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March 12, 1953 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-12

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,.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAMY

PA-V-V. TTMV

THE MTCTTTEa v.[a N D1l.AIT IT '1#!h
.. U

CAIUJZi 1' U.~ x

Gophers

RPI

Op en

Ice

Sigma Chi, ATO 'B' Cagers
SWin To Gain Playoff Finals

By COiKY SMITH
In a hotly contested battle from
start to finish, Sigma Chi defeat-
ed Chi Psi, 32-22, in a semi-final
class "B" contest last night and
earned the right to meet Alpha
Tau Omega in the finals next
week.
With the combined efforts of
Ed Hickey, Russ Chandler, and Ed
Meads, the Sigma Chis started
The fraternity swimming pre-
liminaries will be held Thurs-
day night at 7:30 in the IM
pool. Sigma Chi is the defend-
ing champion. Some twenty
teams have entered. The finals
will be held at Open House
Thursday, March 19. In the div-
ing events last night the first
five places were: Lutz, (Pi
Lambda Phi); Fox, (Pi Lambda
Phi); Hanley, (Sigma Phi Ep-
silon); Watson, (Sigma Chi);
and Holderness, (Phi Kappa
Psi).
--Ed Olds
strong and finished the first half
with a 14-7 advantage. Hickey
dropped in eight counters while
Chandler and Meads tallied 6
points apiece. Ron Wells scored
seven points for the losers.

IN ANOTHER "B" basketball
game, Alpha Tau Omega romped
over Sigma Phi Epsilon, 25-19.
Bill Johnson lead ATO with eight
points, while Ken Plumb netted '7
points in the win that pits ATO
against Sigma Chi in the first
place finals. Jay Schoettley scor-
ed seven points for Sigma Phi
Epsilon.
Sigma Alpha Epsilon outlast-
ed Phi Kappa Tau, 31-26, to
gain a berth in the second place
playoff. Ron Norene was the
high scorer for SAE with a total
of 12 points. Topping both teams
was Phi Kappa Tau's Ernie
Constan who garnered 15 count-
ers.
The Hawaiian Club squeaked by
a scrappy Wesleyan team, 23-22.
Pint-sized Leila Wong, making up
for his size with speed and agility,
netted 11 of the 23 points for the
Hawaiian Club.
In another close contest, Delta
Kappa Epsilon edged Acacia, 20-
19. Dan Converse and Carl Bross
each tallied six points for the win-
ners.
IM CAGE SCORES
Pharmacy 26, Cardinals 18
Phi Kappa Psi defeated Phi
Sigma Delta (forfeit).

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SCENE OF ACTION-This is a scenic view of the Broadmoor Ice
Palace in Colorado Springs, where the NCAA hockey tournament
opens tonight.
* * * *
FROM PONIES TO PUCKS:
.Famed Broadmoor Ice Palace
Scene of Hockey Tournament

I AT
Mueet
'M', Boston U
Victor Vies
WithWinner
Michigan Opens Title
Defense Tomorrow
By HANLEY GURWIN
Johnny Mariucci's Minnesota
Gophers meet the Engineers of
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
tonight in the opening round of
this year's NCAA hockey cham-
pionships at Colorado Springs,
Colorado.
The winner of this contest will
meet the victor of tomorrow's clash
between Michigan and Boston Uni
versity in the deciding game on
Saturday night to determine the
NCAA champion for 1953.
* * *
BOTH THE Gophers and RPI
will be playing tonight in their
initial appearances in the tourna-
ment held annually at Broadmoor
Ice Palace. Michigan has held the
crown for the past two years.
The Engineers, who boast an
impressive 14 won, three lost,
and one tied record against the
class ' of the Eastern sextets,
will also be getting their first
dose of Midwestern competition
when they take on the MCHL
co-leader.
Paced by the number one line in
the MCHL of Johnny Mayasich
Dick Dougherty, and Gene Camp-
bell, the Gophers will be out to
Continuing the policy of on-
the-spot coverage of all top
Michigan sports events, Daily
sportswriter Paul Greenberg
catches a plane for Colorado
Springs today from where he
will give readers first-hand re-
ports on Michigan's bid to cap-
ture it's third straight NCAA
hockey crown.
keep the supremacy in the Mid-
west, from where four of the five
champions have come.
Minnesota finished the cam-
paign with a league record of 16
wins and four losses to tie for first
place with the Wolverines. How-
ever, of the four meetings between
the two leading clubs, the Goph-
ers turned back the Maize and
Blue on three occasions.
The Wolverines arrived by plane
in Colorado yesterday and will
work out today at the Ice Palace.
Baseball
Chicago Cubs 6, Cleveland 4
N.Y. Giants 7, White Sox 3
Washington 7, Yankees 4
Cincinnati 11, Phillies 7
Detroit 14, Braves 10
Red Sox 5, St. L. Cards 3
Brooklyn 4, Athletics 2

GROFFSKY MOST VALUABLE:

By DICK LEWIS
Ray Pavichevich, ball-hawking
Hoosier from East Chicago, In-
diana, was chosen captain of the
-1953-54 edition of the Wolverine
basketball team at a players'
meeting held yesterday.
At the same time, sophomore
center Paul Groffsky gained the
nod as the squad's most valuable
player for the season just con-
cluded.
* * *
SOFT - SPOKEN Pavichevich,
successor to another Hoosier, Doug
Lawrence, has cavorted at the
guard and forward spots during
his two years on the varsity, regis-
tering 233 points over that span.
A total of 169 of these tallies have
come in Big Ten competition.
Pavich, as his team-nates
call him, racked up 136 counters
last season; his high-water
mark being 17 in an early-sea-
son triumph over Pittsburgh.
The 5-11 backcourt performer
hit double figures in four other
contests and is regarded by Coach
Bill Perigo as a top-notch defen-
sive player with a special talent
for -stealing passes from the op-
posing team.
* * *
HE ALSO rates as a good man
to have in there when the Maize
and Blue quintet is freezing the
ball.
Groffsky paced all Michigan
point-getters this past season
Nine IWrestling
Letters Given
Coach Cliff Keen, whose Wolver-
ine wrestlers picked up their fifth
Big Ten title last Saturday, an-
nounced yesterday the recipients
of varsity letter winners.
Of the nine men earning the
awards, five will enter the Na-
tional Collegiate tournament to
be held March 27 and 28 at Penn
State.
Snip Nalon, Andy Kaul, Joe
Scandura, Miles Lee and Dick
O'Shaughnessy all try their luck in
the NCAA festivities, while the
other letter winners were Joe At-
kins, Jack Gallon, Harold Holt,
and Bronson Rumsey.
A reserve award was presented
to Harmon Nine, and freshman
numerals were given to Charlie
Anderson, Don Haney, Frank Kirk,
Bob Knutson, Ray O'Shaughnessy,
John McMahon, Jack Porter and
Mike Rodriquez.
rk-

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Pavichevieh Elected New Cage Captain

RAY PAVICHEVICH
. . . cops cage captaincy
* * *
with 301 counters in 22 contests
for a 13.7 average.
Playing out of his pivot post,
the 6-4 Maplewood, New Jersey,
crowd-pleaser found the range for
10 or more points on 17 different
occasions, his top effort coming
on 25 scores against Purdue at
Laf ayette.
Besides being a tower of
strength off the boards, Groffsky

MINIMUM THIS SUMMER
$600.00
IN MICHIGAN
Fascinating summer assignment
pays you guaranteed income with
opportunity to earn over $1000.00..
Openings forscollege men and
women to assist the director of
CHILDCRAFT in your home com-
munity.
A MARSHALL FIELD OWNED
ORGANIZATION
Ask for Mr. Gibson, Michigan
Union, Summer Placement
Thurs., March 12-1 to 5 P.M.

was also instrumental in all six
of Michigan's victories. He netted
15 points in the opener against
Marquette, came back with 16
against Pitt, and then rolled up
25 against the Boilermakers.
In Michigan's second Big Ten
win, a 66-61 conquest of Iowa,
Groffsky was red-hot with 18
counters in the first half, finally
winding up with 19 for high point
honors that evening.
Big Grof also amassed 19 in the
defeat of Washington of St. Louis
and responded with 15 in the rec-
ord-breaking triumph over Purdue
at Ann Arbor.
In rolling up his 106 field goals
and 89 free throws, Groffsky also
paced the Maize and Blue quintet
with a .344 shooting percentage.

y

By ED WHIPPLE
Daily Sports Editor
Snuggled as close as it could get
to the Eastern base of Colorado's
Rocky Mountains stands a chalk
white structure . . . once a mil-
lionnaire's polo palace . . . now
the annual goal of over 50 Amer-
ican college hockey teams.
It's the famous Broadmoor Ice
Palace where Michigan, Minnesota,
Rensselaer, and Boston University
battle these next three days for
the Stanley Cup of college hockey
... a mammouth trophy that goes
to the winner of the Sixth An-
nual National Collegiate Athletic
Association Championship.
THERE'S NOTHING especially
alluring about the rink's physical
properties. It holds only 2200 spec-
tators . . . half as many as Mich-
igan's Coliseum . . . and most of
them have to sit at either end.
It has no dressing rooms. The
players change clothes in the
Broadmoor Hotel, walk a quarter
of a mile around a scenic lake
to the Ice Palace, and put on
their skates in the back room.
After the game, they reverse the
probedure.
Such poor facilities result from
the rink's origin. It was put up by
Spencer Penrose, who made mil-
lions on Colorado's famous Crip-
ple Creek silver mine, and spent
them building the Broadmoor
Hotel resort.
* * *
HE HAD BUILT an indoor rid-
ing academy and polo practice
palace in 1928, but none of his
guests used it. Then Penrose saw
an ice show in London to prompt
the conversion of his horse-go-
round into the Ice Palace in 1938.
Colorado College hockey teams
have used it since then, and na-
tional figure and speed skating
championships have taken place
there in addition to the NCAA '
puck tourney. All sorts of an-
imal heads still adorn the walls
of the Ice Palace as a reminder
of its days as a horse arena.
Why do hockey players feel so
lucky if they're members of one
of the four teams picked each year
to make the Broadmoor trip? {

How do you get
One answer is the men's Management Training Program
of the Bell Telephone System. It leads to an interesting job
with good pay and a solid future. To get the facts, see rep-
resentatives of Michigan Bell Telephone Company who
will be here for personal interviews at
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
PLACEMENT OFFICE -MARCH 17
Here are answers to a few of your questions:
WHAT IS MANAGEMENT TRAINING?
A training program, with pay-and regular increases-for future
Management positions in the Bell System,
WHERE WILL I WORK?
Probably with Michigan Bell Telephone Company, although a
few may work with other divisions of the Bell Telephone System.
IS ANY SPECIALIZED BACKGROUND REQUIRED?
No. College graduates need neither experience nor special
training.
Opportunities are unlimited in the fast-growing Bell System!
MICHIGAN BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY

IT'S THE atmosphere . . . the
rarified atmosphere of mile high
Colorado Springs. From the time
the special plane importing the
competing teams lands, there's a
real carnival spirit displayed by
the officials of Colorado Springs
and the Broadmoor . . . located
aig fw iesoutside of town in
sight of Pike's Peak.
Old Spencer Penrose really
outdid himself on his Hotel. It
boasts (in addition to such com-
mon things as tennis courts and
bowling alleys) horselack rid-
ing, a gigantic golf course, a
movie theatre, an outdoor stad-
ium, indoor and outdoor swim-
ming pools, a railroad up the
side of Cheyenne Mountain be-
hind the Broadmoor, green-
houses, stores, and, of course,
the Ice Palace.
The players have the run of the
hotel. Guided tours around the
scenic countryside are also ar-
ranged for them. Michigan's play-
ers have been there so often they
forego the tours. They are famil-
iar enough with the place to ex-
change first names with the bell-
hops and clerks upon arrival.
S * *
MICHIGAN PLAYERS are re-
garded with a jealous respect by
the rabid Coloradans. They haven't
liked watching the Wolverines take
three championships from under
their noses.
When they're not working out,
sleeping, or eating, the Wolver-
ines spend most of their time
lounging beside the heated out-
door pool. And their main topic
of conversation, believe it or not,
is hockey. In spite of other di-
versions, every player has come
900 miles with the idea of win-
ning.
Come game time Penrose's old
polo palace is jammed to the raft-
ers. The Springs ... home of Col-,
orado College ... goes hockey hap-
py. Last year tourney officials had
a difficult time procuring a ticket
for an important person like the
town's mayor.
Why is the tourney always held
at the Broadmoor? You have to
see it once to understand why no
one else could stage it like the
Broadmoor does, footing all the
expenses from the time each team
leaves home until it's back again.
The Colorado folks do such a
good job no one cares that the
games are played in a 25-year old
polopalace. They make hockey
king.

JU,6t (Recekme4

Large Shipment of
ALL-WOOL
TOPCOATS
in the new raglan styles
In light shades
of Grey and Tan
Walk a few steps
and save dollars.
KUOH N'S
217 E. Liberty Ph. 8020

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4-

Collegiate Cuts
FOR SPRING!
They're Smart,
Suave, Individualistic
8 TONSORIAL ARTISTS
- No Waiting -
The Dascola Barbers
Liberty, near Mich. Theatre

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Look around! You'll, see mope and

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Entire Student Body Agrees
New Arrow Radnor Is "Hit!"
New Rounded-Point Collar,
Small-Knot Tie, Smart
Campus Style Note

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Illini Honor Kerr
CHAMPAIGN-(A)-John Kerr,
6-10 center, was named 1953-54
captain of Illinois' basketball team
Wednesday night and Irv Bemor-
as was selected "most valuable
player" for this season.
Bemoras, all-Big Ten guard
wound up his three year campaign
at Illinois with 822 points for a
new school record. The old three-
year mark was 777 by Don Sun-
derlage who was graduated in 1951.

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ARROW "SUSSEX"
has a widespread soft collar
with stays.

dt

A grand selection! Solid color medium shades in famous
Arrow shirts! Choose your favorite collar styles: wide-
spread, "regular," long points, short points, low-slope
collars and others. Like all Arrows, they carry the Mitoga
trade-mark that assures trim, neat, tapered fit. Fine Sanfor-
ized@ fabrics (shrinkage not more than 1%). For the per.
fect solid color shirts to wear with all your suits, come see
our "Arrow Tones" today!

campus cruises .
are more fun when you
look your best in Seven Seas
Slacks. College credits for prop-
er Innn- nerfo* nlonts 4rfmou

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h WRTS TIES UNDERWEAR . HANDKERCHIEFS * SPORTS SIJT$ -ete

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