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March 13, 1953 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-13

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FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

McClellan Makes Two
All-Star Hockey Squads

Idins

over

RPI 3-2

Greenwood Club, Delta Sigma Delta Win
To Advance in Intramural Cage Tourney

. .y

.

Michigan, Boston U. Tangle
In 2nd Semi-Final Tonight
Desperate Gophers Score Twice in Final
Period To Break 1-1. Deadlock for Victory

Alex McClellan, star defense-
man of the Wolverine hockey sex-
tet, was named to two honorary
all-star squads in recent polls.
The Maize and Blue standout
was picked as one of three de-
fensemen on a 12-man All-Ameri-
can hockey team picked by coach-
es from leading colleges. Dick
Binning of Middlebury, and Bob
Monahan of Michigan Tech com-
plete the trio picked by the coach-
es representing ten schools, in-
cluding four from the west and
six from the east.
IN THE Denver Post's 1953 Mid-
west Hockey League All-Star team
selections, McClellan placed on
the second team along with team-
mates Willard Ikola in goal, and
John Matchefts at center.
Minnesota's great hockey team
dominated the first team on se-
lections by placing four men on
the squad. Goalie Jim Mattson,
defenseman and captain Tom
Wegleitner and forwards John
Mayasich and Dick Dougherty
made up two-thirds of the first
team.
North Dakota's star wing Ben'
Cherski and Denver defenseman
Eddie Miller filled out the start-
ing lineup. Miller is the only re-
peat selection from last year's
team. Rounding out the second

ALEX McCLELLEN
. . . All-American
squad is Elwood Shell, North Da-
kota defenseman, and wingmen
John Campbell of Minnesota and
Bill Abbott of Denver.
Gophers Mayasich and Mattson,
Herb LaFountaine and Frank Chi-
arelli, who led the east in scoring
for the second straight year, of
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,
and high tscoring Dick Rodenhish-
er of Boston University headed the
All-American selections conducted
annually by Bob Bier, sports edi-
tor of the Colorado Springs, Colo-
rado, Free Press.
Jim Haas of Michigan and Joe
DeBastiani of Michigan Tech re-
ceived honorable mention.

By PAUL GREENBERG
Special To The Daily
COLORADO SPRINGS - Tiny
RPI, fourth seeded, in a quartet
of collegiate hockey squads in the
NCAA tourney here, threw a bad
scare into the favored Minnesota
Gophers before bowing by one
goal, 3-2.
Paced by the great netminding
of Bob Fox, and some clever stick
handling by Frank Chiarelli, Am-
bros Mosca, and Co-Capt. Al
Moore, the Engineers from Troy,
N.Y., extended the Minneapolis
sextet all the way before losing.
TONIGHT MICHIGAN'S puck-
sters face off against Boston Uni-
versity at 8 p.m. The Terriers had
a 14-5 record during the season.
They boast a fast skating offense,
sparked by forwards Dick Roden-
hiser and Paul Whalen.
The Wolverines, despite the
fact that they came out of last
weekend's series with Michigan
Tech in poor physical shape, will
be at full strength for tonight's
encounter. The winner plays
Minnesota Saturday for the Na-
tional Collegiate title.
Minnesota took advantage Of a
penalty to RPI's co-captain Herb
LaFontaine to jump into an early
lead at 8:48 of the first period.
Bob Johnson slapped the puck
into an open net, vacated by Fox
while making a fine save on Min-
nesota wingman Ken Yackel.
)JLENSSELAER, refusing to crum-
ble, came fighting back to tie up
the game early in the second stan-
za, on an unassisted effort by the
No. 1 scorer in the Eastern area,
Frank Chiarelli.
With the score tied 1-1, play
speeded up considerably in the
-nal period. With LaFontaine
in the penalty box again, this
time for tripping, Dick Mere-
SCORING SUMMARY
FIRST PERIOD: 1-Minnesota, John-
son (Yackel, Tschida) 8:48. Penal-
ties-Minnesota: Meredith (trip-
ping), Wegleither (tripping); RPI:
LaFontaine (holding).
SECOND PERIOD: 2-RPI, Chiarelli,
(unassisted) 22:12. Penalties-Min-
nesota: Dougherty (holding), Yack.
el (slashing); Campbell, (tripping).
ThIRD PERIOD: 3-Minnesota, Mer-
edith (Johnson, Yackel) 4:35; 4-
Minnesota, Dougherty (Mayasich,
Campbell) 16:02; 5-RPI, Chiarelli
(unassisted) 17:34. Penalties-Min-
nesota: Dougherty (high stick),
Campbell(hooking); RPIn: LaFon-
taine, 2 (hooking, tripping).

dith flipped one past Fox to
give the Gophers a one-goal ad-
vantage.
Minnesota continued to press
and only brilliant netminding on
the part of Fox kept the Minne-
For The Birds
Badminton players in a Wat-
erman gym physical education
class were playing with birds
yesterday, but not the usual
kind.
They were visited by several
pigeons, who flew in the open
skylight, and proceeded to dive-
bomb the spacious gymnasium.
One of them apparently lost
his way, for he wound up as the
bird in a Badminton game,
when he slammed into a girder
and sailed down over a bad-
minton court.
The hard working players
didn't notice the bird until he
entered the game by splatter-
ing himself all over the court
floor.
The class instructor removed
the remains in short order, and
the players returned to their
game, using a bird of true Bad-
minton variety.
apolis sextet from building a size-
able lead.
* * *
FINALLY DIICK Dougherty
gave Minnesota its third and
clinching goal at 16:02 on assists
from John Mayasich and Gene
Campbell.
RPI made a valiant effort to
recover from the two-goal defi-
cit, and Chiorelli on a brilliant
solo dash made the score 3-2 at
17:34. However, Minnesota goalie
John Mattson turned aside the
Troy outfit's remaining drives to
seal the decision.
Minnesota's victory paved the
way for an all-Western final
should the Wolverines triumph to-
night. Michigan defeated Colorado
College in last year's champion-
ship tussle, 4-1.
The wintover Rensselaer sends
Minnesota into the finals in its
first trip to the tournament. Mich-
igan on the other hand is playing
in the tourney for the sixth
straight time and is shooting for
its fourth title and third in suc-
cession.

Dukes Upset
By Redmen
In NIT Tilt
NEW YORK - (R) - Slick
passing St. John's of Brooklyn
scored its third straight upset vic-
tory in the National Invitational
Basketball Tournament Thursday
night, beating favored Duquesne,
64-55, to enter the final round.
Duquesne, made a six-point
favorite by the local price makers,
didn't play up to the form it had
shown in two earlier tournament
games.
* * *
ST. JOHN'S thus reached the
NIT final for the first time since
1944.
The Brooklynites will meet the
winner of Thursday night's sec-
ond game between Seton Hall and
Manhattan in Saturday's final.
St. Johns, which wasn't seed-
ed in the 12-team tournament,
had surprised St. Louis and de-
fending champion La Salle in
earlier tournament games. The
Brooklyn Redmen now have won
14 of their last 15 games.
The Redmen were cool and sharp
in their passing and floor work
and they seldom let go a shot un-
less there was a good opportunity
to score.
Seton Hall 74, Manhattan 56

By PHIL JACOBUS led at the half, 24-10. Jim Gault
The Greenwood Club otulasted had 14 and Slim Van Donelen 10
a determined Newman Club last for the winners, while Ralph Straf-
night in the first place semi-finals
of the Independent League to take Entries to the all campus
a hard won 66-65 verdict. badminton doubles and singles
In the professional fraternity end today, Friday, March 13.
play-offs Delta Sigma Delta Competition begins Tuesday,
and Phi Delta Phi continued March 16.
their winning ways to become -Shelly Chambers
the first place finalists._________________
Delta Sigma jumped to a quickf
lead and led at the first quar- fon was hgh-point man for Nu
tet, 16-10, but their opponent, the Sigma with 7 points.
Law Club closed the gap to 25-23 Power-laden Sigma Chi placed
at the half. Chuck Murray, former 10 men in the Fraternity qual-
Michigan basketball captain, led fying swim meet to lead all oth-
the Delt Sigs with 17 points. Bill er houses. Sigma Nu and Theta
Randall had 10 for the losers. Xi followed the leaders by qual-
*, *. * ifying 6 and 5 men respectively.
IN THE OTHER game Phi Del- Led by Chuck Mitts, Dave Hig-
ta Phi easily rolled past Nu Sig- gins, and Jim Peterson, who all
ma Nu to capture an easy 45-23
victory. The Phi Delta Phi boys
* * *
I-M SCORES
Independent League
(Second Place Playoffs)
Dearborn 44, Lucky Seven 43
Lestor Co-op 46, Michigan Christian
Fellowship 20
(Third Place Playoffs)
Standish Evans 2, Canterbury 0,
(forfeit)
(Fifth Place Playoffs)
Presbyterians 34, Actuaries 17_
Professional Fraternities
(second Place Playoffs)
Phi Alpha Kappa 50, Alpha. Chi Sig-
ma 24
(Third Place Playoffs)
Psi Omego 2, Alpha Rho Chi O.
(forfeit) _______
Alpha Kappa Kappa 30, Alpha Ome-
ga 16
LATE HOCKEY SCORES
Detroit 2, Boston 2
Montreal 2, Chicago 2

qualified in three events, defend-
ing champions Sigma Chi seem to
be well on their way to annex-
ing another fraternity swimming
title.,
Mitts qualified in the 100 and
200 free styles and swam on the
200 yard free style relay. Peterson
qualified in the 50-yard free style,
the 50-yard backstroke. and the
200-yard medlay relay. Higgins is
entered in the 50 and 100-yard
free style.
Other double qualifiers were Wi-
ley Sams of Sigma Nu in the 50
and 100-yard free style, and Lee
McLaughlin in the 50-yard free
style and the 50-yard backstroke
event. McLaughlin, incidentally,
set a new IM record in the 50 yard
free style, covering it in 24.3 sec-
onds.

[NTERVIEWS

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will be held on CAMPUS
MARCH 19 and 20
by
BOEING AIRPLANE COMPANY
Movie will be shown at group meeting on first day
of visit. See B-47 and B-52 jet bomber flight fests,
guided missiles and other Boeing projects. Discussion
period will follow movie.
Openings are available for graduating and graduate
students in all branches of engineering (AE, CE, EE,
ME and related fields) and for physicists and mathe-
maticians with advanced degrees. Fields of activity
include DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, RESEARCH,
TOOLING and PRODUCTION. Choice of locations:
Seattle, Washington, or Wichita, Kansas.
These are excellent opportunities with one of the
country's leading engineering organizations-designers
and builders of the B-47 and B-52, America's first-
announced jet transport and guided missiles.
For details on group meeting and persona appointment contact your
PLACEMENT OFFICE

How do YOU get'
from college to here2
One answer is the men's Management Training Program
of the Bell Telephone System. It leads to an interesting job
-with good pay and a solid future. To get the facts, see rep-
resentatives of Michigan Bell Telephone Company who
will be here for personal interviews at
BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS
March 19 and 20
Here are answers to a few of your questions:
WHAT IS MANAGEMENT TRAINING?
A training program, with pay-and regular increases-for future
Mvanagement positions in the Bell System.
WHERE WILL I WORK?
Probably with Michigan Bell Telephone Company, although a
} few may work with other divisions of the Bell Telephone System.
IS ANY SPECIALIZED BACKGROUND REQUIRED?
No. College graduates need neither experience nor special
training.
Opportunities are unlimited in the fast-growing Bell System!
MICHIGAN BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY

C.7 r

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122 East Washington St.
Samuel J. Benjamin '27-Lit Owner

District Champions Meet'
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"-- *u OEING ---___________________
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lot-41
I 'mFgi

NEW YORK - P) -- With the
preliminary skirmishing out of the
way, the NCAA Basketball Tour-
nament gets going in earnest Fri-
day night with four regional tour-
naments at widely-scattered cen-
ters.
Nine teams who won their way
to conference championships start
the route to the NCAA title, with
seven at-large teams also scrap-
ping for the crown. Only twice in
14 years have teams from outside
the conferences won the title.
* * *
THE CONFERENCE kingpins
are favored to win it again this
year, since teams high up in the
latest Associated Press poll of
the top 10 are pegged in each of
the four regionals. The regional
winners will meet in the finals at
Kansas City next Tuesday and
Wednesday.
Kansas' defending champions,
currently rated fifth in the na-
tion, appear to have the most
difficult road to the finals.

In their regional tourney at
Manhattan, Kan., the Big Seven
champions, with a 16-5 season
record, meet Oklahoma City, 18-4,
a strong independent team ranked
10th in the country, in the first
round. Then they must face the
winner of the game between Ok-
lahoma A & M, 22-6 champions
of the Missouri Valley, and Texas
Christian's Southwest Conference
champions. Oklahoma A & M,
All freshmen out for the
track team, and any who are
interested are asked to come
down to Yost Field House on
Saturday, March 14, 1953, at
2:30 P.M.
rated No. 6 nationally, is favored
over the Texans, who have a 14-7
record. The Aggies split two regu-
lar season games with Kansas.
Indiana (19-3) goes against
De Paul (18-7). The other Chi-
cago game matches Notre Dame
(18-4) against Penn's Ivy League
champions.
Penn has a 21-4 mark and All-
America Ernie Beck, but Ivy
League teams haven't won many
NCAA tournament games and a
repeat of the early season thriller
between Notre Damne and Indiana
seems likely Saturday night. The
Irish nipped the Hoosiers, 71-70,
last December. That was before
the 17-game winning streak which
brought Indiana the Big Ten title.
* *~ *
THE FAR WEST tournament
has two All-America players, Bob
Houbergs of Washington and
Johnny O'Brien of Seattle.
BASEBALL SCORES
Athletics, 5, Dodgers 2
Yankees 5, Detroit 0
Red Sox 9, Cards 6

Beginning Today

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