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March 05, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-05

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 1953

I

FORCEPS, MAKEUP
'U' Doctors Favor Use
Of Video at Operations

By HELENE SIMON 1
Moving the television camera
into the operating room would be
of great value both to medical men
and lay people, University doctors
of the surgery department said
yesterday.
The Medical School professors
were commenting on the Univers-
ity of Pennsylvania's statement
that natural color television is en-
abling it to provide more thorough
instruction in surgery for medical
students.
DR. REED Nesbit of the sur-
gery department believes, how-
ever, television instruction of op-
eration technique would be of
greater benefit to post graduate
medical students and practicing
IFC Tryouts
To MeetToday
A meeting for Interfraternity
Council tryouts will be held at 5
p.m. today in Rm. 3-B of the Un-
ion.
The meeting, open to all fra-
ternity men and pledges, will be
the start of a six-week orienta-
tion period for men interested in
the IFC.
Pete Thorpe, '53, IFC president
will speak on the organization and
work of the IFC and will answer
any questions.
During the six-week training
program, the tryouts will work
one afternoon a week in the IFC
office. They will help with the
routine office work such as mail-
ing, clipping and filing. After the
six-week period the tryouts will
be interviewed by the senior of-
ficers and will be assigned to
committees.
IFC committees include the
rushing, scholarship, public rela-
tions, Big Ten human relations,
coordinating and social commit-
tees.
In their sophomore year, IFC
workers become eligible for assist-
ant chairmanships, in their junior
year for chairmanships, and in
their senior year they may run for
senior offices.
Deferral Test
DeadlineSet
National selective service head-
quarters issued a reminder to col-
lege students that applications for
the April 23 selective service qual-
ification test must be postmarked
not later than midnight Monday.
Applications may be obtained
from Ann Arbor Board No. 85, 208
W. Washington.
To be eligible to take the test
an applicant, on the testing date
(1) must be a selective service
registrant who intends to request
deferment as a student; (2) must
be satisfactorily pursuing a college
course leading to a degree and (3)
must not have taken the test pre-
viously.
Poetry Meeting
To Hear Barrows
Prof. Herbert Barrows of the
English department will address
the Modern -Poetry Club on the
works of English poet Gerard Man-
ley Hopkins at 8:30 p.m. today in
Rm. A of the League.

physicians than to undergraduate
students.
"Undergraduate students are
mostly taught principles, but
post graduate students are in-
terested more in techniques
which could be effectively dem-
onstrated on television," Dr.
Nesbit said.
He also pointed out that
the television broadcasts would be
helpful at medical meetings where
doctors could get the opportunity
to see close up views of new tech-
niques in surgery.
According to Prof. Carl Badgley
of the surgery department, the
Post Graduate Medical Society of
Michigan is planning medical pro-
cedure broadcasts on a closed cir-
cuit to doctors in Detroit.
"One .of the greater values of
medical television programs lies
in the instruction of disease pre-
vention for lay people," Dr.
Badgley commented.
Deformities in children could be
more easily curbed by means of
visual education, he explained.
If parents could see via televi-
sion a child who shows symptoms
of deformity they would become
aware of similar symptoms in their
own children and give them medi-
cal care to prevent deformities,
he said.
Although there are no imme-
diate plans for installing television
equipment in University Hospital's
present operating rooms, Dr. Nes-
bit thought it would be a good idea
to put television in the operating
suites when they are rebuilt.
Silicone Used
In Reduction
of LungFroth
Clinical experiments for the
control of the dangerous "foamy
froth" condition which sometimes
occurs in pulmonary edema, or
"fluid of the lungs," are being car-
ried on at the University, Prof.
Mark Nickerson of the pharmo-
cology department revealed yes-
terday.
The control compound, which is
not produced in nature, is called
"silicone," made up of silicon and
oxygen.
- * *
PULMONARY EDEMA is the re-
sult of a disease which causes a
frothy fluid to accumulate in the
lungs preventing breathing. In
such cases, Dr. Nickerson explain-
ed, death may occur from internal
drowning.
Inhaling silicone reduces the
froth to a liquid again and frees
the lungs for breathing, he said.
University researchers say that
treatment with silicones has prov-
ed to be much more effective than
other known methods to control
pulmonary edema. However, Dr.
Nickerson added, "We still do not
know how effective it will be on
humans."
The chemical compound has
not been released yet for public
use, and is only available where
Dr. Nickerson and his associates
administer it for experimental
purposes.
The discovery was recently re-
ported before a meeting of the
Pharmocological Society by Char-
les F. Curry, laboratory technician
at the University, who assisted in
the investigations.

Epstein Says
Ads Reflect
Public Taste
Contemporary culture must be
blamed for insipid, immoral and
infantile advertisements, accord-
ing to public relations executive
Joseph Epstein.
"Advertising reflects the reading
audience's demands," he explained.
Epstein, former city editor of The
Daily and present partner in a
New Orleans advertising agency,
delivered the second Journalism
lecture of the semester yesterday.
DEFINING advertising as, "an
art of persuasion in the sale of
ideas or merchandise by any other
means except direct contact," Ep-
stein said the medium included
everything from sky writing and
bill boards to conventional radio
and television commercials.
In attempting to influence a
broad audience, the advertiser
tends to be slightly misleading,
but this happens in any sort of
communication, he pointed out.
An objective view is necessary
however, because the buyer tends
to beware when advertisements
are too misleading; Epstein added.
"Complete objectivity in news
reporting is almost impossible, be-
cause every writer includes his
own viewpoint in his writing," he
said. "In advertising, the copy
writer also includes his own view
and he must try to appeal to the
largest possible audience."
DRAWING ANOTHER compari-
son between news writing and ad-
vertising, Epstein said that re-
porters can't be truly creative be-
cause they are bound by rules and
style, but the copy writer can be
as imaginative and, creative as he
knows how.
"Big news is made by the un-
usual and often the unhappy as-
pects of life, but good advertis-
ments deal with normal events
and therefore need to be more
interesting to attract readers.
Because advertising is a difficult
field to get started in, Epstein
encouraged interested students to
take the annual advertising test
to help them find their most suit-
able place in the field.
ISA Chooses
New Off icers
Sigurd Dulz, Grad., was elected
president of the International Stu-
dents Association at the initial
meeting of the House of Repre-
sentatives this week.
Others elected were Shigeo Im-
amura, Spec., vice president; Tur-
ker Karanizrak, '55E, treasurer;
and Amnuay Viravan, '54BAd., ac-
tivities chairman. Edouard Plan-
chon, '54, was elected secretary,
but his resignation earlier this
week leaves that post vacant.
Students Receive
'U' Scholarships
Eight architecture college stu-
dents have been awarded Univer-
sity Tuition Scholarships for the
current semester it has been an-
nounced.
The recipients are: John E.
Flynn, '53A, Erfan Hashen, Grad.,
James K. Meacham, '53A, Roger
W. Peters, '55A, Melvin H. Sachs,
'54A, Dennis C. Schmeideke, '54A,
Charles W. Scurlock, '53A and
Jack Lardis, '55A.

Taking of a' Toast and Tea

Through preventive medicine
the public health movement has
saved untold numbers of lives, Dr.
John D. Morley of the School of
Public Health said last night.
In a talk before a group of pre-
med students, he pointed out that
the basic aim of public health is
one of education.
* * *
DR. MORLEY gave the four
phases of the present movement
as the promotion of universal san-
itary conditions, the organized
control of communicable diseases,
the education of the individual in
the area of personal hygiene and
the organization of medical ser-
vices for quick and accurate diag-
nosis of diseases.
Defining public health as the
promotion of health "through
organized . community work,"
Dr. Morley traced its history
from its inception about 100
years ago up to today.

OUNCE OF PREVENTION:
Morley Cites Education,
As Aim of Public Health

He said that before the rise of
scientific knowledge, there was no
concept of preventive medicine,
only curative medicine which was
a personal affair between doctor
and patient. However, he added,
the rise of science was accom-
panied by a humanitarian move-
ment which fostered the idea of
public health.

s4

B I o -)lo x~

f u eo

flk
f "

r " " "r
D0of
IN "HUNTING RIDGE"TWEED

,. .

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
ORGANIZED SOBRIETY-Local members of the National Prohibition Party held their annual
tea in a back room of a local tavern, and mapped out plans for approaching elections. Undaunted
by lack of Student Affairs Office recognition (there is no record of such a group having been
organized on campus in the past) the Young Prohibitionists continue their educatiopal program.

I

I

DRINK CHUG-A-LUG:
State Alcholism Board Delays
Renewal of Research Grant
The State Board of Alcoholism was still pondering a request
yesterday by Dr. H. M. Pollard, professor of internal medicine, for
funds to continue research work on alcoholism and $30,000 for a
proposed out-patient clinic.
Dr. Pollard asked for a continuation of an annual grant of $6,750
effective July 1, 1952 for an investigatory program on the effects of
alcohol on the intestinal tract and on digestion, nutrition and appetite.

r

"Our information is not corre-t
lated and we want to get a signi-
ficantly large number of cases'
first," he explained.
* * *
COMMENTING on the $30,000
request to establish an out-patient
clinic in alcoholism at University
Hospital, Dr. Pollard said that the
original proposal asking that the
University and Washtenaw Coun-
ty match State funds should be
abandoned.
The Board was reported to have
told Dr. Pollard that it would
view the request for funds sym-
pathetically, but needed more de-
tails about the budget for the pro-
posed clinic.

ii

STUDENT
SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS
REPAIRED
'RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT
Fountain Pens repaired by
a factory trained man.
Webster-Chicago
Tape and Wire Recorders
MOR RI 7LS
314 S. State Ph. 7171

-

fII

A

WE RE-OPENED

"Dollars for Sense"

MARCH 1

and would appreciate the patronage
of our old customers.

the (amipaign

to help keep Adlai

Stevensoni

in a

TUESDAY thru SATURDAY 4-10
SUNDAYS 11-10

0'
r--

'at
Xd Cajoa

FLOWERS are in order for
ASSEMBLY BALL
ORCHID SPECIAL - $2.75
Campus Corsage Service
Phone 3-1824 7-11 P.M.
Special Student Prices thru Thursday Only
o o o0

FARM CUPBOARD
5400 Plymouth Rd. - Ph. 9387
READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
ONE STOP at
Packard Laundry
takes care of all 3:
and fast!

I

position of leadership, needs your sledges and con-
tributions. To contribute to "Dollars For Sense" or
obtain information about the plan, contact one of us.
We are ready to help you help Stevenson continue to

"ftalk sense to the American People."

Arthur Newell
(W. Quad)

for the best
SPAGHETTI
and RAVIOLI
in town.
Ia C~
122 W. Washington
BEER * WINE * SANDWICHES
Even if you can't translate
, . a la recherche
d/u temp s perdlit"
YOU CAN STILL
LEARN SHORTHAND
IN ONE WEEK
SWIFTHAND, 'the 20th century
shorthand," has eliminated the
complicated symbols and memory
workouts of old fashioned short-

Dave Tice
(W. Quad)

M

tm-,

I

I

|I

We Have Everything
in the way of career opportunities
We will continue our additional training throughout March
in preparation for our summer business. If you are interested
in work that is interesting, pleasant, and profitable, investi-
gate immediately in the possibility of a position for yout
For those of you who have had PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE,

G
J t
Te) .
U

'(rq
t

LAUNDRY
'/2-Hour Serrice
Using Maytag Automatic Washers . . .
that wash clothes really clean! Serve
yourself, WASH & DRY-in less than 1
hour. No risk of damage to your daintiest
washables.
DRY CLEANING
10% Discount
Cash and carry discount for expert, guar-
anteed work by Michigan Dry Clean-
ers Co.

Charles Benzinger
(E. Quad)
Joan Bewick
(E. Quad) ,
Ralph Goldberg
(E. Quad)

Barbara Fairberg
(602 Lawrence)
Lee Koplow
(Alpha Epsilon Phi)
Dorothy Faber
(Cousins Hall)
Fred Berthal
(Michigan House)
Ed Hubble
(Michigan House)
Natilie Gold
(Sigma Delta Tau)
Joan Allen
(Kappa Alpha Theta)
Ann Young
(Kappa Kappa Gamma)

Rosalie Mandell
(1027 E. Univ.)
Marge Shepard
(1015 E. Univ.)
Will Hansen
(Nakamura House)
Ellen Dodge
(Martha Cook)
Martin Packard
(Law Quad)
Ellie Rosenthal
(Barbour)
Fran Leffler
(Newberry)
Judy Bender
(Osterweil)

Lester Zane
(S Quad)
Lyle Parr
(S. Quad)

S

I

Herb Cohn
(S. Quad)

SHIRT SERVICE

All

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