100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 13, 1953 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


F
FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

P'AGE im

MOCK TRIAL:
Case Club Finalists Picked

* *

By JON SOBELOFF
After four weeks of exacting
preparation and a couple of hours
on their feet presenting arguments
and answering off the cuff ques-
tions fired by a three-man panel
of lawyers and professors, four
Law School juniors last night won
the semi-final round of the Camp-
bell case club competition.
The team of Donn Miller and
Theodore St. Antoine and the
team of Dave Belin and Hugh
Harness will compete April 29 for
the coveted Henry M. Campbell
Plaque in the finals of the annual
Law School contests.
* * *
DEFEATED IN the semi-finals
were the team of William Parmen-
ter and William Vobach and that
of William Lurey and Ray Trom-
badore.
In the imaginary appelate ac-
. tion argued by all four teams,
a big beer company, which had
been granted exclusive TV rights
by a Detroit football team sought
to enjoin a theater from screen-
ing the games and charging ad-
mission.
Acting as judges in the case were
two three-man panels. Phillip A.
Hart, legal assistant to Michigan
Gov. G. Mennen Williams and
former Detroit district attorney;
Harry G. Gault, former persident
of the Michigan Bar Association
and Prof. Russell A. Smith of the
Law School heard the arguments
in one courtroom.
Presiding in the other court-
room were John W. Neville, chief
of the regional anti-trust office in
Detroit; John W. Cummiskey,
member of the board of commis-
sioners of the state bar associa-
tion and Prof. Samuel D. Estep
of the Law School.

--Daily-Betsy Smith
CASE CLUB-Donn Miller, '54L, and Theodore St. Antoine, '54L,
(seated) examine cases with William Parmenter, '54L, and Wil-
liam Vobach, '54L, (standing) before the semi-final round of the
Campbell case club competition last night.

INFORMATION FILE:

Library Houses Human
Relations Area Records

By ELSIE KUFFLER
Tucked away in a corner of the
fourth floor of the General Li-
brary are a group of gray filing
cabinets.
Unobtrusive though they are
now, their contents may prove very
important to social scientists in

Come in and
try our
CHICKEN BARBECUE
SANDWICH
'The tJVnnei' Jell
808 S. State
UEBEB RCKECHa-

the future. Called the Human Re-
lations Area Files, the small five
by eight inch cards may provide a
short cut to valuable information
about almost 150 different cul-
tures of the world.
CRITICAL EXCERPTS from
books concerning particular cul-
tures and observations from field
studies are the chief sources of in-
formation for the files. After the
material has been collected, it is
first translated into English if
necessary, then classified and
finally filed.
Subject matter is diverse. It
may include anything from an
illustrated description of a Jap-
anese funeral to a dissertation
on how Indo-Chinese women
prepare soy beans.
Items telling how certain crops
are grown and the amount of rain-
fall in a given area, facts of great
importance to prospective trav-
elers, can also be found in the
records.
THEdFILES are the product of
three year's work by faculty of 16
universities, all of which are mem-
bers of Human Relations Area
Files, Inc.
Purpose of this corporation
is to organize into manageable
dimensionscultural data on peo-
ples all over the world, accord-
ing to Prof. Robert B. Hall of
the geography department, di-
rector of the project at the Uni-
versity.
Each university participating in
this venture specializes in a cer-
tain area of the world. The Uni-
versityhas been assigned the job
of gathering data on Japan.
FINANCED BY government and
University funds, groups of fac-
ulty members in the social sciences
visit Japan where they make stud-
ies relating to their particular
field.
When completed the file will
serve as a tool for the compara-
tive analysis of different cultures.
College Deans
Plan Meeting
President Harlan H. Hatcher
and deans of the University's 15
colleges will meet with represen-
tatives from Michigan junior col-
leges today in the Union to dis-
cuss teaching methods and .pur-
poses.
More than 100 junior college
representatives will hear Dean
Charles E. Odegaard of the liter-
ary college speak on "Common
Elements in Any College Program."
A. G. Umbreit, director of Mus-
kegon Community College will dis-
cuss "What a University Faculty
Should Know About the Com-
munity College" in a luncheon
address.
Inter-faculty conferences will
be held in the early afternoon to
exchange ideas on teaching meth-
ods and purposes.
Representatives attending the
conference, sponsored by the Com-
mittee on College Relations, will
have an opportunity to visit the
campus from 10 a.m. until noon.

First LS&A
Conference
To Be Held
The first of this semester's ser-
ies of literary college conferences
will be held at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday
at the League.
It is under the direction of the
college's steering committee.
* * *
THE STEERING committee, a
group composed of students in the
literary college interested in prob-
lems concerning the administra-
tive and educational functioning
of the college, is holding the con-
ference in an effort to obtain stu-
dent opinion on academic ques-
tions.
Coordinator of the group's ac-
tivities is Assistant Dean of the
literary college, Prof. James H.
Robertson.
The idea for the steering com-
mittee originated in 1947 when it'
was felt that there was a need for
discussion between interested stu-
dents and faculty on policies of
the college.
* * *
SINCE Dean Robertson took
over the project in the fall of
ered such topics as introductory
ered such topics as introductory
courses, counseling, exam proce-
dure, grading and foreign lang-
uage requirements.
Dean Robertson explained that
the "intention of the conference
is not primarily to affect reforms
but to insure that when changes
are made, the college is fully
aware of the implications and im-
pact of the changes on the stu-
dents, and that the students, in
turn, gain a clearernotion of the
complexity of running a college."
Although the conferences will
again be open to the public, the
committee has sent special invita-
tions to 60 students whom they
think represent a cross-section of
the campus and will give a fair
sampling of student views.
Loan, Banking
Clinic To Meet
Some 200 delegates from Mich-
igan, Ohio and Indiana will meet
here Tuesday for the annual Sav-
ings and Loan Association prob-
lems clinic in the Rackham Amphi-
theater.
Ralph A. Young, director of the
division of research and statistics
of the Federal Reserve System,
will be the principal speaker at
the opening session.
University President Harlan H.
Hatcher will also address the first
meeting.
Young will discuss the functions
of the Federal Reserve Bank sys-
tem and "Federal Reserve's Rela-
tions to the Current Monetary Sit-
uation."
Concluding the session, Prof.
Paul W. McCracken of the busi-
ness administration school will
discuss "The Business Outlook for
1953."
The annual event is conducted
by the School of Business Admin-
istration and the Extension Ser-
vice in cooperation with the Mich-
igan Savings and Loan League.
Courthouse Plans
Change Discussed
The County Board of Super-
visors yesterday considered the re-
vision of office space in the pro-
posed new $3,250,000 Courthouse.

Although the outside of, the
building has remained unchanged
from the original specifications,
the sizes of some of the rooms and
the location of several offices have
been changed, according to the
architect.

Embryo architects are in the
process of drawing up plans for
the new bank building on the
corner of E. Liberty and S. Divi-
sion streets.
The designs are part of a class
project in architecture 77 con-
ducted by Prof. George M. Mc-
Gov. William~s
To Speak Here
Gov. G. Mennen Williams will
be the featured speaker at 3 p.m.
Monday in the Rackham Lecture
Hall when the School of Educa-
tion honors 403 students who ex-
pect to receive teachers' certifi-
cates during 1953.
University vice-president Marvin
L. Niehuss will preside over the
convocation and Dean Willard C.
Olson of the education school will
introduce Gov. Williams. The gov-
ernor's subject will be "Develop-
ing Human Resources in Michi-
gan."
See gers To Talk
On BloodClotting
Dr. W. H. Seegers, Head of the
Department of Physiology and
Pharmacology of Wayne Univer-
sity College of Medicine will dis-
cuss the topic of "Blood Coagula-
tion" at 4 p.m. today in 1300 Chem-
istry Bldg.

Conkey of the architecture col-
lege. With at least three of the
seven weeks alloted for the draw-.
ings remaining, Prof. McConkey
said he expects some striking
plans to be turned in.
* * *
THE NEW two-story building
which costs an estimated $240,000
is expected to be completed next
fall. A certified architect has done
the actual work on the building,
McConkey said.
"The students are planning
how they would build such a
structure under similar condi-
tions in the future. The new
excavation in town, however,
does give them a practical prob-
lem to solve," Prof. McConkey
commented.
"The would-be architects are
each designing the building as
though he had been engaged to
do so," the professor emphasized,
"and each of them has his own
conception of how the bank should
be constructed."
ALL OF THE plans are being
drawn on standard presentation
sheets, although some of the stu-
dents are making models of their
bank designs.
When the sketches are finally
completed, Prof. McConkey said,
they will be shown to some local
bankers for their opinions.
"All of the students' bank build-
ings will be fireproof and most of
them will be of modernistic de-
sign," he added.

Student Architects Design
New Local Bank Structure

t

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
American Chemical Society Lecture,
Fri., Mar. 13, 8 p.m., 1300 Chemistry
Building. Dr. Henry B. Hass, Director
of Research, Sugar Research Founda-
tion, will speak on "The Commonest
Pure Organic Chemical."
Congregational Disciples Guild. Coun-
cii meeting at Guild House, 4 to 5:30
p.m.
Motion Pictures, auspices of Uni-
versity Museums, "Amoeba," "Amoeba
and Vorticenla," and "Life in a Drop
of Water" (color), Fri., Mar. 13, 7:30
p.m., Kellogg Auditorium. No admis-
sion charge.
Wesley Foundation. Superstition
Swirl Dance at 8 p.m. in the Wesley
Lounge.
Dr. W. H. Seegers, Head of the De-
partment of Physiology and Pharma-
cology of Wayne University College of
Medicine, will speak at 4 o'clck in
1300 Chemistry Building on the sub-
ject of "Blood Coagulation."
Hillel Foundation. Friday evening
services at 7:45. Fireside speaker will be

Professor William Haber of the Econom-
ics Department, speaking on America,.
Israel, and the World.
Roger Williams Guild. Meet at 7 p.m.
at the Guild House to go to hear
Bach's "St. Matthew Pasion" at Hill
Auditorium; returning afterward for
food, fellowship, and singing around
the fireplace.
S.R.A. Coffee Hour at Lane Hall, 4:15
to 5:30. Chinese Christian Fellowship
co-host. Students and faculty welcome.
Coming Events
School of Education Convocation hon-
oring candidates for the teacher's cer-
tificate will be held in the Rackhanl
Lecutre Hall on Monday afternoon,
Mar. 16, at three o'clock. The program
will be open to the public. Vice-Prest-'
dent Niehuss will preside and the Hon-
orable G. Mennen Williams, Governor
of the State of Michigan, will speak on
"Developing Human Resources in Mic#-
igan." The Convocation will be followed,
by a coffee hour and reception in the
Assembly Hall at four o'clock.
Hillel. The Friends Group and the
Unitarians will meet Sun., Mar. 15, 7
p.m. at Hillel. Dancing and games, re-
freshments will be served.
Faculty Women's Square Dance Clfb
will hold its March dance at 8:30 pm.,
Sat., Mar. 14, at Tappan Junior High
School. M. Van Ameyde, of Detroit,
will call the dances.
Hillel Supper Club is serving dinner
Sun., Mar. 15, from- 6 to 7 p.m., Hillel
Foundation.

"BEAT

'THE'
LAWS
by
William Sharp
Portfolio of 12
Drawings
Limited Edition
Size 13"x8" $10
Other drawings
Include:
In the Surrogate
Court
An Old
Acquaintance
The Interpreter
Counsel's Advice
"If Your Honor
Please"
Order in the Court
The Other Woman

it over to the
LITTLE CLUB
" FLOOR SHOW
" DANCING
9:30 - 12:30
MICHIGAN UNION

T v :':I
OW w.f

I

"If Your Honor Please"
A well known American artist depicts Court officers, defendants cnd
witnesses in a satirical style reminiscent of Daumier. Don't miss this
opportunity to secure your copy by sending $10.00 plus $.25 postage.
Money back guarantee if not satisfied.
A very appropriate gift for a friend. Include your check with the nane
and address and it will be shipped to any point in the U.S.A.
HENRY GOTTLIEB
Art Center for Lawyers
10 West 33rd St., New York t, N. Y. LOngacre 3-6817
Large selection of original oils, water colors, Audubon Birds and Currier
& Ives, also fine art reproductions of old and modern masters.

Friday Night

._..

NOTEWORTHY NEW RELEASES ON
COLUMBIA RE CORDs
ROMEO & JULIET - DRAMATIC SYMPHONY (BERLIOZ) - N. Y. PHILHARMONIC, MITROPOULOS
PIANO SONATA NO. 8 (MOZART); PARTITA NO. 1 (BACH) - DINO LIPATTI
A SONG RECITAL BY CLAUDIA MUZID (Soprano) AND ORCHESTRA
"RUSTIC WEDDING" SYMPHONY (GOLDMARK) - ROYAL PHILHARMONIC, BEECHAM
CHORALES AND CHORALE PRELUDES (BACH, KREBS) - E. P. BIGGS AND BRASS CHOIR
Arthur Godfrey's TV Calendar Show
with songs by The Mariners - Marlowe & Parker - Hale Loke - Janette Davis -
Julius LaRosa - The Chordettes - LuAnn Simms - Arthur Godfrey.

-';
I
'
,

I

- CAMPUS -
211 S. State St.
Phone 9013

MUSIC SHOPS

- DOWNTOWN -
205 E. Liberty St.
Phone 2-0675

kr

I

|

Artists:

E

-
4

1

.T

A

-----

Inter-Arts Magazine
TODAY is the last day we are
accepting manuscripts
U

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan