100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 11, 1953 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

________________________________________ I I

Phi Gams, Sigma
Chi Gain 'A' Final
Phi Delts Trample Betas, 52-19;
Zeta Beta Tau Rips Delta Sig, 55-16

Bright Future Foreseen
For Michigan Thinclads

PIVOT PROWESS:

Groffsky Tops in 'M'_ScoringParade

By .PHIL DOUGLIS
Sigma Chi and Phi Gamma Del-
ta blasted their way into the final
of the fraternity "A" basketball
league last night by rolling up
semi-final victories.
Staving off a furious last min-
ute rally, the Sigma Chi's edged
Sigma Phi Epsilon 33-31, while
Phi Gamma Delta unleasheda
blistering second half attack to
down Pi Lambda Phi 45-30.
SIGMA CHI, trailing by two
*points at half time, due to the
scoring prowess of Sig Ep's Syd
Cook, opened up in the third pe-
riod, and then hung on to win.
Sigma Chi's Dick Balzhiser led the
third period rally by hitting eight
points.
With only a minute left in the
game, Sig Ep's Cook and Jack
Main notched baskets, pulling
their squad to within two points
of the Sigma Chi team. But Sig-
ma Chi held, and wrecked Sigma
Phi Epsilon's final bid with only
eight seconds left. The loser's
Cook was high scorer with 17
markers.
In the other semi-final first
place play-off game, Phi Gamma
Delta, paced by consistent Joe
Middleton, roared from behind to
blast Pi Lambda Phi, who couldn't
keep up the fast pace.
MIDDLETON, scoring 17 points
for high point honors, kept the
Phi Gams in the game in the first
' half, and then turned the reigns
over to Al Mann, who sparked the
second half rally with eight points.
In other "A" league action, Phi
Delta Theta routed Beta Theta
+ Pi 52-19 in a second place semi-
final, Sigma Alpha Epsilon gained
a forfeit win over Triangle and
Zeta Beta Tau smashed Delta Sig-
'Hoop Coaches
Name Big; Ten
All-rStar Team
CHICAGO-Big Ten coaches
Wednesday unanimously chose
champion Indiana's one-two of-
fentive punch-Don Schlundt and
Bob Leonard-for the 1953 Asso-
ciated Press all-Big Ten team and
Ohio State's Paul Ebert.
ALL THREE appeared on the
} first-team ballot of every confer-
ence coach. Tthe other two all-
star choices are Chuck Mencel of
Minnesota and Irv Bemoras of Il-
linois. They piled up decisive,
though not unanimous, vote totals.
The cage mentors put
Schlundt at his regular center
position and Leonard and Mencel
at their regular guard posts.
Ebert, a center, and Bemoras,
normally a guard, were shifted
to forward.
Selection of Schiundt, the 6 foot
9, inch Hoosier sophomore who
smashed all Big Ten individual
w scoring records this season, was a
virtual certainty since early in
the season.
ELECTRIC DRY SHAVER. 4 shavin
edges, 2 on each head. A high qual-
ity precision instrument that does a
fine shaving job for both men and
women. Operates on 60 cycles, 110
volts, A.C. only. $5.95 postpaid. Ck.
or Ml. . No C.O.D.'s. R. L. Bunker,
2100 Prairie Ave. Downers Grove, Ill.
The modern trend
is here!
4 the cost is the same
"6 experts to serve you
U of M BARBERS

715 N. University
Want to travel
and study
abrad
abUroad?

ma Phi 55-16.in third place semi-
finals, and Theta Xi defeated Aca-
cia 39-25 while Phi Kappa Psi
downed Tau Delta Phi 64-20 in
fourth place semi-finals.
PADDLEBALL
Kappa Sigma 2, Theta Chi 1
Alpha Omega defeated Alpha Kappa
Psi (forfeit)
Tau Epsilon Rho 2, Delta Sigma Del-
'ta l
Law Club 3, Alpha Rho Chi 0

JOHN ROSS
.. . mile champ

Though the Michigan track
team again came off second best
to the Fighting Illini this week-
end, the results of the indoor con-
ference meet forecast a pleasant
future for the Wolverines.
Michigan continued to uphold
its tradition of fine well-balanced
teams with extra strength in the
distance events. The Wolverines
placed point winners in eleven of
the twelve events, failing only to
qualify a man in the broad jump.
FOR THE THIRD straight year
a man wearing the Maize and
Blue was the one to break the
tape in both the mile and two mile
run.
It was a repeat victory for
John Ross, who last year set
the conference record of 4:09.4.
This time, however, he was care-
ful not to extend himself to the
fullest so he could double in the
half mile later in the meet.
In the two mile George Lynch,
who had transfered to Michigan
from Illinois, ran one of the finest
races of his career, spurred on
by the shouts of his ex-teammates
to their own two miles, Ocie Trim-
ble, to "Get Lynch."
* * *
IF THE Big Ten had handed
out a medal for the most cour-

Ohio State Swimmers Win
Title- Despite Lack of Depth

By IVAN KAYE
Depth in talent is usually the
mark of a championship team, but
this factor was conspicuous by its
absence from the Ohio State swim-
ming aggregation this season.
The Buckeyes, whose varsity
never numbered more than eleven,
grabbed the Western Conference
champions ip last week on the
strength o key performances by
four swimmers.
* * *s
IT WAS Ford Konno, who tri-
umphed in the 1500 meter free-
style, Yoshi Oyakawa, champion
in both the backstroke races, Ger-
ry Holan, winner in the 200 yard
breastroke, and Bob Clotworthy,
top diver in both low and high
board events, who were the back-
bone of Ohio's drive to its fifth
straight natatorial crown.
Michigan, forced to rely on
seconds and thirds, was the vic-
tim of stellar performances by
swimmers from other schools.
These cut deeply into the Wol-
verines' point total.
Keith Peterson of Northwestern
was a definite surprise, capturing
the 50 and 100 yard freestyle
events. Another surprise was Bum-
py Jones' victory over the great
Konno in the 220 yard freestyle.
.* * *
KONNO came down with a case
of the mumps on the last day of
the meet, following by two weeks
the illness of his roommate Dick
Cleveland with the same malady.
Clotworthy reigned supreme in
'the diving, but last year's low
board champ, Morley Shapiro of
Ohio State, finished second in
the one meter and a dissappoint-
ing sixth in the three meter
event.
The rise of Michigan's sopho-
more diver Jimmy Walters con-
tinues to amaze Wolverine sports

ageous performance of the meet
Wolverine Grant Scruuggs would
have been a shoo-in.
Scruggs had injured a tendon
in his leg almost two weeks ago,
but it had failed to respond to
treatment and remained in-
flamed,
Friday night he ran two fine
races toreach Saturday's finals.
In his first preliminary the soph-
omore speedster found himself
boxed in running way back ap-
proaching the final turn, but he
broke loose and with a concentrat-
ed burst of speed movedup to
qualify.
* * *
THOUGH TRAINER Len Pad-
dock worked hard on his foot after
the race, by Saturday morning it
was stiff and painful to walk on,
but he insisted on running and
with another dramatic finish, aft-
er running dead last till the final
turn he finished strongly to take
third.
The Wolverine mile relay quar-
tet of Al Rankin, Bill Barton, Dan
Hickthan, and Jack Carroll set a
new Michigan varsity mark of
3:18.5 in winning their event. Car-
roll, running the anchor leg, re-
ceived the baton slightly after Ben
Youtsey of Purdue, but immediate-
ly took command of the situation
and won by five yards.
The Wolverines may look with
some degree of relief to next year's
meet. Seniors on the Illinois team
accounted for 22 of their points,
while Wolverine seniors accounted
for only 9'/2 points.
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Chicago (N) 10, Cleveland (A) 4
New York (N) 16, Chicago (A) 14
New York (A) 2, Boston (A) 0
Cincinnati "B" (N) 8, Philadelphia
"B" (N) 0
Washington 11, Cincinnati 5
Boston (N) 7, St. Louis (N) 7
St. Louis (A) 7, Los Angeles (PCL)
(6)

By DICK LEWIS
Sophomore center Paul Grotf-
sky rose out of the disaster that
means a third straight losing sea-
son for a Michigan basketball team
to emerge as the squad's leading
scorer and the first Wolverine
cager to surpass 300 points in re-
cent years.
Lofty Leo Vanderkuy was the
last Wolverine to turn that trick,
doing so with a 329-point effort
in 1950-51. Groffsky, the Maple-
wood, New Jersey, hookshot artist,
rattled the nets for 106 field goals
in 308 attempts and 89 free throws
for a 301-point total.
HIS FANCY shooting percent-
age of .344 also paced the Maize
and Blue quintet.
Groffsky's scoring prowess, to-
gether with that of six other
teammates who found the range
for 100 points or more on the
season, was just about the only
solace in the three win, 15 loss
Big Ten campaign.
These scintillating seven com-
bined for the bulk of Michigan's
1551 markers, highest total in
school history. The 70.5 average
per contest amassed by Coach Bill
Perigo's charges established an-
other varsity record.

SOPHOMORE guard Don Eaddy
ranked a close second to Groffsky,
pumping in 292 counters to add
to his freshman output of 181. The
restilting two-year aggregate of
473 gives Eaddy a good chance at
Awards
Basketball coach Bill Perigo
yesterday announced the fol-
lowing letter winners:
Bruce Allen, John Codwell,
Don Eaddy, Paul Groffsky,
Ralph Kauffman, Doug Lawr-
ence, Milt Mead, Ray Paviche-
vich and Bob Topp.
Reserve awards went to Ray
Kenaga, Leo Schlicht, Jerry
Stern and Gordon Tarrant.
Perigo also named nine men
for freshman numerals. These
are:
Jim Barron, John Cart-
wright, Tom Jorgensen, Gary
Morrison, Frank Moore, Dave
Parks, Tom Singer, Charles
Symmonds and John Vauter.
coming close to All-American
Mack Suprunowicz's four-year
total on the local hoop scene.
Jumping John Codwell fin-
ished a point ahead of 6-7 Milt

followers. From a non-qualifier in
1952 to third place in last week's
high board competition has been
the progress record of the Kenil-
worth, Illinois product. With Clot-
worthy graduating, the diving
throne of the Big Ten will be up-
for-grabs next year, and Walters
is sure to be around when the
champion is crowned.

play.
FINAL
Player
Groff sky
Eaddy
Codwell
Mead
Lawrence
Pavichevich
Kauffruan
Allen
Topp
Schlicht
Willian
Stern
Kenaga
Totals

G
22
22
22
22
21
22
22
18
13
1
3
5
29

FG FT Pts.
106 89 301
112 68 292
76 79 231
85 60 230
70 28 168
54 28 136
29 42 100
16 18' 50
4 12 20
4 1 9
4 0 8
2 0 4
0 2 2
562 427 1551

Ave.
13.'7
13.3
10.5
10.5
8.0
6.2
4.5
2.8
1.5
0.9
8.0
1.3
0.4
70.5

Mead in the Wolverine scoring
race. Mead has now collected
268 markers in two seasons.
Set-shooting Doug Lawrence
whistled through 168 scores,-most
of them long set shots, to runhis
career record to 332. For a guy who
was given little chance of making
the varsity by outspoken Ernie Mc-
Coy, Lawrence's record as a scorer
and a team leader rates top recog-
nition.
GLANCING DOWN the statis-
tics for the concluded cage year,
the 99 points Michigan meshed
against Purdue set a Field House
standard as well as going down in
the books as the third highest
score ever registered in Big Ten

CAGE STATISTICS

wolverine Icers Depart
For Colorado Springs

(Continued from Page 1)
In case Willard Ikola's groin
injury is not sufficiently healed,
Bill Lucier, who performed capably
last weekend will take over the
goal tending duties.
* * *
DESPITE TWO head injuries
suffered within the space of two
weeks, George Chin fired home
seven goals and netted seven as-
sists during Michigan's last three
hockey games to become the in-
dividual scoring leader for the
1952-53 season.
The fourteen points gave Chin
a total of 42 for the season, a
scant one point ahead of John
* * *

Matchefts who paced Wolverine
scorers most of the year.
The colorful wingman scored 18
goals, enough for him to also an-
nex the top position in the goal
scoring department.

J. Paul Sheedy* Switched to Wildroot Cream-Oil
Because He Flunked The Finger-Nail Test

F -

SCORING
G. Chin
J. Matchefts
D. Mullen
P. Cooney
D. Philpott
J. Haas
E. Keyes
J. McKennell
A. McClellan
R. Shave
T. Mascarin
B. Dunn
R. Martinson
L. Paloatto

STATISTICS
18 24 42
15 26 41
17 18 35
14 15 29
13 11 24
5 16 21
12 8 20
7 5 12
0 12 12
7 3 10
3 4 7
2 5 7
4 1 5
1 3 4

A
22
8
32
17
30
8
6
54
25
9
42
12
44

. -'
the haunt
of the
Baskervilles
oil
NCE there was a ghost named Leroy, who lived in a
haunted cottage near a large Eastern university. Every
Friday night, at exactly seven o'clock, he'd slide under the
door of Baskerville Hall (the main dorm), and give the
students all the answers to next week's quizzes.
This was quite a set up. No studying, no cramming . . and
straight A's all term long. But then, one Friday, the hour
came and went. No Leroy! And the following week, all the
Baskerville Boys got an F on every quiz!
The Friday after that, all of Baskerville Hal waited
and waited. But still no Leroy! In high dudgeon, they set out
to find him. Creeping into Leroy's haunted cottage ... the
Baskerville Boys found him--moaning and groaning. "What's
the matter, Leroy?" they asked.
Leroy wiped a ghostly tear from his ghostly eye. "The weath-
er's so hot, every time I put on a shirt the collar curls and
wilts. I haven't been out for two weeks!"
in high glee, the Baskerville Boys hurried to the local
Van Heusen dealer and bought a dozen Van Heusen Century
Shirts with the revolutionary soft collar that won't wrinkle
ever. 6 whites, 2 grays, 2 blue and 2 tan ... some with regular
cellars,'some with spread collars. At only $3.95 apiece, they
thought it was a very good investment.
Leroy was delighted. He rewarded the boys with all the
answers to the following week's quizzes. Two months later,
all the boys from Baskerville Hall had flunked out. Leroy's
good-looking Van Heusen Century Shirts made him so popular
with the co-eds, that he didn't have time for quizzes or answers.

Hero's a sad cotton tale: poor Paul was in a stew about his hare until his paw
wrote: "I ear you got a bun on because your girl left you. Now, lettuce look at
the bre'r facts. To get in on the bunny huggin', smart rabbits foot it down to
any toilet goods counter for Wildroot Cream-Oil, America's
biggest-selling hare tonic. So fuzz thing tomorrow, invest 29t
in a bottle or handy tube. Contains soothing Lanolin. Non-
alcholic. Grooms the hare. Relieves annoying dryness. Re-
moves loose, ugly dandruff. Helps you pass the Finger-Nail
Test." Sheedy tried Wildroot Cream-Oil and now he's a jump
ahead of every Tom, Dick and Harvey. So what're you wait-
ing fur? Get Wildroot Cream-Oil today, and ask for Wildroot OTM
at your barber's. You're bound to like it! I[uYSNFs$
* of 131 So. Harris Hill Rd., Williamsville, N.Y.
Widroot Company, Inc., Buffalo 11, N. Y. -i
I ~,7r'flmt~iy rfl7777

W!

Take a university-sponsored
tour via TWA this summer
and earn full college credit
while you travel
Visit the countres of your choice
... study from 2 to 6 weeks at a
foreign university. You cari do both
on one trip when you arrange a un-
versity-sponsored tour via TWA.
Itineraries include countries in

r

M

-11

I

STORE HOURS DAILY 9 TO 5:30

VAN HEUSEN
Cenhir Shirts

I I

li

Ii

I

I1

. CaiC t'It1l

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan