arranging and
N 44c
ENDING TODAY
. ' 'THE BAD AND BEAUTIFUL"
- also -
"THE CLOWN"
SUNDAY
Sterling9-
HAYDEN
wpm NATALIE WOOD - WARNER ANDERSON 4
MINOR WATSON - JUNE TRAVIS. TE
A 20,h CENTURYAOX REEASE
Extra - PETE SMITH'S "DOG THAT CRIED WOLF"
"I Love Children But" Color Cartoon "THE HO UR F13'
:M:: "1r:":.:.:.":r::::"Peter Lawford
1

6e * * *
moderating the International
Roundtable on WUOM. He is also
with the Student Legislature Re-
organization committee.
"Mike may seem to be moving
in three directions at once, oc-
casionally," but according to his
roommate, Bill McIntyre, Grad.,
what seems impulsive is always
thought out. One reason he
thinks so fast may be that
his education has emphasized
thought rather than the mere
gathering of facts, McIntyre ex-
plained, while Faber ruffled
some letters on a erratically clut-
tered desk.
The room's complete disarray
combined with a dusty yuletide
centerpiece on the mantel indi-
cated that Faber has escaped un-
scathed from the discipline af-
forded by two years of military
service prior to entering Oxford.
* *' *
FABER'S PLANS for the future
are rather vague but center, for
the immediate future, on travel.
"I want to get around the world
before June 1954," he said.
Why June 1954?
S"There's a cricket match in
Scotland, I want to play in," he
explained, shifting to the chair
at the head of the table declar-
ing: "Structure is everything."
"Hey, don't write that down,"
he asked. "Everything that's said
depends on the atmosphere and
context in which it is spoken. One
might say people take life too ser-
iously and a few minutes later one
might say as Chesterton did: "To
enjoy life is to take it seriously'
and that's true, too," he explained.
"He never waters his plant" in-
terjected his roommate. "I always
have to do it for him."
"Just say I'm a great believer
in Robert Louis Stevenson's Great
Theorem of the Livableness of
Life," Faber shouted as he sprint-
ed off to class.

By HARRY LUNN
Terming the guaranteed annual
wage question a "very complex is-
sue," Prof. William Haber of the
economics department predicted
that it is very likely to become the
next major area of controversy in
labor management relations.
Along with nine other leading in-
dustrial relations experts, Prof.
Haber was named this week by
UAW-CIO president Walter Reu-
ther to a special advisory panel
which will consider the annual
wage problem.
SPONSORED by Reuther, the
guaranteed wage plan was unani-
'U' Students
Donate Little
To Red Cross
With the American Red Cross's
annual fund raising drive, "Ans-
wer the Call," scheduled to end in
Washtenaw County in three days,
student response is lagging far be-
hind expectations, according to
Mrs. Jesse A. Coller, county fund
chairman.
This year's student goal, cut
from $1,000 to $550 to better en-
able the student body to reach its
quota, apparently aroused little
incentive in the student body Mrs.
Coller reported.
Thus far contributions have
amounted to only $186.28 with
the drive nearly over, she said.
This year letters to housing unit
presidents requesting their aid in
soliciting funds replaced the tra-
ditional cannisters, with little ap-
parent success. Only three men's
resident halls, one women's resi-
dence, one fraternity and one sor-
ority responded to the campaign.
The Interfraternity Council is
scheduled to pick up contribution
envelopes from the individual
houses Monday and Tuesday Mrs.
Coller added.
Need to Relax?
Enjoy yourself
playing
PING PONG
at the
Michigan Union

mously adopted at the UAW con-
vention Wednesday as the goal for
1955 contract talks, when present
five-year escalator agreements ex-
pire.
The UAW president has called
the annual wage "a matter of
economic necessity in order to
maintain full production and
full employment, and avoid a
disastrous depression."
Commenting on the guaranteed
wage question, Prof. Haber point-
ed out that the capacity of any in-
dustry to develop such a plan will
depend on the stability of its
markets and the regularity of its
employment.
"The extent to which a commit-
ment to pay wages on an annual
basis would provide additional in-
centive toward production and em-
ployment stabilization would also
vary among plants and industries,"
he added.
AMONG the many difficult prob-
lems which must be resolved be-
fore any annual wage plan will be
practicable are the relationship of
such a plan to unemployment in-
surance laws and the extent to
which temporary or low seniority
employees would be included, the
labor relations authority indicated.
"Basically the capacity of an
industry to pay wages on an an-
nual basis depends on its ability
to stabilize its production," he
concluded.
"It would be very pleasant to
think that the last dozen years of
full employment would continue
indefinitely, but no law has yet
been passed repealing the business
cycle," he added wryly.
SL Cinema Guild
"Mr. Deeds Goes To Town,"
starring Gary Cooper, will con-
tinue at 7 and 9 p.m. today and at
8 p.m. tomorrow at the Architec-
ture Auditorium under the auspices
of the Student Legislature Cinema
Guild.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily. except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; Shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store. 122 E. Washington. )7B
PARAKEETS - Healthy home raised
birds; also seeds & cages. Mrs. Ruffins
562 S. 7th. )50F
FOR SALE-Men's Schwinn bike. Ex-
cellent. Call Jim 2-4004. )55F
1951 PLYMOUTH 4-dr.; 18,000 miles,
excellent condition. Ph. 2-5142. )56F
ROOMS FOR RENT
SUITE to share with board. 520 Thomp-
son. )8D
ROOMS, roomettes and apartments, by
day or week for campus visitors. Cam-
pus rourist Homes, 518 E. William.
Phone 3-8454. )3D
ROOMS FOR MEN - Complete second
floor and bath. Ph. 2-5268. } 19D
PRIVATE single room furnished. Mod-
ern bath and refrigerator facilities.
Hot plate, near campus, maid service.
Call 2-7108. )21D
FOR MEN-Why not move before vaca-
tion to quiet surroundings? Have 2
unusually nice bedrooms, connecting
bath. Faculty members home. Will
rent through summer and also next
year. Phone mornings or evenings,
2-5152. )20DM
PERSONAL
GIRLS Interested in a Simmon's tour
to Europe June 26 - Sept. 1. Reason-
able rates. Call Kemp 2-3225. )11P
TRANSPORTATION
TO CALIFORNIA-Riders wanted. Leav-
ing in new Chevi this week. Call
Hugh Gundel, 6943. )7r
WANTED-Driver to Washington State,
reimbursement car expenses, new
Plymouth station wagon. Daytime
call 2-4561, night 2-4019 )9T

HELP WANTED
DISHWASHER - Small Fraternity, 3
meals, machine. Full board, immediate
employment. Call S. L. Brown, 3-4707.
BUSINESS SERVICES
RADIO SERVI.CE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & T.V.
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T.V,
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1?? blocks east of East Eng. )1B
TYPEWRITERSI Portable and Standard
for rent, sale and service.
Morrill's
314 S. State St., Phone 7177. )2B
WASHING - Finished work and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
EXPERT TYPIST - Rates reasonable.
Prompt service. 914 Mary Street.
3-4449. )8B
GOOD rental typewriters available at
reasonable rates. Office Equipment
Company, 215 E. Liberty. Ph. 2-1213.
)4B
ALTERATIONS on ladies' garments.
Prompt service. 2-2678. 510 Catherine.
) 18B
WANTED TO RENT
QUIET ROOM near campus for non-
resident male graduate student April
1 to 18. Write E. Erdelyi, c/o 1104 Pros-
pect St., Ann Arbor. )iX

tkj

READ
AND
USE
DAILY
CLASS IFIEDS

I

I

Y

I

FINAL PERFORMANCE .
"RIGHT YOU ARE
IF YOU THINK YOU ARE"
"Pure enjoyment, satire, and excitement"-N.Y. Times
8:00 P.M.
1.20-90c-60c Box Office open 10 A.M. to 8 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

5e

em

Area Representative
CAROL COLLINS
ON CAMPUS TUESDAY
MARCH 31
10 A.M. to 4:30 P.M.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE LOBBY
Space available on Travel and
Study tours in Europe, Latin Amer-
ica and Africa for students. Motor
tours and bike tours; fold-boat and
camel caravans.

'

TODAY
44c until 5 P.M.

I

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LATE SHOW
TONIGHT
AT 11 P.M.

!l

I

I

I

CANCER BENEFIT CANCER BENEFIT-CANCER BENEFIT

4,

I
,r

-A-HUE U U

0

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