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February 15, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T, FEBRUARY 15, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

poww"Wom-m-

Sextet Ready for Crucial Series

THREE FOR FOUR:
Tigers, Browns Trade Valentine Gifts

SPEAKINGofpt
BY GEORGE FLINTE

* * *

NCA A Invitation at Stake
In M'-Colorado Contests

TMEE new stars were born in Michigan athletics during the p
two months-
One of the faces has been familiar before, but not in the gol
aura which surrounds the well-known in collegiate athletics.
The trio-trackman Van Bruner, swimmer Don Hill, and ca
Don Eaddy-is a relatively new one and a relatively young one. Ead
is a freshman, Hill a sophomore, and Bruner a sophomore.
Last season the flashing spikes of Don Hoover, one of the t
hurdlers in the conference, consistently defeated Bruner over b
the lows and highs. And an attack of pneumonia took the Wenon
New Jersey boy off the competitive list for many weeks. His b
times indoors were 08.3 for the highs and 07.8 for the lows.
The potential all observers felt was present in Bruner is fina
coming to light in the current indoor season. Fans got a first h
at the 1952 edition at the Michigan Normal-Western Michigan tri
gular meet a couple of weeks ago. Bruner stepped over the highs
08 flat and over the lows in 7.4 to tie two Yost Fieldhouse records
In the annual AAU meet the lithe Bruner really turned i
on. He stepped over the highs in 7.9 to break the American dir
track record for the 65-yard distance. There was little doub
that the young man had arrived.
What's responsible for Bruner's sudden rise? Aside from t
fact that he has great natural running ability, a polishing up of fo
looks like a big factor from here. The hurdling foot seems to sn
down much more quickly this season than last, and an almost perf
start enables Bruner to get the jump over that first hurdle, often t
barrier that can upset an entire race.
* * * *
Hill Sparks 'M' Swimmers
HUL'S case is slightly different. He was prominent on the free
man squad last season and it was only a question of time bef
the 18-year-old from Cincinnati made his mark in Big Ten pools
And he has indeed been making marks this season. Tops so
has been the 22.5 effort he turned in for the 50-yard free style r
long ago. Along with an already proven All-American, Burw
(Bumpy) Jones, Hill provides the spark which could put the Wolv
ines in a challenging position against Ohio State in the Big T
championships.
He's a long, powerful athlete with one of the best racing di
in the country. His stroke is roughly similar to that of the ineligi
Ron Gora-a smooth, gliding pull which is deceptive when match
with the windmill motions of such sprinters as Ohio's Herb Kobaya
and Michigan State's Clark Scholes.
Comparisons are more difficult in basketball, but it can b
'r said with safety that young Eaddy has proved himself a capabl
player in his first year of college competition. A halfback durin
the football season, the freshman from Grand Rapids has grabbe
a regular guard spot with Ernie McCoy's rebuilding cagers an
should provide a large injection of experience during the nex
three seasons.
Fbr so small a man, Eaddy gets more than his. share of reboun
He's a good ballhandler, and a consistent scorer from long and sh
range. Along with the diminutive Doug Lawrence, he forfns an e
cient backcourt duo which could put the Wolverines back on the v
tory path If the mediocre forward corps could produce some points
Eaddy was the hustler who was in great measure responsible
the cagers' finest performances-the defeat of Michigan State.
even took rebounds away from the Spartans' big rough man, grid
Bob Carey. He and the other two young meteors should give Michig
sports fans a lot of enjoyment in the next few years.
Slaughter at Convention Hall
WATCHED a bull fight Wednesday night.
The toreadors and rose-bedecked senoritas were absent, but
the rest of the sadistic flavor was present at Philadelphia's Convent
Hall. An ancient and balding warrior named Lee Savold stood w
his arms inactive for six long rounds and was slowly butchered b;
young "sensation" named Rocky Marciano.
Savold didn't even throw a telling punch for three rounds.
didn't go down; neither did he muster up the dying courage the
flings into his final bloody charge. For Savold, it was a question
standing there and hoping the Rock would get tired. For Marcia
it was no more trouble than his daily workout on the heavy bag.
If Marciano is the cream of the heavyweights these flays, t
class must be entirely skim milk. Although the aging Joe Louis ,
lost so much of his once-precise timing he couldn't prevent the you
Massachusetts lad from rocking him to the canvas, any good bo
should be able to cut Rocky to pieces. His wild-swinging att.
leaves him wide-open on almost every flurry. A counter-puncher
middleweight Ray Robinson or welterweight Johnny Bratton wo
find little trouble nailing the Rockland mauler.
He's been compared to Dempsey. If Dempsey was no better th
that, we're sadly disillusioned about the hallowed heroes of the pr
ring.

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By HOWARD ROBINSON
keyed-up Wolverine hockey
teafa will skate onto their home
ice a{ 8 o'clock tonight for the
first tilt of their important two
game series with Colorado Col-
lege.
Coach Vic Heyliger didn't have
too much trouble building his
boys up for the contest, since they
all realize that their position in
the final MCHL standings may
well be decided this weekend.
COLORADO COLLEGE is cur-
rently Michigan's closest competi-
tor for second place in the league

WILLARD IKOLA
... Tiger Tamer?

Top Big Ten Court Squads
Face Lack-luster Opposition

By DICK LEWIS
Every year about this time the
basketball "spoilers" have a field
day.
In Big Ten action tomorrow
night, the second division ball
clubs get their big chance to
knock of f the leaders and reap
some glory out of otherwise un-
successful campaigns.
TOP CONTESTS will find Ohio
State (4-5) at Illinois (7-1) and
Iowa (7-1) at Purdue (2-7).
The Buckeyes are in a good
spot to knock the Illini right
out of their first place deadlock
with Iowa. Two weeks ago at
Columbus, Coach Harry Combes'
five came from behind only in
the final two minutes of play to
eke out a 66-62 win.
Big man in the OSU, attack is
sophomore center Paul Ebert. The
6-foot-4-inch Ebert has tallied 180
points in nine Big Ten contests to
rank fourth in the league with a
20-point per game average.

THE ILLINI have a definite
heightladvantage in 6-9 John Kerr
and 6-8 Bob Peterson, a pair of
interchangeable centers who rank
first and fourth in the Orange
and Blue scoring.
Iowa opens a three game ser-
ies of road contests with last-
place Purdue at Lafayette. The
powerful Hawkeyes have regis-
tered 5 wins in 16 outings and
are averaging more than 71
points per conference game.
Chief reason for the phenome-
nal Iowa success is the phenome-
nal Iowa pivotman, Chuck Dar-
ling. He has already broken the
Hawkeye season scoring record
held by Murray Weir, and has
scored 208 markers against Wes-
tern Conference foes for a 26
point per game mark.
Other games will see Michigan
State (4-5) at Wisconsin (2-5),
Indiana (4-4) at Northwestern
(4-6), and Minnesota (7-3) at
Michigan (2-6).

and if the Wolverines hope to gain
a bid to the NCAA tourney in
March, it is almost imperative
that they sweep both games from
the CC Tigers.
Both teams are tied for sec-
ond place in the league with 14
points, but Colorado has played
one less game than Michigan.
Only the two top teams in the
league are invited to the tour-
ney, so this weekend's series will
go a long way towards deciding
Swhich two teams will get the
coveted invitations.
Colorado College comes into Ann
Arbor fresh on the heels of two
victories over Michigan State.
They took the first from the
highly improved Spartans, 3-0,
and completed their sweep in the
second game, 6-3.
THE TIGERS are in good shape
for tonight's game, except for Dick
Kennefic who injured his shoulder
in the State series and may not
see action this weekend.
The Tiger nets are patroled by
Ken Kinsley, a bright young
sophomore goalie. Coach Hey-
liger watched Colorado play at
East Lansing and he had noth-
ing but praise for Kinsley.
In fact, he had praise for the
whole team, but is still confident
that the Wolverines will do all
right if they play the kind of
hockey they're capable of playing.
In front of Kinsley for a good
part of the game will undoubtedly
be Colorado's high scoring first
line of Tony Frasco, Ron Hartwell
and Omer Brandt.
* * *
MICHIGAN will be at full
strength tonight, but Coach Hey-
liger is uncertain as to who he
will start in the important game.
Eddie May has just regained his
eligibility and will be joined on
the new line by John McKennell
and Doug Philpott.

DETROIT -(-()--The Detroit
Tigers and the St. Louis Browns
announced a Valentine's Day deal
involving seven players, which
both clubs say will strengthen
prospects for the 1952 season.
The deal, a straight trade, was
announced by Tiger General Man-
ager Charlie Gehringer. It moves
Tiger pitchers Bob Cain and Gene
Bearden and first baseman Dick
Kryhoski to the Browns.
ST. LOUIS catcher Matt Batts,
outfielder Cliff Mapes, pitcher
Dick Littlefield, and infielder Ben-
jamin Taylor will join the Detroit
club.
An all-night dickering session
between Gehringer and Bill
Veeck of the Browns preceded
the announcement and climaxed
NOW grow o MUSTACHE of distinction
L " a any tpe
STACHIEL of safety
tform any razor con
style y ouwish Z\ / /- s e used
t o F. SEAMOUR PRODUCTS
S.1. M"A"00 . 5i S,.h Wadock A...'.

O Michigan's Biggest Variety Show
GULATIC S REVUE
11 Student Acts
Your Applause Picks the Winner
Sat., Feb. 23 Hill Auditorium 65c
U =7) 4. Ut=?} Y+ t) t} '? G'{);;"I() ,,

rii

long-standing hunts for talent
by both clubs.
In Batts, a 29-year-old right
hander, the Tigers feel they may
have the catcher they have sought
for so long.
*5 * *
GEHRINGER expressed pleas-3
ure in Batts, a "proven majorZ
league catcher " He hit .285 last1
year for the Browns and the Bos-
ton Red Sox, sports a .277 lifetime
mark in the major leagues.
Cain, a 27-year-old left-

hander, posted a 12-12 record
last year. He came to the Tigers
from the Chicago White Soxin
return for pitcher Saul Rogovin
shortly after last season opened.
Mapes, a long ball hitter, con-
nected for nine home runs last
year, playing 101 games for the
New York Yankees and the
Browns. The 30-year-old out-
fielder hit ,262.
LATE BASKETBALL SCORE
St. John's 59, St. Bonaventure 56

SEMI-ANNUAL

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A large selection of

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soiled, discontinued stylles and many de-

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Originally priced $3.95 to $5.00

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ids.
ort
ffi- Gaimpus Interviews on Cigarette Tests :
Sze- 8
'ic-
for
He .[No. 33... T E SHE EP
der
.an
all "They lcan't
ion Te
ithth WOl'
y a
He over my
bull ~~ .-
of
no,
hat
has
ing
xer
ack -
ike
uld ____
an
ize
They tried to fool him with the "quick-trick"
cigarette mildness tests-but he wouldn't go astray!
- ;W We know as well as he there's only one fair way to
test cigarette mildness.And millions of smokers agree!
It's the sensible test...the 30-Day Camel
Mildness Test, which simply asks you to try Camels=
as your steady smoke, on a day-after-day,
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you've tried Camels for 30 days in your "T-Zone"

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I1

. .s

THOROUGH - SPE

for
BEER... WINES
SOFT DRINKS
try o r
TIIRLTSERVICE

HEYIRE both good basketball
players. But if we were to
judge them the way we judge
telephone equipment, we'd take the
small one.
You see, telephone equipment occu-
pies valuable space, uses costly mate-

on size, came up with a new small
type. When 600 of these new ampli-
fiers are mounted on a frame two feet
wide and eleven feet high, they do a
job which once required a roomful of
equipment. Size was cut - but not
performance!

EEDY - NO PARKING PROBLEMS

I

r

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