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February 16, 1952 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-02-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ I U r

Professor

Cites Betting
As Natural'
By TOM ARP
Igalized gambling got a boost
yesterday as a University political
science professor declared that
"Since it is evidently human na-
ture to gamble in one way or an-
other, I can see no argument
against legalized gambling."
In light of the current contro-
versy over legal gambling, Prof. N.
Marbury Efimenco commented
that "Gambling is so deeply root-
ed in man's personal make-up
that laws cannot restrain it."
THE NATION-WIDE issue was
raised last fall when the Federal
government passed its Gambling
Tax Stamp Act. The act places
an annual tax of $50 on any
games of chance, regardless of
..............whether state or local laws out-
law gambling in their areas.
Many commentators believed
the law was a move on the gov-
ernment's part to openly con-
done the legalization of gamb-
ling.
One clause of the law states,
however, that the act in no way
interferes with the privilege of lo-
cal governments to declare gamb-
ling illegal.'
THE ESSENTIAL problem, ac-
cording to Prof. Efimenco, is why
"a few professionals, racketeers
left over from prohibition, should
enrich themselves - sometimes to
the extent of two billion dollars a
year-when the government could
collect and spend the money for
national welfare."
"Gambling is not by nature a
crime; it is only the social or
legal attitude of a culture that
makes it so," he said. "Outside
the U.S. there are national lot-
teries, run by the government,
in which tickets are sold on the
streets like newspapers."
"In these countries," he said,
"gambling is recognized as a pure-
ly personal problem, and the in-
dividual makes the decision whe-
ther or not he will gamble."
* * *
PROF. EFIMENCO suggested
that the U.S. might set up such a
system, converting gambling in-
to "a national institution, deriv-
ing benefits for all."
"Under such conditions," he
asserted, "the gambling instincts
of the people would be satisfied
in a legal way and the profes-
sional racketeer would be prac-
tically forced out of business."
This situation already exists in
Nevada, where the state govern-
ment has legalized gambling and
'collects tax revenue on all gamb-
ling operations.
In Reno, often called the cen-
ter of U.S. gambling, slot ma-
chines can be found lining the
walls of drug and grocery stores.
CO-ED:
Oldest College
Grad Hits 102
SANTA MONICA, Calif.-(JP)-
Mrs. Ella Osborn Adams, who be-
lieves she may be the nation's old-
est living college graduate, cele-
brated her 102nd birthday with a
new hair-do yesterday.
Mrs. Adams was graduated from
Kalamazoo College 81 years ago.
Born in New York State, she was
brought up on a farm near Grand
Rapids.
At 16 she was a school teach-
er with a $3 weekly salary. She
gave that up to enter Kalama-
zoo College in the fall of 1867.

She came to California after
her marriage to Henry Adams
in 1876.
Mrs. Adams has overcome a lot
of bad luck to reach the age of
102. At 89 she fractured a hip.
At 98 she underwent major sur-
gery. Last year she suffered a
slight stroke.
Her formula for longevity:
"Don't worry about people. Just
be interested in them."
''Announces,
TV Course's
Armchair classes by television
will be offered on the University
Television Hour over WJIM-TV,
channel six, at 1 p.m. every Sun-
day starting tomorrow.
The spring program will include
a fifteen weeks "Telecourse" in
political parties and a seven weeks
course in "Understanding. Num-
bers."
A second seven weeks course,
"Exploring the Universe: The
Solar System," taught by Prof.
Leo Goldberg, chairman of the
astronomy department, will start
April 20.

MAN EQUALS MAN:
Student Writes Play Score

* , *

By ALICE BOGDONOFF
Teaching actors to sing is not
always an easy tftk, composer
Robert Cogan, Grad., discovered.
Cogan's singing pupils are the
cast of the Arts Theater Club's
current play, "A Man Equals a
Man" by German playwright pert-
hold Brecht.
* * *
"MODERN MUSIC can be dif-
ficult to sing," Cogan explained,
"and my problem was to create
very simple, yet effective songs
which untrained actors could
sing."
In adition to incidental music,
Cogan has written individual
songs and a soldiers' drinking
song for the entire cast.
"Music is an integral part of
the play," Cogan pointed out.
"It is wonderful t9 do music for
a play in which music is so inte-
grated in the conception," he add-
ed. "Brecht calls for both the
songs and the incidental spots; I
think the music contributes to
make the play, which is physically
unrealistic, seem terrifyingly real."
* * *
THE STUDENT composer-con-
ductor further explained the func-
tion of the music in the Brecht
creation as helping to set the
mood and scene of the play. "We
also learn a lot about the charac-
ter as he sings," Cogan said, "and
see a character's complacent ac-
ceptance of a tragic situation."
Working with the cast during
rehearsals, Cogan discovered
many of the problems confront-
ing theatrical music composers.
"The chief difficulty is tim-
ing," he said, "especially when
the music must be recorded be-
fore the play reaches the final,
stages of rehearsal."
"However," the young musician
added, "I don't think any of the
difficulties involved can mar the
excitement of working on this
most wonderful play."
Helping to enhance the effect
of the music is the new sound sys-
tem at the Arts Theater Club.
The Brecht play, which is hav-
ing its American premier in Ann
Arbor, will run until Feb. 24.
Women's Loan

Navy Ready
For Russian.
Sub Threat
WASHINGTON - P) - Adm.
William M. Fechteler said last
night that although Soviet Russia
now has between 300 and 400 sub-
marines, the U.S. Navy is pre-
pared to meet the threat success-
fully "if it comes."
The chief of naval operations
emphasized, however, that en-
emy underseas attacks would not
be beaten off without early Am-
erican losses.
* * *
FECHTELER told the National
Geographic Society in a prepared
address that Germany entered
World War II with only 50 sub-
marines a n d came "periously
near" to winning through its U-
boat assaults on Allied shipping.
Many Russian submarines to-
day, he said, are better than the
most improved German design-
ed craft.
Accompanying Fechteler's ad-
dress, the Navy displayed a new
one-man helicopter, but said in a
statement that "This machine is
not contracted for or endorsed by
the Marine Corps or Navy."
The machine, nicknamed the
"Hoppi-copter," is designed to
lift and carry a fully armed
man. It slightly resembles a
small outboard motor attached
to a man's back, with a rotor
blade circling a foot above his
head.
The device was shown strapped
to the shoulders like a knapsack
on a model in Marine Corps field
uniform.
Union Plans
P-ool Tourney
Budding Willie Hoppes and
Johnny Mariuccis will have their
big opportunity when the Union
all-campus pool, billiard and ping
pong tournaments begin Feb. 25.
Entry lists for the three event
race will be in the Union Pool
Room until Feb. 22 for interested
students to sign their preferences.
The all-campus tourney is being
held in conjunction with the an-
nual Union Open House, which is
scheduled this year for March 15.
Semi-final and final matches in
all three events will be played on
that date.
oneir i u i ,

1
MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
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LOST AND FOUND
BROWN PURSE. Keep money, return
green wallet with papers, Admin.
Bldg. lost & found. Fayanne Shapiro.
)6L
LOST. Men's Black Raleigh Bicycle,
front of Angell Hall, Mon. evening.
Call B. Hague, 31498 or return to 426
E. Kingsley, or Angell Hall. )5L
LOST-MEN'S WRISTWATCH, Girard-
Perregaux. Self-winding. Between
Liberty and William on Maynard,
about 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 6.
Reward. Call Chuck Elliott, Michi-
gan Daily, 23241. )1L
FOR SALE
PHILCO radiophonograph table model
combination. 78 R.P.M. changer,
phone 31966. )10
LADIES' English Raleigh bicycle. 3
speeds. Used 3 months. Call 30015.
CANARIES and other cagebirds. Sup-
plies and cages. 562 S. 7th Street at
West Madison.8
ARMY-NAVY Oxfords $6.88. Black,
brown. Comfortable. Sizes 6 to 12.
A to F. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash.
WOOD for sale, fireplace or furnace.
Cutting now. Any length. Phone
2-7636. )6
1951 FORD OVERDRIVE
CUSTOM V-8 TUDOR
fully equipped, 7,000 miles.
$1795. Phone 27559
FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE furnished apartment. 5
rooms, private bath. Studio apart-
ment, entire 3rd floor. Suitable for
Graduate students. Phone 5201. )5F
MALE GRAD. student desires to share
apartment. Conveniently located.
Phone 27748. )4F

'
ROOMS FOR RENT
POLI SCI grad student seeking 1 or 2
other grads to share apartment. 315
E. Liberty. Tel. 3-0254. ) 12R
CAMBRIDGE 1430-Single or double for
men, private shower, lots of closets.
quiet home. )13R
SINGLE ROOMS for men, 1346 Geddes
Ave. 2-7044. )14R
ONE ROOM for male student. 509 Wal-
nutnphone 30807. Close to campus-
arrange terms. ) 15R
TWO-ROOM suite with cooking facili-
ties, very reasonable, good location,
student landlord. Call 27862, 940
Greenwood. ) 3R
DOUBLE ROOM, kitchen privileges.
6161 W. Madison. Call after 5:30. 7398.
)11R
2-2-ROOM suites, suitable for 2, 3, or
4 people. On campus, 20542. )l1OR
ROOMS for men who would like a quiet
place to live. Fraternity section.
1402 Hill St., call after 5:30. )9R
GOOD SIZED furnished room, busline,
5 blocks from campus in return for
8 hours work a week. Phone 1-5 p.m.
2-0648. )8R
STUDENTS interested in boarding at
fraternity call-2-9431. )1X
CAMPUS Tourist Home-Rooms by day
or week. Bath, shower, television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )5R
DOUBLE ROOMS - Half block from
campus. Linen furnished, gas heat,
hot water, quiet and convenient. 417
E. Liberty. )4R
BOARDING-Meals taken, arranged as
desired. Convenient, reasonable, es
cellent home-cooking. Call 6641 eve-
nings. ) lX
HELP WANTED
STUDENT'S WIFE or coed for part time
work in coffee shop. Hoprs are 7:30-
9:30 mornings or 2-4, lWbnday thru
Friday. Phone 5464 or 6087. ) 1H
A PRINTER. A man with some print-
ing experience. 8758 Kay's Press. )4H

BUSINESS SERVICES

TYPING-REASONABLE RATES.
CURATE & EFFICIENT. Phone

AC-
7590,

WANTED TO BUY
WANTED TO BUY: Tux: Double breast-
ed, size 37 long. Call 30521 Ext. 877.
)1X
WANTED TO-RENT
WANTED TO SUBLET: Furnished
apartment for the summer term by
three responsible school marns. Must
be located near the Education School.
Contact B. L. McGeath, 542 Trow-
bridge, Allegan, Michigan. )1W
MISCELLANEOUS
MAGAZINE Subscriptions can be or-
dered merely by phoning 6007, Stu-
dent Periodical Agency. )2M
MEN ON NORTH CAMPUS-All you
can eat, three square meals a day,
12.50 per week. "All Profession" Fra-
ternity at 1010 East Ann St. or call
24200 & ask for Bob Boerema. )11M
GOING TO EUROPE next summer?
Travel in comfort by automobile.
Tours conducted by experienced per-
sonnel. Call Dick Hodgman 23256.
)IlOM
For (Beauty Counselors Cosmetics)-
creams, colognes, soap etc., for both
men and women, Phone 25152. )5M
GOOD MEALS at reasonable prices.
Medical Fraternity has openings for
any males. One block from campus.
Call 9611. )7M
MEALS at Fraternity House, good food,
reasonable prices. Call 28312. )6M
BOARDERS WANTED - Reasonable
rates for good food. 3 blocks south-
east of campus. Call William Kempf
for rates. Call 2-0549. Am
WANTED: Boarders! Good food, moder-
ate prices, eat in fraternity house
close to campus. Gene, 38581. )9M,
MEALS, Homestyle cooking, reasonably
priced. 1 block from campus. Phone
31841. )3m

It

^!>

-Daily-Al Reid
PRE-PLAY CONFERENCE-Composer Robert Cogan explains
the score of his music to Arts Theater Club actress Jo Willoughby,
who sings several of his songs in the Brecht play, "A Man Equals
a Man."
Coeds Reluetant To Jump
At. Leap Year Opportunities

By DONNA HENDLEMAN j
Local men who might have
dawdled with the idea of possible
leap year opportunities may have'
to do their own proposing.
According to statistics released
by the Institute of Life Insurance,
the odds are at least three to two
against his getting proposed to
this year.
* * *
AND THE STATISTICS don't
tell all the story, for a spot check
of University women has shown
that most of the gals would not
take advantage of leap year to
force their affections on a man,
Pledges Aid .Y'
During 'Help
Week'_Activiy
Walls were washed, floors swept
and ceilings painted as fraterni-
ties gave needy local organizations
a helping hand last week in-their
program to convert "Hell Week"
into "Help Week."
THE LOCAL YMCA received
most of the aid as pledges from
Alpha Tau Omega, Beta Theta Pi,
Phi Gamma Delta, Theta Delta
Chi and Phi Delta Theta redecor-
ated the gym and performed a
general clean-up job.
Delta Kappa Epsilon fixed up
the detention quarters of the
Washtenaw County Hospital
while Sigma Nu went out to St.
Joseph's hospital and cleaned
up the debris left over from re-
cent construction there.
A once over was also given the
YWCA by Kappa Sigma pledges.
Petitioning Open
For LSAPoss
Petitions for seven positions on
the literary college steering com-
mittee may be picked up Monday
in the Angell Hall office of As-
sistant Dean James H. Robertson.
Joe Sullivan, '52, chairman of
the committee, announced that the
petitions must be completed and
handed in by Friday.
The steering committee posi-
tions offer students the -ppor-
tunity to discuss problem. with
the faculty and to plan topics of
discussion for the periodical lit-
erary college conferences.
THE STUDENT PLAYERS
PATRICIA SKINNER ;

Confronted with the thbught
of being proposed to, most men
said they "wouldn't mind at
all."
The insurance figures are based
on the 1950 census which shows
that there are almost twice as
many unmarried young men as
youthful spinsters.
APPARENTLY unperturbed by
their official title the "spinsters"
around campus say they won't be
led by their "plight" into popping
the question. "I think it's a stupid
tradition" one girl snapped out.
"It's the man's job to do the pro-
posing."
Another coed was more polite
in her observations. "Why it's
good manners to wait to be
asked" she explained coyly.
But one of the most womanly
observations came from one sage
commentator on the state-of-
things. "After all the man's got
to think he's got the upper hand,"
she quipped.
* * *
DESPITE the reticence of the
female contingent, a good many
men were quite willing to sanction
the leap year idea. Many looked
upon it as a "boon" to the bashful
male.

Ph. 5651
Ph. 5651

An Intimtate Theatre
Bringing Cinema Triumphs
From All Nationss

ENDING SUNDAY

r:"

Fund Set Up
A $1,000 emergency fund for
women students has been set up
under the direction of Dean of
Women Deborah Bacon by the
Louise Conger alumnae group.
Representing profits earned by
the group through sponsoring of
the Duke Ellington jazz concert
here last fall, the money will pro-
bably be loaned in amounts rang-
ing from five to 15 dollars. The
average donation, however, has
not been restricted.
To avoid the customary wait
which occurs when Atudents apply
directly to the University for
funds, the alumnae group placed
the money directly within the dis-
cretion of Dean Bacon.
With 106 members, the Conger
group has worked actively for 10
years to provide financial aid to
women students.

It

LAST TIME TODAY
"AN AMERICAN
IN PARIS"
Pius
"REVENUE AGENT"

I

.;

Bacteriologist Questions Value
Of New Germ-Killing Soaps

"A good old-fashioned scrub
with ordinary soap and water is
as effective as most of the so-
called germ killing soap com-
pounds on the market today."
That is the opinion of Prof. Carl
A. Lawrence of the bacteriology
department.
Prof. Lawrence, who has done'
extensive research in the field,
found that germicidal soap com-
pounds "are of questionable value
in the destruction of bacteria on
the skin."
"A CLEAN SKIN will free it-
self of many germs," he explained,
"and the simple act of washing
the hands with any kind of toilet
soap is a good practical sanitary
procedure."
"The odor of medication that
most of these germicide soaps con-
tain tends to lull their users into
a false sense of security," he
TYPEWRITING

said, "but these soaps have little
value as disinfectants."
Most of the soaps, the professor
explained, employ the chemical
hexachlorophene, known as G-11.
"While there. is some evidence
that G-11 soaps will reduce the
number of certain types of bac-
teria on the skin, they will not
give a sterile surface," he declared.

- PLUS
" ERROL
FLYNN
' Miche e Prele
S A aEPU~tIC EEAL''
Mon. thru Fri. 6:30 to 11:30
Sat.-Sun. Continuous 1:30 to 11:30

j',
r4

NOW PLAYING
Through Feb. 24
O
A MAN=A MAN
by Bertold Brecht
Arts Theater Club
Ann Arbor's
Professional Theater

I orP e NEMp

4 Days Only Starting
MONDAY

I

I

I1

i

I

by Maxwell Anderson
FEBRUARY 20-23 e

SHORTHAND
ACCOUNTING
OFFICE MACHINES
A single subject or a complete courseI
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
William at State Phone 7831 37th Year

with
CINEMA """""IJIYoung Democrats
and
Anthropology Club
pr e s ent
THETITAN.
(Michelangelo).

-.

I

I

Mhigan'siggest arey Show

Tado I I : 1

tib.% 4-+ *4,InIC%

s h
ROBERT NEWTON;

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