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February 22, 1952 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-02-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1952

Something's Fishy

Astrologer's Claims Draw Laughs
From 'U' Astronomy Professors

SEVERAL members of the
astronomy department would not
even bother to refute the claims
of Iarry Gray, an astrologer who
recently came to Ann Arbor, that
"many economic and social events
can be linked in some way with
the dominance of the stars."
When pressed for a statement,
however, Prof. Dean B. Mc-
Laughlin of the astronomy de-

partment said, "if people were
dopes enough to believe it there
was no use in refuting it." The
answers to those genuinely puz-
zled by astrology would be simp-
ly the study of astronomy, Prof
McLaughlin said.
While some of the astronomers
considered astrology too unim-
portant to comment on, others
agreed that "there was nothing
like having a good laugh over its
claims."
Prof. Kenneth E. Boulding of
the economics department chuck-
led over Gray's accounting for
the economic panic of the early
'30's as being due to the presence
of the planet Pluto. "The planets
affect economic events as readily
as these events affect the plan-
ets", Boulding said.
Adding that astrology was a
pseudo-science with no empirical
basis, Boulding said that he could
not recall any astrologers swho
belonged to the American Econ-
nomics Association.

But the University community
has had only a few cases so far
this year, according to Dr. Wil-
liam Brace of Health Service. Stu-
dents here generally are only sus-
ceptible to German measles, he
said, since most have had red
measles in their childhood.
German measles, he pointed
out, only last one or two days and
are not very severe.
Physicians have a serum-im-
mune serum globulin-to modify
or prevent red measles but the
Department said success depends
upon knowing the approximate
time of exposure. The serum is
not effective on German measles.

GOLDFISH PSYCHOLOGY-Joyce Gammon, Pomona College
senior, practicing her psychology. lessons at home, decided to try
her knowledge of response patterns on Herman, her pet goldfish.
Now when she hangs the ring in the water, Herman swims
through it to reach his tasty reward.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

5 P.M.

SWORLD I
NEWS
"DEATH OF A
SALESMAN~

An Intimtate Theatre
Bringing Cinema Triumphs
From All Nations

STARTING TODAY - THROUGH SUNDAY
.MI RHtAOHE
Os$ M$u *f CORK WIM
NINA FOC M -GEORGE COULOURIS
Sera Pay by Sidney SOchman . Direeted by CHARLES VIDOR
Colvmbu. Repri

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assunes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (11
a.m. on Saturday).
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1952
VOL. LXIV, NO. 95
Notices
Regents' Rules Governing Motor
Vehicles by students. 'No student in
attendance at the University shall op-
erate any motor vehicle.. In exception-
al and extraordinary cases, at the dis-
cretion of the Dean of Students, this
rule may be relaxed." The regula-
tion governs the use of a car as well
as the operation of one; consequently,
it is not permissible for a student to
use his car or his family's car for so-
cial, personal, or other purposes when
the car is driven by any person who is
not a member of his immediate family.
Any act of driving without first secur-
ing permission from the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs will constitute grounds
for disciplinary action.
Students may apply for exemption
from the ruling by calling, in person,
at the Office of Student Affairs, 1020
Administration Building, and by giv-
ing complete information on their
cars. Only the following students may
apply for exemption:
a)gThose who are twenty-six years
of age or older.
b) Those who have a faculty rating
of teaching fellow or higher. It is to
be emphasized that exemption is not
granted automatically but is given
only upon personal request.
All other student drivers must re-
port to the Office of Student Affairs
where they may petition for special
permits which will enable them to use
their cars for purposes which are
deemed absolutely necessary
Eligibility. Any regularly enrolled
student is eligible to participate in non-
athletic extracurricularactivities pro-
vided he Is not on academic discipline.
Students who have received notice
of academic discipline (notification,
warning, probation, action pending)
are accordingly ineligible to participate
in activities. A student who has re-
ceived notice of academic discipline
for the current semester and who is
participating in activities which fall
within the eligibility rules should im-
mediately notify the chairman of his
activity in writing of his resignation
from that activity. A copy of such
notification should be sent to the Of-
fice of Student Affairs, 1020 Admnis-
tration Building. Activities faling
within the eligibility rules include:
a) Participation in public perform,
ances which are sponsored by student
organizations and which require group
rehearsals. Examples Union Opera,
Junior Girls' Play; productions of Gil-
bert and Sullivan Society, Student
Players, Inter-Arts Union; performances
of Arts Chorale, Glee Clubs, and Band
(for students not enrolled in band
courses).
b) Staff members of student publi-
cations. Examples: Daily, Gargoyle,
Michiganensian, Technic, Generation.
e) Officers and chairmen of standing
committees in student organizations,
including house groups. This includes
positions in house groups such as so-
cial, rushing, personnel, and pubica-
tion chairmen, house managers, and
stewards.
d) Class officers or candidates for
such office.
e) Members and candidates for mem-
bership in student government groups.
Examples: Student Legislature, Judi-
ciary Councils, Interfraternity Council,
Panhellenic Board, Assembly Board,
Association of Independent Men, In-
terco-operative Council, League and
Union student government groups, En-
gineering Council, Music School As-
sembly, Business Administration Coun-
cil.
Irw-~ri

f) Committee members for major
campus projects and dances. Examples:
Michigras, Winter Carnival, League
committees, Frosh week end, Sopho-
more Cabaret, Assembly Ball, Interfra-
ternity Council B a 11, Homecoming
Dance, Senior Ball, J-Hop.
g) Representatives to off-campus con-
ferences.
Fellowships and Assistantships: The
Merrill-Palmer School, Detroit, Michi-
gan, announces graduate assistantships
and fellowships for the year 1952-53,
in the following fields: family life,
psychology, physical growth, research,
infant laboratory, and nursing.
The Department of Physics and As-
tronomy, The Ohio State University,
Columbus, Ohio, announces graduate
assistantships, fellowships and assist-
ant instructorships for the year 1952-
53 in the fields of physics and as-
tronomy.
For further information call at 3523
Administration Building or phone Uni-
versity extension 2614.
Personnel Interviews
The Inland Steel Company of Indiana
will be on campus Mon., Feb. 25 to in-
terview students for their Management
Trainee positions as well as Account-
ants.
The Connecticut General Life Insur-
ance Company of Hartford, Conn., will
have a representative on the campus
Tues., Feb. 26 Students graduating in
June who are interested in this line
of work are eligible to see the repre-
sentative. Men will be trained for
technical, administrative and executive
positions.
Procter and Gamble Company of Cin-
cinnati, Ohio will be on the campus
Tues., Feb. 26, to interview men gradu-
ating in June who are interested in
the Buying Department of this firm.
Men with either technical or non-
technical backgrounds are eligible.
Personnel Requests
The Chase National Bank of New
York has openings in their Training
Program. Application blanks are avail-
able for men graduating in June who
are interested Jn commercial banking.
For appointments, detailed informa-
tion, and applicatoss contact the Bu-
reau of Appointments, 3528 Adminis-
tration Building, Ext. 371.
Lectures
University Lecture, auspices of the
Phoenix Project. "The Krebs Cycle in
Plants," (illustrated), Dr. George C.
L'atles, California Institute of Tech-
nology. 4:15 p.m., Fri., Feb. 22, Rack-
ham Amphitheater. Dr. Laties has been
associated with several universities in
this country and England, and is at
present engaged in plant physiological
research at the C.I.T.
University Lecture, auspices of the
Department of Biological Chemistry.
"The Biosynthesis of Steroid Hor-
mones." Dr. William J. Haines, The
Upjohn Company, Kalamazoo, 10:30
a.m., Sat., Feb. 23, Rackham, Amphi-
theater.
University Lecture: auspices Phoenix
Project, Dr. John C. Bugher will speak
on "The Program of the Atomic En-
ergy Commission in Biology and Medi-
cine," at 4:15 p.m., Mon., Feb. 25,
Rackham Amphitheater. Dr. Bugher
will discuss the programmatic and non-
programmatic research of the Com-
mission, and will cover such topics as
radiation therapy, radiation damage,
genetics and growth.
Academic Notices
LS & A Students: No courses may
be added to your original elections aft-
er Fri., Feb. 22.
Psychology Colloquium. Fri., Feb. 22,
4:15 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall. Dr.
Ronald Lippitt, of the Research Center
for Group Dynamics, will speak on
"Replication of a Field Study on Social
Influence."
History Make-up Examinations. Sat.,
Mar. 1, 9-12, 2016 A. H. You must ob-
tain written permission from your in-
structor, and then sign list in History
Office.
Law School Admission Test: Candi-

dates taking the Law School Admission
Test, February 23, are requested to re-
port to 100 Hutchins Hall at 8:45 a.m.,
Sat. The session will last until 1 p.m.
Concerts
Student Recital: Beverly Spera,
School of Music senior, will present a
program at 8:30 Sunday evening, Feb-
ruary 24, in the Architecture Auditor-
ium, in partial fulfillment of the re-
quirements for the Bachelor of Music
degree in Collective Strings. Her ma-
jor instrument is the Double Bass,
which she studies with Clyde Thomp-
son. The recital will include works by
Vivaldi, Honegger and Dvorak, and will
be open to the public.
Events T odayv
Canterbury Club: Canterbury House
Tea, 4 p.m. All Episcopal students
and their friends are invited.
S.R.A. Coffee Hour, Lane Hall, 4:30-6
p.m. Guest: Miss Barbara S. Grant,
College Secretary for the American
Friends Service Committee. Al stu-
dents welcome.
The Co-Hop: sponsored by Inter-
Cooperative Council. 9-12 midnight,
Lane Hall. Movies, square dancing and
refreshments. All students are invited.
Motion Pictures, auspices of the Uni-
versity Museums. "Cell-Structural
Unit of Life,"'"Cells and their Func-
tions," and "Life in, a Drop of Water."
7:30 p.m., Fri., Feb. 22, Kellogg Audi-
torium.
Displaced Students Committee: Meet-
ing, 3:30 p.m., Lane Hall. Plans for
next year will be discussed.
Newman Club. Mardi Gras party,
8-12 midnight. Recreation room, Saint
Mary's Chapel. Entertainment: comedy
skits, musical renditions, square and
round dancing. Refreshment. All
Catholic students and their friends are
invited.
Coming Events
Opportunities in Social Work. The
School of Social Work announces an
open meeting on Opportunities in So-
cial Work to be held at the League,
Mon., Feb. 25, 7 p.m. (Room number'
will be posted on the bulletin board).
The Faculty pf the School of Social
Work will discuss informally the vari-
ous social welfare programs, the need
for trained social work personnel and
conditions of employment in the field.
The meeting is primarily for under-
graduates who are interested in en-
tering Social Work.
Graduate Outing Club will meet in
the rear of the Rackham Bldg., 2 p.m.,
Sun., Feb. 24.
Annual Brotherhood Dinner, Lane
(Continued on Page 4)

Children's
Concert Will
Go on Today
Rural school children of Wash-
tenaw county will be the guests
at a special concert by the 72-
piece Ann Arbor Civic Symphony
Orchestra at 1:30 p.m. today in
Hill Auditorium.
Orien Dalley, music director of
radio station WUOM and lecturer
in the music school and Exten-
sion Services, will conduct the
concert.
The entire seating capacity of
Hill Auditorium has been assigned
to schools of the area. For many
of the students it will be the first
symphony concert.
To acquaint the children with
the make-up of an orchestra, the
instruments will be introduced by
the section leaders of the sym-
phony.
The program will include works
by Chadwick, Johann Strauss,
Dvorak, Sammartini, Brahms and
Sousa. Mrs. Janice R. Cobb, of
the music school, will lead the
group in six songs to conclude the
concert.
Science Finds
Cheap New
'Drug for TB
NEW YORK--(P)-A cheap new
drug-costing maybe only a nickel
a day-is the newest white hope
against dread tuberculosis-the
White Plague.
The pills swallowed by some
bed-ridden, "hopeless" patients
have knocked out their fevers, put
20 to 30 pounds on wasted bodies,
made them feel so good'they try
to hop out of bed against orders.
BUT THE pill definitely can't
be called a cure for TB, still the
biggest infectious killer of Ameri-
cans, TB experts warned in telling
of the new drug yesterday.
They said it will be four to
six months before it's known
whether the good effects last,
and whether the TB germs are
able to fight back.
Though tried on more than 200
humans so far, it won't be avail-
able generally until probably May
or June, after approal first from
the Food and Drug Administra-
tion.
But then the drug could be
made in huge amounts. It might
cost from five to 50 cents a day
for daily doses, one drug house
official guessed.
IT'S MADE from a chemical re-
lated to a B vitamin. Coal tars
supply the raw materials.
In fantastic coincidence, the
drug was discovered by two phar-
maceutical houses, unbeknownst
to each other, during tests of
thousands of chemicals. Only last
Jan. 8 did they learn they both
had the same thing, with doctors
testing it. The drug first was
made 40 years ago, in Germany,
but nothing had ever been done
with it.
Hillel Speaker
The Rev. DeWitt Baldwin, di-
rector of Lane Hall and the SRA,
will speak on a brotherhood theme

today following the regular Fri-
day night Hillel service.
Beginning at 7:45 p.m., the
service will be held in Lane Hall.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 ,3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
LOST AND FOUND
REWARD-Gray Parker 51 pencil, cap
missing. Lost vicinity of 3 Tap. Hall.
597 Jordan. 31561. , )8L
LOST-MEN'S WRISTWATCH, Girard-
Perregaux. Self-winding. Between
Liberty and William on Maynard,
about 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 6.
Reward. Call Chuck Elliott, Michi-
gan Daily, 23241. )1L
REWARD-History 93 notes lost.
A.M.H. Jan. 28. Call 21433 Eve. Gil
Lizich. )7L
WRONG gray gabardine coat taken from
Gingham Inn Fri. or Sat. night. Party
picking up coat call Al Logelin,
2-9318. )10L
EYEGLASS CASE - Lost Angell Hall
Feb. 13. Reward. Notify Barbara Wil-
son, 8983. )19
LOST-Manila folder with bassoon mu-
sic, including Don Juan, Homer Kel-
ler Sonata, Poulenc Trio. 6978. )12L
LOST-Girl's Bulova Watch in vicinity
of Cousins Hal. Reward-one carton
of, cigarettes. 2-8865. )11L
FOR SALE
LEICA CAMERA, with coated Summi-
tar F 2 lens with filter and coated
Elmar F 3.5 lens with filter. Any rea-
sonable offer, after 6:30 p.m., Phil
Zussman, 30521, Ext. 270. )14
TWO TABLE RADIOS, jacks for L-P.
Have had light use: Arvin AC-DC
Portale; 8 tube Hifidelity (8" speak-
er) 30521, Ext. 790. )15
TUX, 6 business suits, sport coat (size
38 & 40), various golf lubs, Bruns-
wick bowling ball. Call 1221 Chicago
House. 24401. )16
1951 FORD OVERDRIVE
CUSTOM V-8 TUDOR
fully equipped, 7,000 miles.
$1795. Phone 27559
MICHIGAN MEN WANTED!' -- WHO
LIKE BARGAINS. Briefs & under-
shirts-35o-3 for $1.00. White "T,,
shirts (navy type)-39c ea. Gabardine
dress pants-$5.49. Sam's Store, 122
E. Washington. )18
FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE furnished apartment. 5
rooms, private bath. Studio apart-
ment, entire 3rd floor. Suitable for
Graduate students. Phone 5201. )5F
ROOMS FOR RENT
WANTED-Young woman to share at-
tractive apartment near campus. All
facilities, $32.00 a month. Call 3-0425
between 5-8 p.m. )17R
CAMBRIDGE 1430-Single or double for
men, private shower, lots of closets,
quiet home. )13R

HANDSOME or not, do not worry.
You speak English, don't you?
The field is still yours.
More tomorrow.

SINGLE ROOMS for men, 1346 Geddes
Ave. 2-7044. )14R
ONE ROOM for male student. 509 Wal-
nut, phone 30807. Close to campus-
arrange terms. )15R
DOUBLE ROOM, kitchen. privileges.
6161 W. Madison. Call after 5:30. 7398.
)lla
2-2-ROOM suites, suitable for 2, 3, or
4 people. On campus, 20542. )1OR
ROOMS for men who would like a quiet
place to live. Fraternity section.
1402 Hill St., call after 5:30. )93
STUDENTS interested in boarding at
fraternity call 2-9431. )1X
CAMPUS Tourist home-Rooms by day
or week. Bath, shower, television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )5R
DOUBLE ROOMS - Half block from
campus. Linen furnished, gas heat,
hot water, quiet and convenient. 417
E. Liberty. )4R
BOARDING-Meals taken, arranged as
desired. Convenient, reasonable, e's
cellent home-cooking. Call 6641 eve-
nings. )lx
LARGE DOUBLE for men, cooking fa-
cilities, linen furnished. Student
landlord. Call 2-7862. )3R
APT. HUNTING? Try Apt, finding ser-
vice at' the Campus Tourist Home,
Families welcome. Cook Priv. 518 E.
Williams. 3-8454.
PERSONAL

J

WANTED-1 female as partner for mili-
tary ball and banquet. Application
deadline Sunday. Transportation --
Olds convertible. Phone 3-1511, Ext.
2760; 8565 evenings-ask for Jack.
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING-REASONABLE RATES. AC-
CURATE & EFFICIENT. Phone 7590,
830 S. Main. lB
TYPING-REASONABLE RATES. AC-
CURATE & EFFICIENT. Phone 7590,
830 S. Main. )1B
MISCELLANEOUS
SINGING AND SPEECH DEVELOP-
MENT. Doctor Kenneth N. Wester-
man. Member of the Research Coin-
mittee Nat. Association Teachers of
Singing. Phone 6584. )15M
BOARD for women. North side cam-
pus. Call Joyce Gendzwill, 21017.
)13M
MEALS at Fraternity House, good food,
reasonable prices. Call 28312. )6M
SPECIAL February rates for ALL: 40
wks. of Colliers-$3. 30 mos. of Wom-
an's Home Com.-$4. Hurry, Hurryl
Student Periodical Agency, 6007, )2M
FOR (Beauty Counselors Cosmetics)
creams, colognes, soap, etc. for both
men & women, Phone 2-5152. )5M
WANTED TO BUY
LADIES second hand, inexpensive bike.
Call Shirley Josepher 2-2591. )13

A'

ROOMS FOR RENT

.4

i

)59

CLASSIFIEDS

PHOTOS
COPIED

READ

and
USE

20

for$10

Daily

DeLuxe Wallet-size Prints
Send any size photo or negative
No Proofs . . . Original returned
IDEAL FOR COLLEGE, ROTC, OR
JOB APPLICATIONS
FEDERAL WALLET-SIZE -
PHOTO Co.
P.O. Box 2448 Dept. C-7
Kansas City 6, Mo.
(No COD's Please)

I
f.1

Class ifieds

I1

U

ft

CINIs GIJJL)
and THE RIFLE CLUB
PRESENT
The Kaufman-Harb Laugh Riot
YOU CAN'T
TAKE IT WITH
YOU

ENDING 44c
TODAY Until
5 P.M.
S. at ttw
Also Cartoon - News - Novelty
Saturday
JAMES STEWART in "BEND OF THE RIVER"

P
to,",

Tomorrow

Tonight and

Patricia Skinner,

I

in

The Student Player's Production
of

Step -Right In...
S..and

O

by MAXWELL ANDERSON

"Theatrically, the play moves very well . . . con
oels interest with . . . effectiveness."

L

I

IEHIUV1

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