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March 21, 1953 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FOV1~ SATURDAY, MARCH ~1, 19~3

International
Mundanities
By The Associated Press
DURBAN, South Africa-A Dur-
ban voter being questioned in a
pre-election canvass yesterda$' pro-
posed "this man Eisenhower every-
one has been talking about" as a
candidate for the South African
Parliament.
He was somewhat surprised to
learn that "this man Eisenhower",
Is busy just now as President of
the United States.
* * *
LIMOUSIN, France - Leonce
Chabernaud, a wine merchant in
South-Central France, was buried
yesterday in a 2,600-gallon stone
wine cask he had built especially
for the purpose in 1930.
The strange tomb, empty un-
til yesterday, has been a tourist
attraction for 23 years.
Guests at the funeral following
Chabernaud's last wishes, left the
cemetery to crowd into cafes and
drink a last toast of wine to him.
GOSLAR, Germany-A fir tree,
rooted in West, Germany, fell
across the Soviet Zone border re-
cently. No iminor matter, it re-.
sulted in East-West negotiations
on the question: Who owns the
tree?
Yesterday, eight West German
frontier guards and eight Com-
munist policemen, all armed,
lined up at the fallen tree. One
Communist and one West Ger-
man sawed the tree exactly along
the border.
The Communists lugged off
the top half, thie West Germans
took away the bottom.
Read Daily Classifieds
N EW SCRE E N
NEW SOUND
N EW PROJECTORS
Cine-nSL quild
TON IG HT and
T omorrow
Night
2/4

CHERCHEZ LA FEMME!
Ann Arbor Police Hunt for Female

4>

By JOEL BERGER
Wanted: one woman.,.
This is the plea of Ann Arbor
Police Chief Casper M. Enkemann,
who desperately seeks a policewo-
man to augment his regular staff.
Fot over a year, there has only
been one policewoman on the
force, and another is needed to
help in juvenile cases and for
searching women prisoners, ac-
The police have encountered
much trouble during their search.
Most of this is due to the low sal-
ary which the position pays, about
,$2,760 annually, $1,000 below a
~patrolman's salary. This may be
raised eventually, Enkemann said.
"The four or five women Who
have applied have been scared
away by the salary," Enkemann
maintained. "They have come in,
looked at the salary, and left."
* * *
ANOTHER drawback is the lack
of space to accommodate women
on the force. Enkemnann stated the
police have asked for use of the
city hall basement, but haven't
gotten it so far. The one police-
woman now employed has to work
out of the detective bureau office.
The few applicants for the
job have been about 30 years
old, Enkemann said. The police
commissioners prefer an appli-
cant to be between 21 and 3
years of age.
Enkemann pointed out that a
few years of college education is
almost mandatory. However, he
will hire any woman who's had a
fairly good education. "An under-
standing of the problems of juve-
niles would help, too," Enkemann
added.
In Ypsilanti, a clerk in the li-
cense bureau searches women pri-
soners during the day. After she
leaves at 5 p.m., however, women
are taken to the county jail in
Ann Arbor for searching by the
matron.
sAT. ONLY
Continuous
fo sm 11 AM.
1 P.M.) Thog
-- - - - - -- ou
A New Aeluieveanent in M
& neWakD

- S
--Daily-Betsy smi
VIE (EEKEN.
V.. -r
Ils ~~A.N LO S
Mea supureemnsofpoogah adte riin f
goermeta srvceprsnnl il hghigtth Uivrstys el-
vision tchdul toa n tmro
~rs___ . Evly R.Zeko heUivriy' rndRpisxenin
Mevc et ldscue elements of photography an thetraning o
Our World" at 1 p.m. today over WOOD-TV.
1 * * *
LATER TODAY, Prof. Ferrel Heady, assistant director of the Uni-
versity's Institute of Public Administration and John H. Huss, director
of the Mchigan Municipal League, will discuss the Institute's training
of persons for government service on "Michigan Report" at 6 p.m.
on WWJ-TV. They will also explain the work of a similar institute
at the University of the Philippines.
A sculptor's change from realistic work in clay to abstract
models in steel will be considered on the University Television
Hour at 1 p.m. tomorrow to be broadcast over WWJ-TV.
Prof. Thomas F. McClure will explain some examples of his
clay figures as well as the mechanical process of using shears and
a welder's torch in steel sculpture,
~~~ ~Matnee S w e
Today 74c
Tonight and On Atomic Eneroy
- - - , Sunday 1.00 O

Sabbatical
Announced
By Regents
(Continued from Page 1)
tion Fund, Flint, for the Mott Lec-
ture Fund and $5,000 from an
anonymous donordfor a medicine
Uion Opera proceeds in Lan-
sing resulted in the Regents ac-
ceptance of $2,450 from the Lan-
sing alumni club for the Lansing
University of Michigan Scholar-
ship Fund. The club also gave
$400 for a Union Opera Assistance
Fund.
The Detroit Edison Company
gave the Regents $2,000 for ten
scholarships from areas served by
the company. The awards, for the
1953-54 school year, will be based
on scholastic ability, character
and personality, citizenship and
extra-curricularaactivity,ciserious-
Other gifts included $100 from
the University Gilbert and Sulli-
van Society for a Gilbert anid Suli-
van Scholarship Fund for society
members needing financial as-
sistance.
* * *
GIVEN sabbatical leaves for
all or part of the 1953-54 school
year by the Regents were Pro-
fessors Albert H. Marckwartad
department, George H. Forsyth, of
fine arts, and Wilfred Kaplan,
Arthur H. Copeland and Maxwell
0. Reade of the mathematics de-
partment.
Continuing the list are Pro-
fessors E. William Heinrich of
mineralogy, Arthur W. Burks of
philosophy, Wayne E. Hazen of
physics and Lawrence B. Kiddle
and Enrique Anderson Imbert of
the Spanish department.
Others given leaves were Pro-

MONDAY CONCERT:
Arthur Fiedler T o Lead
Bos ton Pops Orchestra
P'

Ann Arbor fire chief, Ben Zahn
will follow the example of his
counterparts in Boston, New York,
and San Francisco by making Ar-
thur Fiedler an honorary' fire
chief in a short ceremony before
Monday night's concert.
Arthur Fiedler who is an avid
fire follower h as his own car equip-

ped with a short wave radio and a
siren so that he won't miss out on
any fires. * * *
HOWEVER, Monday night he
will leave fire fighting to the pro-
fessionals and will conduct the
Boston Pops Tour Orchestra in
the last concert of the Choral Un-
ion Extra Concert Series at 8:30
in Hill Auditorium.
The program of light classi-
cal music includes Thomas' Ov-
erture to "Mignon," Chabrier's
"Espana" Rhapsody, Ravel's
"Bolero," Leroy Anderson's "Fid-
die-Faddle," and Strauss' "Bahn
Frei Galop, Op. 45."
Tickets for the concert will be
on sale in the offices of the Uni-
versity Musical Society from 9 to
11:45 am. today and Monday and
from 1 to 4:45 p.m. Monday.
To Convene Here
The 11th annual Southeastern
IMichigan Guidance Conference
will meet tomorrow to discuss the
newest techniques and methods of
antdRaids Director ofPupil
Personnel, Douglas D. Blocksma,
will1address the opening session on
"Some Forces Behind Vocational
Level and Choice."

'U' To Be Host
To Engineers
At Convocation
The University has been chosen
as the site for a week-long inter-
national meeting of the Amnerican
Institute of Chemical Engineers.
Experts from all over the world
will take part in the conivocation
which plans to meet here the-week
of June 20-24, 1954. Prof. D. L.
Katz, head of the University's
Cmentis chairman of the tech-
nical program which will explore
the chemical engineering aspects
of nuclear processes.
Dean George G. Brown of the
College of Engineering is a mem-
ber of the Institute Committee
on Nuclear Energy, which is plan-
ning the meeting, under the chair-
manship of Prof. Donald L. Katz.
Old Jade Exhibit
To Be Displayed
A loan exhibition of 144 exam-
ples of early Chinese jades will
open tomorrow afternoon at the
Alumni Memorial Hall and will
continue through April 22.
Prof; Max Loehr of the fine arts
department assembled the items
from nearly ten different museums
and has compiled a 34 page illus-
trated catalog.
This is the second major exhi-
bition of oriental art to be ex-
hibited in these galleries this year.

.9

wecinesdayJ
*Ion Picture Entertahament!
isne~s
~ U'hA~T

1'IAi~K EAt
TECHNICOLOR
yright Walt Oisay Producticos * lust, b~stod by IKO Rad o P ctu es Inc. ~
~ ~td AN~HEI~ GREAT T~I UMPH1
SEAR COUNTRYS~
A flW[4I~ ADVUflJRE ~)W~i9t ~ii.y ~
-- - - - - - - - - --

Dean Ralph A. Sawyer of the
School of Graduate Studies .will
talk on "Atomic Energy: Its In-
dustrial and Social Aspects" at
the final Evening of Science meet-
in anch of the Dtroit Pbi
Library.
Hisr t alk will be pesented in co
Phoenix Project, which is dedi-
cated to the development of peace-
time uses of atomic energy.
DELICIOUS
Hamburgers
ad
CH EESEBURGERS
B EE R - W IN E
TV - SHUFFLEBOARD
Dinners
4:30 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.
ZIEGSERS
Restaurant
1 20 West Liberty
CLOSED MONDAYS
ENDING TODAY
SUNDAY!
Innocent or Guilty!

fessors Ralph W. Hammett of the
architecture school, James E. Dun-
lap of classical studies Max L.
Hutt and E. Lowell Kelly of psy-
cholgy Anton J. Jobi of the
French department and William
G. Merhab of modern languages.
Fred G. Walcott, Glenn M. Win--
go and Byron 0. Hughes of the
education school, William B. Pal-
mer of economics, Hide Shorara of
Japanese, Alfred M. Elliott of
zoology, Charles N. Davissoxi and
Leo A. Schmidt of the business
administration schiool and Winton
H. Beaven of the speech depart-
ment were also given leaves.
S * *
REGENTS approval of a con-
tract was given for the University
Bands to make at least one record
alubum during the year with the
RCA-Victor Company.
TODAY!
44c until 5 P.M.
65c after 5

ARTHUR FIEDLER
. . . plays a siren too
Fight Planned
On Trichinosis
A group of 12 representatives
of medical, veterinary and public
healthn grops, met yes terday a
against trichinosis.
The group, the Continuing Comn-
mittee of the National Conference
on Trichinosis, discussed plans for
a second national conference to be
held in the spring of 1954 at Chi-
cago or Ann Arbor.
Dr. S. E. Gould, Chief Patho-
logist at Wayne County General
Hospital and a University research
associate was elected chairman of
the group; Prof. A. D. Moore of
the engineering college was elected
vice-chairman.
Rotary To Meet
F o r t y Rotary International
clubs from Michigan and Ontario
will hold a district conference to-
morrow and Monday at the Union.
Following an afternoon recep-
tion of the district governor, Alan
P. Brander of Ontario, University
Vice-President Wilbur K. Pier-
pont and Dean Willard Olson of
the education school will address
the assembly.

LD$'Ph CINEM-

Today

1 30 P.M.

''Droll, dry, witty, wonderful!
--N. Y. Post
"'Expertly fashioned! Biting, witty
dialogue!
-N. Y. Times
''S0 hilarious in spots that many of
the silken lines are lost!"
-Herald Trib.r
OSCAR WILDE'S
CQOr by TECHNICOL OR
A) ARThUR RANK ORGANIZATION PRESENTATIO a

1,'

I

3* 1

(

A wonderful story *.aI' hs
~ of how an amateur ' ~ ~ 'Singin' in the Rai
photographer got ......... ** sweethearts
his girl's picturenth rbg n W
I on the cover ofihi i e
LOOK i--
Magazine!ms~l
I6
M.- EICTUERSTRRIN
DO NII fl 'PONIMOD *BrnniERRVElI 11

*1

"A gay, urbane, and brilliantly
funny comedy"-N.Y. Times
Extra!
Walt Disney's
"HISTORY OF AVIATION"
Added
DONALD DUCK CARTOON
Both i Technicolor
TONIH T

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