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March 21, 1953 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-21

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SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 1953

FIE MICHIGAN DATLY

PAGE TTIGE

TITFI MT +rIstas A N l1 am,/1~l~ rlfw

i A-AA= liliMili7

l~

6 Jill'

Tracksters

Star

in

Meets

Ross, Mile Relay Team Set
Marks in Canadian Nationals
Hickman, Van Bruner Take Third Places
In Knights of Columbus Meet at Cleveland

* * *

Five Wolverine Wrestlers
To Vie for National Honors

Special To The Daily
Michigan's Canadian cindermen
put on a flashing display of speed
last night to set two new Cana-
dian records while winning five
events at the Canadian National
track championships in Montreal.
Meanwhile, at the Knights of
Columbus meet in Cleveland, two
of Michigan's three entries copped
thirds in their respective events.
* * *
JOHN ROSS, conference mile
champ, became the first Wolver-
ine winner at Montreal when he
JOHN ROSS
. sets another record
* * *
set a new Canadian native record
for the mile in 4:17.1. Ross out-
lasted John Alexander of Notre
Dame for an easy triumph.
Captain Jack Carroll led the
Wolverines to a new record in
the mile relay, breaking the old
record by four seconds. Dash-
man Ross Coates put the Wol-
verines out in front on the first
lap and miler Ross opened the
margin to ten yards on the sec.
ond lap.
After Al Rankin had widened
J the lead on the third trip, Carroll
took over and finished half a lap
ahead of the closest contender.

TOYING with the field, George
Lynch easily won the two-mile in
the slow time of 9:53, showing his
heels to the Swedish two-mile.
champion, Fred Gumpel.
Running easily and looking
good, promising freshman Ron
Wallingford captured the jun-
ior mile in 4:26.8. In the 1,000-
yard event, Geoff Dooley out-
kicked the field to break the tape
ahead of Notre Dame's Alexan-
der.
Despite a strong sprint in the
stretch, Carroll just failed to
catch George Rhoden, Olympic
400-meter titlist, in the 500-yard
run. Freshman Pete Sutton fin-
ished third behind Carroll.
IN THE 50-YARD dash, Coates
finished half a stride behind Olym-
pic 200-meter champion Andy
Stanfield, with Sutton running
third. Rhoden could do no better
than fourth in the dash.
Freshman Ross Macnab ran a
close second in the 500-yard
junior event and Rankin placed
second in the 50-yard high hur-
dles.
At the Knights of Columbus
meet, Van Bruner finished behind
Harrison Dillard, who won his
eighth straight meet 45-yard high
hurdles championship, and Joe
McNulty of Illinois. Dillard's time
of 5.5 seconds was only one-tenth
of a second off the world's rec-
ord.
Wolverine Bill Hickman took
third place in the 1,000-yard run
behind Ted Wheeler of Iowa and
former Illinois star Lawton Lamb.
In the high-jump, lanky defend-
ing titleholder Milt Mead failed
to place in his first meet of the
season, dropping out at six feet,
two inches.
Lenny Truex, former Ohio State
runner, nipped FBI fleetfoot Fred
Wilt in the mile run. Mal Whit-
field, two-time Olympic 800-me-
ter champ, beat Jamaica's Herb
McKenley by four yards in 600-
yard race. In the two-mile, Hor-
ace Ashenfelter won as expected.

JACK CARROLL
... sparks relay team
Sexton Gains
Prep Class 'A'
Cage Finals
EAST LANSING - AP) - Poised
and powerful, Lansing Sexton
poured in eight straight points at
the start of the fourth quarter last
night to defeat Highland Park, the
defending Class A champion, 55-
53, and move into the finals of
the state high school basketball
tournament.
* * *
DEARBORN Fordson warmed
up after a cold start to win the
opening Class A tilt from Grand
Rapids South by 53-46.
St. Joseph ran away from
Inkster to win 60-46 in the
Class B opener of the semi
finals.
The Bears from southwestern
Michigan looked classier than
their 22-8 record would indicate
and had little trouble handling
Inkster which went into the tour-
ney with a 20-1 record.
* * *
OTHER SCORES
Muskegon St. Mary 58, Esca-
. naba St. Joseph 51
Saginaw St. Marys 65, Hart-
ford 62
Muskegon St. Joseph 66, Ells-
worth 51
Detroit All Saints 54, Beal
City 48

Wolverine wrestlers, with the
Big Ten Championship trophy
safely entrenched in Ann Arbor,
are turning their sights toward the
National Collegiate tournament.
Coach Cliff Keen plans to send
five men, all of whom placed third
or higher in the conference meet,
to the NCAA affair which will be
held next weekend at Penn State.
* * *
TWO OF THE Maize and Blue
hopefuls, 130-pound Snip Nalan
and 157-pound Miles Lee, tried
their luck in the national compe-
tition last year, with Lee com-
ing through to capture the third
spot in his weight class.
Lee also placed third in the
recent Big Ten meet, while both
Nalan and 177-pound Dick
O'Shaughnessy gained confer-
ence title laurels for the second
straight year.
Michigan's other entries to the
NCAA festivities, Andy Kaul and
Joe Scandura, each took runner-
up honors in the Big Ten at 137
and 147 pounds, respectively.
* * *
SOPHOMORE Kaul could get a
chance at Penn State to take on
his old rival, Pete Compton of
Illinois. In their initial clash this
year the Wolverine dealt Compton
the first dual meet defeat of his
career, but in the showdown for
the Big Ten title Compton took
an 8-3 decision from Kaul. The
National Collegiate tourney would
be a fitting place for the rubber
match.
As a team the Wolverines will
have to whip the best in the nation
to add the NCAA trophy to the
nichenbeside their conference
momento.
Oklahoma, Oklahoma A&M,
Sports Briefs
SYDNEY, Australia - (AW) - The
Amateur Athletic Union of the
United States has refused permis-
sion for the Olympic 100-meter
swimming champion, Clark Scholes
of Highland Park, Mich., to visit
Australia in April.
Scholes, a former Michigan
State College swimmer, now is
in New Zealand. He had been
invited to swim against the Aus-
tralian champion, Jon Henricks.
The Australian Swimming Union
today received a cable from the
AAU saying that Scholes is ex-
pected to compete in the United
States championships, April 24.
S * *
NEW YORK - (/) - Hard-hit-
ting. Johnny Bratton of Chicago
came from behind tonight to
knock out Bobby Jones of Oak-!
land, Calif., in 2:52 of the fifth
round of a nationally televised
bout at Madison Square Garden.
Bratton weighed 149 to Jones 152.

and Penn State all bost powerful
mat aggregations, as do numerous
other colleges who will be bat-
tling for the title next Friday
and Saturday.
Rupp Named
In Gambling
.Scandal Suit
LEXINGTON, Ky. -- (Y) - A
Federal Court lawsuit asking
triple damages of more than half
a million dollars for alleged gam-
bling losses Friday named as
codefendants University of Ken-
tucky basketball Coach Adolph
Rupp, gambler Frank Costello and
Ed Curd, reputed former Lexing-
ton bookmaker.
Rupp, Kentucky's coach for 24
years, immediately branded the
suit a "smear campaign" and as-
serted his innocence of any con-
nection with gambling.
MRS. LUCILLE Chumbley Brad-
berry of Athens, Ga., brought the
suit in behalf of her brother,
George Chumbley, formerly of
Richmond, Ky., Chumbley is one
of the alleged losers in gambling
operations the suit said were con-
ducted by "Curd and his co-con-
spirators."
The suit alleged that Curd,
Rupp and Costello "concocted a
fraudulent and debasing scheme
of gambling in schools, colleges
and university sports and ath-
letics" and "seduced student
leaders and players to betray
their institutions and devotees
of the institutions and college
sports."
The petition contended that one
of the group's methods of opera-
tion involved "manipulation and
fakement" of point spreads in bas-
ketball games.
* * *
RUPP'S statement asserted: "Of
all the smear campaigns that ever
have been conducted against any-
one, this is the rottenest. It is evi-
dently a well-organized campaign
aimed entirely to discredit me. The
timing of everything has been per-
fect."
Rupp, producer of three un-
official national championship
teams at Kentucky, did not sayj
why he felt anyone would want:
to discredit him. His reference to
"timing" apparently was made
because the state high school
basketball tournament is in
progress here.
"No one has fought for clean:
high school sports and tried to
keep them free from gambling;
harder than I have," Rupp said.
He said the suit evidently was an
attempt to discredit him in high,
school sports circles.

MICHIGAN DAILY
k Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.,
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
COLOR-BLIND MAN taking Physics 26.
One dark blue coat exchanged for one
light brown. Call Jim 7170. )24L
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; Shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )7B
REVOLVING book-case $5.00. French
love seat, Victorian side chairs, coun-
ter and scales. Mrs. Ruffins, 562 S. 7th.
)39F

IREHA
FOR SALE
EMERALD cut diamond ring, 4/5 carat.
Perfect blue-white Wesselton stone.
Ph. 3-0811 meal times. )41F
GOLF CLUBS, Wilson, registered set.
$75. Original $175. Ph. 2-3776.
FOR SALE - Studio davenport, very
good condition; 3 upholstered occa-
sional chairs; very good buy. Phone
3-0708. )42F
RCA RADIO - Table model, Golden
Throat speaker, Vic Term. $15. 2-4148.
)43F
"AFTER SIX" Tux, size 39 long. Call
3-2653 after six. )45F
COMPLETE SET of encyclopedia never
used. Call 3-1264 after 4 or to 8 p.m.
)46F
BIKE-Lightweight, men's, good condi-
tion, bargain. Phone 6077. )44F
GRANDFATHER clock. French love seat,
Victorian side chairs, counter and
scales. Mrs. Ruffins. 562 S. 7th. )47F
ROOMS FOR RENT
SUITE to share with board. 520 Thomp-
son. 18D
FOR IMMEDIATE occupancy; Excep-
tional double room with carpet, fire-
place, twin beds, privacy. Two blocks
from campus. Call 30849. )13D
ROOMS, roomettes and apartments, by
day or week for campus visitors. Cam-
pus Tourist Homes, 518 E. William.
Phone 3-8454. )3D
ROOMS FOR MEN -Complete second
floor and bath. Ph. 2-5268. )19D

ROOMS FOR RENT
FACULTY HOME ON CAMPUS - Large
single room for male faculty member
or graduate student; tile bath, oil
heat, comfortably furnished. 723
Church. Ph. 2-3541. )14D
HELP WANTED
DISHWASHER - Small Fraternity, 3
meals, machine. Full board, immediate
employment. Call S. L. Brown, 3-4707.
PART TIME WORK-Keystone Readers
Service of Detroit has openings for
six male students in Ann Arbor. $25.00
for 17 hour week (3 hours 4 days. 5
hours Saturday). Apply Michigan
State Employment office 111 Feich
(Corner N. Main) 2:00-4:00 p.m. Mon-
day only. )25H
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sale and service.
Morrill's
314 S. State St., Phone 7177. )2B

RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & T.V.
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T.V.
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1% blocks east of East Eng,

i
ORB

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

WASHING - Finished work and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
$1 WILL OIL and adjust any sewing
machine in your home. Phone 3-0691
anytime. )17B

1ntm.1 7

101

0

TOPS IN GRAPEFRUIT:
Rampaging Tigers Trounce Reds, 13-2

By The Associated Press
TAMPA, Fla.-The home-run
happy Detroit Tigers won their
eighth straight victory over Na-
tional League teams this spring by
outslugging the Cincinnati Reds,
13-12, yesterday.
The Tigers haven't ;lost a single
exhibition game yet to a National
League club. But they have won
only one in four games with Amer-
ican' League clubs.
* s s
THE RAMPAGING Tigers are
still on top of the mythical grape-
fruit circuit standings with an ov-
erall record of nine wins and three
losses.
The Tigers rallied for five
runs in the ninth inning to edge
the Reds before 1,150 fans in
the Tampa Fair Grounds. It
was the Reds' first loss °n six
games. The slugging spree was
featured by three home runs by
each team.
Walt Dropo homered twice and
Bob Nieman cleared the left field
fence for the Tigers, while Jim
Greengrass, Ted Kluszewski and
Wally Post homered for Cincin-
nati.
* * *
JIM DELSING drove in the win-
ning run in the ninth with a single
off Ed Blake, one of the five Cin-
cinnati pitchers.
Paul Foytack, Ted Kapuscin-
zki and Ray Herbert divided the
work on the mound for the
Tigers.
The Tigers staked Foytack to a
six run lead in the opening inn-
ing. Dropo and Nieman hit con-
secutive homers in that inning.
Two Tigers were on base when
Dropo homered.
BUT IT TOOK the ninth inning
rally to give the decision to Kap-
uscinski, another rookie. Herbert
finished out as relief pitcher by
retiring the Reds in order to pre-
serve the one-run margin.
Eddie Blake, the Reds' young
righthander from Milwaukee who
walked three men in the wild
ninth, was charged with the loss.
He followed Howie Judson, Niles
Jordan and Ernie Nevel on the

hit by rookie Bob Mainzer off
pitcher Bob Tiefenauer in the
eighth inning.
Hardest hit of three Cardinal
pitchers was Stu Miller, a sen-
sation when brought up late last
season. The young right hander
gave up six of the Milwaukee
runs before leaving the game
with a pulled shoulder in the
fourth inning.
Jim Wilson, the winner after six
innings of work, and Murray Wall
gave the cards 10 hits, three by
catcher Dick Rand.
* * *
ST. LOUIS (A) 5, CHICAGO (N) 4
SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.-
Rookie righthander Don Larsen
smashed his second home run of
the spring Friday to give the St.
Louis Browns a 5-4 victory over
the Chicago Cubs.
Larsen's home run came with
the bases empty in the sixth inn-
ing.
Third baseman Bill Serena un-
leashed his third homer of the
season for Chicago with one on
in the fourth off winner Virgil
Trucks.
Big Bob Rush was the losing

pitcher, giving, up two first-inn-
ing runs. He had gone 11 innings
without allowing an earned run
this spring.
* , * ,
NEW YORK (A) 8,
PHILADELPHIA (N) 3
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.-The
New York Yankees shelled three
rookie hurlers for 16 hits Friday
and trimmed the Philadelphia
Phillies, 8-3. The champs, in en-
joying their best hitting afternoon
of the spring, blasted a total of 27
bases.
BOSTON (A) 5,
PHILADELPHIA (A) 4
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.-
Dick Gernert's two out home run
off pitcher Joe Coleman tied the
game in the ninth and then two
errors by the Philadelphia Ath-
letics in the 10th handed the Bos-
ton Red Sox a 5 to 4 grapefruit
league victory here Friday.
NATIONAL BASKETBALL
ASSOCIATION PLAYOFFS
Ft. Wayne 84, Rochester 77
(Ft. Wayne leads 1-0 in best of
three series.)

QMeet your friends at 42
808 South State
-OPEN 24 HOURS
-Q4 e :: m se

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Mar. 22-Matter.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church- Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the pas-
tor, "Christians-Responsible Moral Agents."
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. "Biblical Manu-
scripts and Their Dating," with Profs. James
Zumberge and George Mendenhall as speakers.
Wednesday at 12:30: 25 minute devotional ser-
vice, with sermonette by the pastor.
Wednesday at 7:30: Midweek Lenten Vesper Ser-
vice, with sermon by the pastor.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Sts.
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon: The Air-Conditioned Conscience.
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 A.M.: Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Student Guild House 438 Maynard
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Dr. John Reed will discuss "The Layman's Point
of View" at 7:00 P.M. at the Congregational
Church.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom. Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Discussion Class, Pine Room "Inter-
cessory Prayer."
10:45 A.M.: Worship "These Are Blessed - The
Inwardly Pure." Dr. Large preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program. Rev. Erland
Wangdahl will give the sixth in the Affirma-
tions series on We Believe in the Kingdom of
God."
8:30 P.M.: Bible Study.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Rev. Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Rev. Charles Mitchell. Assistant Minister
Rev. Wm. S. Baker, University Pastor
Sunday Morning Services: 9:15 and 11:15 A.M.
Henry Kuizenga preaching, "The Obedient
Christ."
Sunday Morning 10:30: Student Bible Seminar.
Sunday Evening 6:30: Westminster Guild meeting.
There will be a film strip on World Student
Christian Federation. Comments by RajaNoser.
Elections also.

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
North Division at Catherine
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Miss Ada Mae Ames, Counselor for Women
Students
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Commentary.
9:50 A.M.: Student Breakfast, Canterbury House.
9:50 A.M.: Confirmation Breakfast, Recreation
-Room.
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer and Sermon.
5:15 P.M.: High School Club.
6:45 P.M.: University Student Seminars, Canter-
bury House, led by Dean Deborah Bacon and
the Rev. Wilbur R. Schutze.
8:00 P.M.: The Litany.
During the Week
Holy Communion 7:00 A.M. Wednesday (The An-
nunciation) and Thursday; 12:10 P.M. Friday.
Evening Prayer Monday through Saturday 5:30
P.M. Chapel. Student Tea, Canterbury House,
Friday 4 to 5:30.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M : Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Rev. Leonard Parr, Minister
10:00-10:40 A.M.: Questionnaire Hour in May-
flower Room.
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon "This I Believe"
V "That Life Never Cheats."
CONGREGATIONAL DISCIPLES GUILD
Dr. John Reed will discuss "The Layman's Point
of View at 7:00 P.M. in the Mayflower Room.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y.M.C.A. AUDITORIUM
Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A M., 7:30 P.M.
Thursdays: 7:30 P.M., Bible Study
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth"
WXYZ-ABC Network
Sundays: 1:00-1:30 PM.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, D.D., Pastor
Sunday-9:25 A.M.: Bible Class.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Service. Sermon by Rev.
Yoder-"Why Do We Not Believe The Truth."
7:00 P.M.: L.S.A. Meeting. Program on Music
by Mr. and Mrs. John Gustafson.
Wednesday-7:30 P.M.: Lenten Service.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2.1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.: Bible School.
11:00 A.M.: "Christian Marriage and The Chris-
tian Home"
6:15 P.M.: Grace Bible Guild supper.
7:30 P.M.: "The Kind of People The Lord 'Jesus
Wants To Meet."
Monday 7:30: Bible Class.
Wednesday 8:00: Prayer Meeting.
A Friendly Church where the Word is Preached.

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suggested for salt water use. 9 different
models including square stern-wide choice
of colors. Costs less than other popular
makes. Built by Grumman Aircraft Engi-

There Must Be
A
Reason!

"Why do so many former employees return
to Michigan Bell Telephone Company?
There is a reason, and indeed a large number of reasons.
Where else will they find:
Excellent chance for promotion
Convenience to campus and shopping certers
Steady and high income
Modern and comfortable lounges and cafeteria
Congenial associates

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Adult Group and church

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student Counselor
Mrs. Ruth Mars, Assistant Student Counselor
9:45. A.M.: Student Bible Class studies Ruth
and Esther.

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