100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 12, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 1953

i

TOP DOG NO LONGER:
Phi Delts To Oust Giant Pet

By JON SOBELOFF
It's definitely a dog's life for
Trevlac, Phi Delta Theta's mam-
moth great dane.
The Phi Delts have voted to do-
nate the monstrous animal, sup-
posedly the third largest dog in
the United States, to anyone who
will support him in the style to
which he is accustomed.
* * *
TREVLAC, according to John
Jenks, '53BAd., who took the 190
pound beast home with him last
summer, is accustomed to a couple
of quarts of milk, three eggs and
a big bowl of dog food plus as-
sorted bones and scraps every day.
* Jenks added that during his
summer stay the dog demolished
three screen doors, swept lamps
off tables with his tail when he
turned around and slowed traf-
fic when he appeared on the
front lawn.
Cause of the rift between Trev-
lac and the Phi Delts was his ex-
pensive food intake and the fact
that, when nervous, he isn't house-
broken.
Also, his barking, not confined
to any particular time of day or
night, drew complaints from Kap-
pa Alpha Theta sorority members
across the street that "their win-
dows buckle."
THE DECISION to oust the
good-natured canine came after he
developed a fondness for the bed
of one of the brothers who lives
downstairs.
Declaring that he or the dog
would have to go, the unhappy
fellow moved to have Trevlac ex-
pelled from the house. He was
backed up by a majority of the
Phi Delts in a close vote.
The impending expulsion will be
nothing new to Trevlac, whose un-
usual name is Calvert spelled
backwards. He has previously been
expelled by Phi Delt chapters at
Bowling Green and Michigan
State Colleges.
Sympathetic Phi Delts explained
that Trevlac, though essentially a
house dog, was "just too big." A
committee has been appointed to
find the oversized thoroughbred a
new home.
Henry Heil, '53, Phi Delta Theta
president, explained that anyone
with an elephant or a goldfish can
trade him for Trevlac with no
questions asked.
"We could keep an elephant out-
side," Heil explained.
Injunction Blocks
War On Disease
Kalamazoo County was blocked
Tuesday in its efforts to eliminate
a spreading hog disease when an
injunction was issued against an
ordinance which prohibited feed-
ing of uncooked garbage to hogs
and required disposal of all gar-
bage by landfill.
MEN

S * s

-Daily--Tim Richard
TREVLAC ... TOO MUCH DOG
Newsman Tells Differences
Between U.S., Danish Press

THE
CITY BEATI
Former University Hospital em-
ploye Benny Thomas was bound
over to circuit court yesterday on
the twin charge of felonious as-
sault and unlawfully driving away
an automobile.
The 30-year-old Willow Village
resident represented himself be-
fore Municipal Judge Francis L.
O'Brien in his examination yes-
terday. Tuesday, March 24 has
been set as.the date for his circuit
court hearing.
MAYOR William O. Brown, Jr.,
has gained the support of three-
top-level automotive executives in
his efforts to get two toll high-
ways built in the state.
Henry Ford, George Romney
and H. J. Ferry, all leaders in
the industry, sent their written
endorsements to the mayor this
week.
The Ann Arbor chief executive
is chairman of a large citizens
group seeking State Legislature
approval of a speial turnpike au-
thority which would supervise
construction of toll roads between
the Bay City area and Toledo, via
Detroit, and between Detroit and
Chicago.
* w *
FORMER county Prosecutor
Douglas K. Reading appeared sur-
prised yesterday at rejection by
the State Supreme Court of pis
move to declare Western Union
offices in the county a public nui-
sance for transmitting horse race
bets.
In a five-two decision Tues-
day, the court rejected both a
temporary injunction against
transmission of betting mon-
ey by the company and an order
requiring the firm to disclose
its records. The case was filed
by Reading in June, 1951.
The former prosecutor declined
comment on the high court's ac-
tion pending study of the deci-
sion.
OPPOSITION TO legislation
which would legalize bingo and
raffles in the state shaped up in
the city yesterday as the Ann Ar-
bor Ministers' Association, execu-
tive committee of the Ann Arbor
Council of Churches and the Coun-
cil of United Church Women of
Ann *Arbor adopted motions
against the proposal.
Their reaction came on the
heels of formal organization
Saturday of the Inter-Organiza-
tional Committee, a group in-
cluding representatives of 24
local lodges, veteran's organiza-
tions and similar groups who are
working to get the legislation
passed.
TWO Detroiters'received jail sen-
tences from Circuit Judge James
R. Breakey, Jr., Tuesday for tick-
et scalping at the Michigan State
game here last fall.
Previously sentenced to short-
er terms in municipal court, Domi-
nic DePiazza and. Jack Yeszin were
given 90 and 60 day terms respec-
tively. In addition Yeszin was or-
dered to pay $50 in costs or serv
an additional 30 days.

MUSIC, MUSIC, MUSIC:
American Music Keeps
English Librarian Busy

Technic Sale
Michigan Technic, the engi-
neering school magazine, will
be on sale at the engineering
arch today and tomorrow.
Tickets will be sold at the
same place for the engineering
school dance, "Slide-Rule Ball,"
sponsored by the Michigan
Technic. Tickets are $2.50.

American music can be a full
time job in Britain, as Heather
Bulman ought to know.
Miss Bulman, who visited Ann
Arbor last week on a tour of the
country, has the exacting job of
chief music librarian at the Ameri-
can Library in London-and the
duties of promoting understand-
ing of American music and facili-
tating the visits of American art-
ists to the British Isles.
KEPT "frightfully busy" at her
job, Miss Bulman is constantly be-
* ,*

understand a country from a .
distance."
Her main desire is to survey the
musical arts. During her few days
in Ann Arbor last week, she vis-
ited the opera workshop's produc-
tion, of "Faust,'" Prof. Maynard
Klein's University Choir and lec-
tures on American piano music by
Wiley Hitchcock, plus meeting
members of the music school fac-
ulty.
The young Britisher also made
her way to the Arts Theater Club,
noting with great interest the
growth of the arena theater in
America.Of the country in gen-
eral, she commented that the
most striking thing was the
"youthfulness of men holding jobs
of great responsibility, both in in-
dustry and the arts."
Dean Writes
On Accounting

Calaghan Wil
Spea._Monday
James Callaghan, a Labor mem-
ber of Britain's House of Com-
mgons, will discuss "Britain's
Struggle for Economic Survival"
at 4:15 p.m. Monday, in Auditor-
ium A, Angell Hall.
Callaghan is Parliamentary and
Financial Secretary to the Admir-
alty and was previously assistant
secretary to the Inland Revenue
Staff Federation, a post which he
held until 1947.
Beginning his career as a tax
officer, Callaghan in 1945 sub-
mitted his name to Transport
House, the British Labour Party
Office, as a Parliamentary candi-
date. Elected to Parliament in
July, 1945, he became private sec-
retary to the Under-secretary of
State for Foreign Affairs.
Callaghan is considered an au-
thority on taxation and also has
been mentioned as a possible fu-
ture First Lord of the Admiralty.

i

Buddhist Art
Shows Change
In Religions
The changes which have taken
place in the Buddhist figures of
China and India indicate a pro-
portional change in the religious
life of the people, Prof. Max Loehr
of the Fine Arts department point-
ed out yesterday.
In his lecture before the anthro-
pology club Prof. Loehr elaborated
on the various cultures which have
influenced the religious art of
North Asia and southeast Asia.
Using slides as illustrations he
showed the general decline of re-
ligious ,feeling among the people
as indicated by the ornate dress
of the figures and their lack of
asceticism in general.

f-

II

3~
.,-,,,,(

t

"Political affiliation is the main
difference between the American
and Danish press," Johannes
Laursen of the Danish Informa-
tion Service said yesterday after-
noon. \
Laursen told student and fac-
ulty members of the journalism
department that the four major
political parties in Denmark each
have their own press. Consequent-
ly, in any town with a population
of 10,000 to 20,000 inhabitants
there are usually four newspapers
** *
THE FORMER Copenhagen
newsman pointed out that the
Danes have no newspapers with a
circulation comparable to Ameri-
can papers. "Our largest is 200,-
000," he said, "but there is one
newspaper for every 30,000 inhabi-
tants."
He attributed the large number
of newspapers to the sharp ideo-
logical differences of the parties.
"In Denmark there are no
chain newspapers," Laursen ex-
plained. "They are all owned
privately or by communities, in
which case they do not operate
for a profit." The nearest thing
to a syndicated column in Den-
mark are the "canned editorials"
that the parties put out for the
smaller papers, he added.
Commenting on the peculiarities
of the Danish press, Laursen re-
APPLICATION
PHOTOGRAPHS
FOR BUSINESS FIRMS
AND TEACHING STAFFS
FOR SPECIAL SCHOOLS
AND SCHOLARSHIPS
FOR SUMMER JOBS
AND FOREIGN TRIPS
A PHOTO SERVICE
UP TO DATE
WITH PRINTS DEVELOPED
WHILE YOU WAIT
SNIDER STUDIO
213 S. Main Street

ferred to the custom of enigmatic
signatures rather than by-lines.
"In this respect Danish news-
papers don't really write for the
people but other newspapers
According to Laursen a Danish
newspaper office is very quiet com-
pared to American offices. "We
have no city rgom," he said. "Every
reporter has his own office."
around town," he pointed out.
Speech Club
To Affiliate
The formation of a local chapter
of Sigma Alpha Eta, national
speech and hearing fraternity,
will be completed in April.
Now existing under the title of
University Speech and Hearing
Club, the local group's constitu-
tion has just been accepted by
the University and is awaiting fi-
nal approval from the national
headquarters.
Officers for the Michigan chap-
ter are: Louise Feldman, Grad.
president; William Wolski, Grad.,
vice president; Robert Benson,
Grad., recording secretary; JoAnne
Mendlow, '53, corresponding sec-
retary and Vonda Gend,, '54,
treasurer.

i

I11

i

ro

1b

PURCHASE
Camera Shop
Movie Projector
Rentals
Polaroid Land
Cameras at
$89.50
for that picture
in a minute.
1116 So. university Ave.
Phone 6972

A BALFOUR DIAMOND
0 ~ IS ONE SHE WILL CHERISH
Yourpurchase of the engagement ring requires that you
select wisely, and with full confidence in the diamond
merchant. We are fully trained and equipped to assist you in
making a wise and proper selection, and invite your inspection
of our offerings.
"HOME OF THE OFFICIAL MICHIGAN KING"
L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY
1321 South University Avenue - Ann Arbor, Michigan
ENGINEERS, MATHEMATICIANS

x

L
r

ON

ONE STOP at
Packard Laundry
takes care of all 3:
and fast!

i~*)

AND PHYSICISTS
YOU HAVE
A DATE

Y

°:.
,, 1

. +
r
/
o

LAUNDRY
-Hour Service
Using Maytag Automatic Washers
that wash clothes really clean! Serve
yourself, WASH & DRY in less than 1
hour. No risk of damage to your daintiest
washables.
DRY CLEANING
10% Discount
Cash and carry discount for expert, guar-
anteed work by Michigan Dry Clean-
ers Co.
SH-IRT SERVICEF

4

TODAY
Bell Aircraft representatives will be here to discuss

with you the engineering opportunities in all fields
now available with this leading pioneer in the
challenging fields of GUIDED MISSILES, SUPER-
SONIC AIRCRAFT, ROCKET MOTORS and
ATRBRNE ELECTRONIC EOUIPMENT. Long

I-

0

I

.I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan