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May 23, 1952 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-05-23

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',

UDAY, MAY 23, 1952

THE MICflIGAN DAILY

rAGE THREE

STRIDE FOR STRIDE:
Ross, Cryer Renew Half Mile Rivalry

Dodgers Defeat
Cincinnati, 8-7

AN HONEST RACKET:
Webb Makes Grade at Fifth Singles

# # 4

(Third in a series of articles dealing
with the Western Conference Outdoor
Track and Field Championships to
be held in Ann Arbor May 30-31.
Next the quarter-mile.)
By ED SMITH
An old rivalry will be renewed
in the half mile in the 52nd an-
nual Big Ten Track and Field
Championships.
For the third time this year
Wolverine John Ross and Illini
Henry Cryer will match their
strides for what may be all-im-
portant points.
BOTH TIMES previously, a
fresh Cryer won out over the
Canadian speedster, who had been
winded by doubling in the mile a
mere hour previously.
Yet both times Cryer had to
run a tremendous race to win.
The first time they met was the
Indoor Conference Champion-
ship. Then Cryer ran a 1:52.9,
just nipping Ross by a step. His
time was a new Conference rec-
ord, erasing the' mark set by Don
Gehrman of Wisconsin back in
t. 1949.
The second time they met was
two weeks ago at Champaign. This
time both Cryer and his teammate
Stacy Siders finished ahead of
Ross. Siders and Cryer finished
almost shoulder to shoulder. Both
had the fine time of 1:52.3.
WHEN THEY MEET next week,
they will find competition galore
from new quarters. Other stand-
outs in the fitld include Len Truex
of Ohio State, Ted Wheeler of
Iowa, Dick Jarrett of Michigan
State, and Frank Duis of Wiscon-
sin.
Truex had to forgo the indoor
season due to illness, but the
ex-conference mile and half-mile
king will be back strong, bidding
}. for two crowns in those same
events.
Wheeler has exceptional speed

IN THE MILE. the hustling
Hawkeye turned in a respectable
4:14.1 during the indoor season.
By far his finest performance
came in the Drake Relays. Then
Wheeler in anchoring Iowa's two
mile relay team was matched with
Cryer.
Wheeler ran the best race of his
career in soundly whipping the
Illinois ace. His unofficial time
was a sizzling 1:51.6.
WOLVERINE FANS were hand-
ed a setback this week when hard
luck half miler George Jacobi
pulled his Achilles tendon. Jacobi
had just recovered from a muscle
pull that kept him out of indoor
competition and the beginning of
the outdoor campaign.r
Last week the Wolverine senior
won the half mile in a dual meet
against Notre Dame, displaying
fine form. Jacobi will probably be
out of the triangular meet this
weekend with Iowa and North-
western at Evanston and it is
doubtful if he will be able to com-
pete in the Big Ten meet next
week.

JOHN ROSS
... Canadian caper
* * *
for a middle distance man. In the
Indoor Conference meet he was a
membership of the championship
mile relay team. His contribution
was a fine 48.9 quarter.

Fine Showing by Backs
Highlights Spring Drills

By The Associated Press
BROOKLYN - Brooklyn's
league-leading Dodgers snatched
a game out of the fire yesterday,
rallying for four runs in the eighth
inning to overcome a three-run
deficit and nip the Cincinnati
Reds, 8-7. The triumph enabled
the Dodgers to maintain their
half-game edge over the New York
Giants.
Roy Campanella, returning to
the lineup after missing three
games because of a swollen hand,
struck the big blow for the Dodg-
ers, a game-tying home run fol-
lowing singles by Pee Wee Reese
and Jackie Robinson in the eighth
inning.
GIANTS 6, CARDS 0
NEW YORK-Monte Kennedy,
second line New York hurler won
himself a regular starting turn
today by pitching the Giants to
a 6-0 victory over the St. Louis
Cardinals.
Kennedy yielded only four
singles while his teammates routed
Redbird ace Gerry Staley and two
aides with an 11-hit attack that
included a home run by Davey
Williams and triples by Alvin
Dark, Willie Mays and Don Muel-
ler.
PHILS 6, PIRATES 0
PHILADELPHIA - Curt Sim-
mons, Philadelhphia Phillies' sen-
sational lefthander, yesterday won
his second consecutive shutout
victory by defeating Pittsburgh 6
to 0 on three hits and belted an
inside the park home run to aug-
ment his efforts.
Simmons struck out eight Pi-
rates, walked five, and was never
in danger of even being scored
upon. It was the lefthander's third
win against one defeat.
CUBS 3-0, BRAVES 0-5
BOSTON-After Bob Rush cut
down the Boston Braves with a
four-hit pitching performance to
give the Chicago Cubs a 3-0 tri-
umph, the Tribesmen, Sam Jeth-
roe and BobThorpe especially, re-
bounded to provide lefty Warren
Spahn with a 5-0 shutout in the
last half of today's doubleheader.
The burly Rush never was in
danger, as he clicked off his fifth
win, the last four in a row, against
two losses. He also' contributed to
the Cub's offense, collecting two
of the nine hits against Vern
Bickford jand driving in the first
Chicago run in the second inning.
RED SOX 3, INDIANS 2
CLEVELAND-Maurice McDer-
mott pitched and batted the Bos-

ton Red Sox to a 3-2 victory rVer
the Cleveland Indians before
5,494 fans today, giving them an
even break in the two-game series.
With the score tied 2-2, in the
ninth, McDermott lined a single
to left, moved to second on a
single by Johnny Pesky and slid
home with the winning run on a
single to right field by Billy Good-
man.
Rain Washes
Out 'M' Tit
The rains that drenched the
mid-west yesterday aided the Wol-
verine baseball team in its quest
for the Big Ten laurels.
The diamond squad, scheduled
to meet Notre Dame at South
Bend saw the game washed out
and picked up some added rest in
preparation for the big week-end
against conference opposition.
* * *
COACH RAY FISHER packed
his squad as soon as the game was
called and went straight to Evans-
Any member of the 'M' Club
interested in officiating in the
State High School track meet
Saturday at Ferry Field should
contact me at the Athletic
Building.
--Elmer Swanson
tong Illinois to await the game
with Northwestern there today.
Dick Yirkosky, left handed
hurler, will be the likely starter
for Michigan, Yirkosky, who
hails from Chicago will get 'a
chance to pitch in his own back-
yard against the strong but un-
predictable Wildcat nine.
Tomorrow it will be Coach
Fisher's "Gold Dust Twins," right-
hander Jack Corbett and south-
paw Marv Wisniewski going
against Wisconsin. The Badgers
were the pre-season conference
favorites, but have proved a disap-
pointment to the experts.
* * *
A CLEAN SWEEP of the three
games is almost a necessity if the
Wolverines are to take their 21st
Western Conference crown. They
trail the front-running University
of Illinois squad by percentage
points, having one two less games
and lost an equal number.

By JAY GRANT
Jay Webb, who is playing in his
first full year of Big Ten tennis
competition, is showing that he
has what it takes to play against
top flight performers.
As the first alternate last sea-
son, Webb saw little action, but
so far this year he has played in
every Wolverine match. He has
a creditable record of four wins
and three defeats.
* *
WEBB'S LOSSES were at the
hands of some of the top college
netters in the country. He has
lost to Bob Martin of Indiana and
Richard Roberts of Michigan
State in three sets and only once
has he been beaten in two succes-
sive sets, that defeat coming at
the hands of Tom Overholsar,
captain of the Notre Dame team.
Webb's home is in Toledo,
Weather Halts
IM Semifinal
Old man weather once again
threw a monkey wrench into the
softball playoff plans, as the
scheduled first place fraternity
semifinal between Kappa Sigma
and Sigma Chi was rained out.
The game will be rescheduled,
probably for some time early next
week.
However the Foresters and the
Actuaries did not let the rain stop
them. Playing under extremely
adverse conditions, the Foresters
soundly wallopped their oppon-
ents by a 16-4 count in an inde-
pendent league contest.
In a fraternity semifinal tennis
match, Zeta Beta Tau emerged
victorious, defeating Phi Kappa
Sigma, 3-0.
STAR
CLEANERS
1213 South University
3
for te price of
2
Dary Cleaning
Sale

JAY WEBB
. . nifty netter

Ohio, where he attended Ottawa
Hills high school. He got his
tennis background by playing
for his high school team for
three years. In 1947, as a sopho-
more, he won the Northwestern
Ohio District championship and
the following year he was the
runner-up in the same tourna-
ment.
Jay credits his father with first,

interesting him in the game and
giving him the correct fundamen-
tals necessary to play it well. The
senior Webb taught his son how
to play tennis eight fears ago
when Jay was in the eighthgrade.
* * *
SINCE THAT TIME his father
has sat on the sidelines watching
his son steadily improve until now
he is the number five singles man
for the University of Michigan.
Webb has had many moments
to remember, but to him the
most exciting experience he had
was making the Michigan team.
He has proven Coach Bill
Murphy's confidence in him by
playing far above average ten-
nis for the Wolverines.
He also credits much of his ten-
nis ability to the expert teaching
of Murphy, who feels that Webb
is "one of the hardest workers on
the squad." Webb, a junior, has
one more year of eligibility.
He is enrolled in the Business
Administration school but right
now is uncertain about his future.
If the draft allows him he would
like to continue his studies in law
school. Webb is in the Naval Re-
serve and feels sure that he will
be taken by Uncle Sam for a few
years after his graduation.

U I

Major League
Standings

By IVAN KAYE
Afterthoughts of Michigan's
1952 spring football practtice:
* * * *
MOST ENCOURAGING was the
show of hard running staged by
Norm Canty, Fred Baer, Dick
Balzhiser, Junior Stielstra, Ted
Kress and Don Evans. The sextet
of backs delighted Ferry Field on-
lookers with a consistent display
of aggressive ball carrying
throughout the six weeks of drills.
Big Ted Topor seemed to be
in mid-season form at the intra-
squad scrimmage. The 215
pound East Chicago, Indiana
signal caller still hits like a
freight train and has sharpened
his southpaw passing consider-
ably.
Duncan McDonald pitched two
touchdown passes in Saturday's
scrimmage and appeared cool,
oalm and collected in all phases
of quarterback play. McDonald,
whose experience in high school
consisted entirely of "T" forma-
tion work, was used often in this
capacity as Coach Bennie Ooster-
bann experimented wfth a good
many "T" plays interspersed in
the standard Michigan single wing
attack.
While Stielstra sparkled at the
right halfback position, others
performed well enough to gain
recognition from the coaches. Mel
Bernia, Ray Kenaga, Ed Hickey,
Stan Knickerbocker and Rusty

Swaney all were impressive, indi-
cating that there should be some
depth at the wingback spot next
autumn.
* * *
MEYER MORTON trophy win-
ner Gene Knutson sparked an
unusually good corps of ends un-
der the able direction of Coach
Bill Orwig. Freshmen Leo Schlict,
John Veselenak and Stan Bounds
served notice that they will be
right up there in contention for
starting berths when September
rolls around.
The return of Dick Strozewski
to the gridiron wars will un-
doubtedly strengthen Michigan's
tackle position. Sidelined last
year by a knee injury, the rug-
ged 6 foot 200 pounder from
South Bend, Indiana, gave every
indication during the spring
workouts that he is ready to re-
turn to the varsity lineup.
Ben Pedersen, Don Bennett, Jim
Balog, Art Walker, Ken Shields,
Bob Milligan and Carl Kamhout
have come through the spring
drills in good style, thus insuring
plenty of depth at the tackle posi-
tion.
* , .
THE STEADY performance of
guards Dick Beison, Don Dugger,
Jim Wagner, John Treadway, Joe
Shomsky and Ron Williams has
considerably brightened the out-
look for the 1952 edition of the
Michigan forward wall.

ilia
with WRIGHT& DITSON
GOLF EQUIPMENT
A*GOLF BALLS................54c up
* PRACTICE GOLF BALLS... .3 for $1
* HYDE GOLF SHOES..........$14.95
" Large assortment of GOLF BAGS
including Sunday Bags
* INDIVIDUAL GOLF CLUBS
Also a complete selection of
TENNIS RACKETS and TENNIS BALLS
- RACKETS RESTRUNG -
X SPORTING GOODS
624 S. Main Phone 2-4407

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L PCT. GB 1
Brooklyn ......... 21 7 .750 -
New York ........ 21 8 .724 '4
Chicago ........". 17 14 .548 5'1
Cincinnati ........ 15 15 .500 7
Philadelphia ..... 14 15 .483 7%V2
St. Louis ........ 15 17 .469 8
Boston.......... 12 16 .429 9 1
Pittsburgh .......528 .152 18V4
"YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 6, St. Louis .0
Brooklyn 8, Cincinnati 7
Philadelphia 6, Pittsburgh$ *
. Chicago 3, Boston 0 (first game)
Boston 5, Chicago 0 (second game)
TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at New York (night)-Sur-
kont (2-1) vs. Maglie (7-0)
Brooklyn at Philadelphia (night)--
'Wade (2-1) vs. Drews (1-2)l
Chicago at Pittsburgh (night)-]
Batten (2-2) vs. Friend (2-4);
St. Louis at Cincinnati (night)--
Brecheen (0-1) vs. Mizell (1-4) or
Raffensberger (4-3)
* * *
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L PCT. GB
Cleveland ........ 21 12 .636 --
Washington ....... 18 13 .581 2
Boston ........... 18 14 .563 2rj
New York ........ 16 13 .552 3
- St. Louis ......... 17 17 .500 4%
Chicago .......... 14 17 .452 6
Philadelphia ..... 11 16 .407 7
Detroit........... 8 21 .276 11
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Washington 4, St. Louis 2
Boston 3, Cleveland 2
New York at Chicago (rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Chicago (night)--Gray
(2-4) vs. Rogovin (3-2)
Cleveland at St. Louis (night)-Gar-
eia (5-2) vs. Bearden (1-0) or Garver
n sh(2-3)
(Only games scheduled)

_8

_

Favorite subject of

coeds -

S

- il

YOU

Come and

See

Them

in

I.F.C., BALL PICTURES
On Display in Administration Building
FRIDAY 10-4 P.M.

OUR COMPLIMENTS
to the
MICHIGAN
MR. FORMAL WINNER,
DAVE HIGGINS

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;,'fir' i'- ce.:
The ManhattanVericool!
A warm-weather wonder with
thousands of tiny windows
inviting every breeze, keep-
ing you cool and collected.

Shirts
gothing gets admiring glances
on the campus faster than a
handsome guy in a handsome
irt. To look your handsomest,
try on a Manhattan' Vericool
or a Manhattan' Burt

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The Manhattan Burt!
Traditional college man's
favorite. Lustrous Oxford
button-down with a natural
"soft roll" to the collar.

machines are amazing
but men are more so

DAVE HIGGINS, Sigma Chi

."Young ladies, if you will direct your atten-
tion to the complex telephone equipment on
the left, I think you'll agree with most folks
who tour our telephone oflices that it is
exceedingly impressive."
We think so too. But the minds of the
<-. ., .,1 arn nr L - - - -n-n< o n m .

They make headlines in fires, hurricanes
and floods. But much more important, they
give the world's best telephone service all
year round.
As the Bell System continues its growth,
new and even more amazing machines are

and MANY THANKS
x DON SHAFFER-

.. . ~ ..,r.,

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