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April 25, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-04-25

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

I

Michigan Nine Encounters Illini Today

C"}

* * *

Either Yirkosky, Corbett
To Make Big Ten Debut
Young Squad Seeks Sixth Straight Win;
Michigan Faces OSU Twice Tomorrow

By BOB MARGOLIN,
A Michigan nine without a sen-
ior in the lineup will begin its
chase for the Big Ten flag with a
single game against Illinois this
afternoon at 3:30.
Tomorrow the Wolverines, who
have won five in a row, are slated
to face the defending champion
Ohio State in a twin bill begin-
ning at 1:30 'p.m. All three games
are scheduled for Ferry Field.
COACH RAY Fisher is relying
on a trio of young pitchers, fresh-
man Mary Wisniewski, sophomore
Jack Corbett and junior Dick Yir-
kosky to carry the squad's mound
chores in its three game stand,
while freshman Dick Leach will
handle the catching assignment.
Either Yirkosky or Corbett,
who hasn't given up a run in
27 innings this spring, will get
the nod today and the other two
men will work tomorrow against
the Buckeyes. Fisher indicated
that freshman Ralph Fagg
would be available for relief du-
ty if needed.
As usual this spring, freshman
Don Eaddy at third base will team
up with three veteran juniors,
Captain Bruce Haynam, shortstop,
Gil Sabuco at second and first
baseman Bill Mogk to form one of
the Big Ten's better infields.
* s
JERRY HARRINGTON, who
found his batting eye on the Wol-
verine's spring trip, will be back
in the lineup this weekend after
a two week layoff caused by a
r

twisted ankle. Juniors Frank How- u
ell and freshman Paul Lepley and
Dan Cline are also slated to see
plenty of action this weekend as
Fisher maneuvers his outfielders
tagainst left and right handed
twirlers.
Ohio State comes to Ferry Field
with an eight and two record this
season, the two losses being at the
hands of Notre Dame, who was
later defeated by Michigan.

-Daily-Matty Kessler
BRUCE HAYNAM
. . . slick shortstop

WORLD BEA TERS:
Distance Medley Team Eyes
Own Record at Penn Relays

By JOHN JENKS
Michigan's medley distance re-
lay team, not content with their
present world mark, will try again
for a record-smashing effort in the
Penn Relays at Philadelphia today
and tomorrow.
The celebrated quartet of Aaron
Gordon, Jack Carroll, John Ross
and Don McEwen will head' an
11-man cinder contingent that
will represent Michigan in the
eastern outdoor carnival.
COACH Don Canham predicted
that "if weather conditions are
right and other things fairly
equal" the foursome should snip
a little bit more off the 9:56.3
world-record mark it set last week
at the Ohio Relays.
If that should happen, the
new mark would probably stand
for many, many years. Only

rarely does a college come up
with four top-notch individuals
that can turn the trick.
North Texas State Teachers,
whose record the Wolverines shat-
tered, saw its mark hold up for
14 years before it fell.
IN THE OTHER relay events a
team composed of the distance
medley men, but with Bill Hick-
man replacing Jack Carroll, will
run in both the four mile and two
mile relay races this afternoon.
Michigan's mile relay team,
called by Canham the best Wol-
verine entry in a decade in the
event, rounds out the Maize and
Blue relay entries.
Al Rankin, who has been injured
most of the year, will lead off, fol-
lowed by Dan Hickman, Bill Kon-
rad, and the 46.1 quarter-mile
sensation, Jack Carroll.
VAN BRUNER will compete in
the 120 yard high hurdles before
a home-town crowd. Bruner will
be pressed to beat teammate Wally
Atchison, who defeated him con-
vincingly last weekend.
Large Fritz Nilsson, the Mich-
igan strong-boy, will put his
talents on exhibition before the
eastern track fans in both the
discuss and shot events.
s s a
MILTON MEAD, the splendid
splinter, will again try to show
them how it's done in the high
jump. Since his track debut in
the Big Ten indoor finals, when
he was bested by Illinois' Ron
Mitchell, tall Milt has never tasted
defeat.

Alpha Delts,
ZBT Score
SoftballWins,
Fine pitching, powerful hitting,
and tight ballgames were all pres-
ent at Ferry Field yesterday as
the social and professional fra-
ternities engaged in intramural
softball play.
In a real thriller, Stan Gelbman
beat out a bunt with two out in
the bottom of the last inning to
score Jerry Helfenbein from third
with the winning run as Zeta
Beta Tau squeezed by Tau Delta
Phi, 9-8.
Alpha Delta Phi outscored the
Psi U's, 22-16, in a real slugfest.
In another high-scoring game,
Phi Sigma Delta, sparked by Bob
Blumenthal's two home runs in
the four sh inning, walloped Pi
Lambda Phi, 24-2.
Pitching was not a lost art,
however, as many fine perform-
ances were turned in. Larry Gray
hurled a two-hitter for the Sigma
Phi Epsilon nine as they defeated
Sigma Phi, 5-2. A similar feat was
turned in by pitcher Henry Heil
of Phi Delta Theta as the Phi
Delts turned back Phi Sigma Kap-
pa, 6-2.
SOFTBALL RESULTS
Phi Sigs 24, Pi Lams 2
Phi Delts 6, Phi Sigma Kappa 2
ZBT 9, Tau Delts 8
Sig Eps 5, Sigma Phi 2
Alpha Delts 22, Psi U 16
TKE 20, Chi Psi 9
Nu Sigma Nu 32, PDE 8
Alpha Rho Chi 17, Delta Sigs 6
Psi Omega 8, AKK 7
Alpha Kappa Psi 12, PDP 0
Tau Epsilon Rho 15, Law Club.
Phi Chi 13, Alpha Chi Epsilon 1
Delta Sigma Delta 5, PDC 0
Phi Alpha Kappa 8, Phi Eps 2
Major League
Results
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Boston 3, New York 2
Detroit at St. Louis, cold
,Philadelphia at Washington,
rain
Only games scheduled.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Boston 6, New York 3
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, rain
Brooklyn at Philadelphia,
rain
Cincinnati at Chicago, cold.

Evans Makes Easy Pars
Look Hard in Titan Meet

By DICK LEWIS
"Those are the two hardest pars
I ever had in my life."
That's what Michigan golfer
Dick Evans, on the way to a one-
under-par 71, said during Wed-
nesday's meet with Detroit at the
University links. He was referring
to his phenomenal recovery on
holes five and six.
ON TOP BY four holes over Ti-
tan Paul Van Loozen, Evans drove
Mat Captain
Norvard (Snip) Nalan, Mich-
igan's Big Ten wrestling cham-
pion at 130 pounds, yesterday
was elected captain of the 1952-
53 Wolverine mat squad.
Nalan, a sophomore from
Mason City, Iowa, will replace
Bud Holcombe, this year's cap-
tain.
deep into a sandtrap to the left
of the green on the par three fifth
hole.
He blasted out of the trap,
but the ball carried over the
cup and a few feet off the green.
The Cleveland veteran then took
his five-iron and chipped the
ball twenty feet into the cup for
the par three.
Playing on the 380-yard sixth
hole, Evans was in even more
trouble. His initial drive, held up
by the high winds, landed in the
middle of a miniature forest.
,* * *
EVANS contemplated the situa-
tion. He chose a long iron and took
a few practice swings.
But in the middle of his back-
swing, some of the branches of
an innocent elm impeded the
normal arc of the club, and
Evans could take only half of his
usual powerful stroke.
Evans again contemplated the
situation. This time he chose a
longer iron, and his half-swing
smacked the ball on a long line
towards the middle of the fair-
way.
AGAIN Mother Nature stopped
Evans. The ball didn't roll an
inch when it hit the ground. An
all night rain had mired the turf.
Evans wasn't flustered. He
grabbed his nine-iron and arch-
ed a pretty chip shot that landed
only a' few inches from the pin.

His old reliable putter put away
the par, one of 15 he garnered
on the day.
Another comeback story turned
up on the 515-yard twelfth hole,
but Evans wasn't involved in this
one.
* * *
TONY NOVITSKY, shooting in
the number one singles position
for Detroit, got off a tee shot that
carried a good 200 yards close
to the top of a hill.
His next shot went another
225 yards, but it came down 30
yards in front of a clump of
tall trees, in back of which lay
the green on top of another
hilL.
Novitsky lined up his shot, and
decided that the only way to
reach the green would be to hit
over the trees. For this feat he
selected a nine-iron.
The would-be tree-clearing
stroke was dubbed and travelled
only 30 yards, exactly the dis-
tance to the base of the clump
of trees.
Two holes behind his opponent,
Dean Lind, Novitsky had his work
cut out for him. He had to gun the
All men interested in the all-
campus horseshoe singles please
sign up at the Intramural
Building before Wednesday,
April 30.
--Bob Berman

I1-\/
(2't i/ ,

W

II

STAY OUT OF
THE RAIN!
Drive right through
for
WINE - BEER
SNACKS - SOFT DRINKS

I

ball through
between two
shrubbery to
of the hill.

a six-inch opening
trees and a lot of
the green on top

SS SAVE AT SAM'S STORE____

Novitsky took a little longer this
time. He swung easily and sent
the pellet whizzing to within four
inches of the cup..
P. S. Novitsky parred the hole.

* Read and Use Daily Classifieds

*

Ohio Illinois Head Contenders
For Conference Baseball Title

I'

With Big Ten baseball compe-
tition getting under way today no
one team loois as a heavy favor-
ite to claim the flag four weeks
and 15 games hence.
Ohio State and Illinois, one-two
finishers last spring, appear to
have the inside track but both
squads must first shake off the ef-
fects of important graduation
losses.
THE BUCKEYES remain strong
on the mound where returning vet-
erans Ed Bohnslav, Harry Scutt
and Paul Williams boast a combin-
ed record of six wins and one loss
in last ;year a conference play.
Rookie Paul Ebert of basketball
fame and letterman Dave Bechtel
will add depth to the staff.
Elsewhere, however, O h I4o
State will field a fairly green
.team. All-American centerfield-
er Stew Hein, shortstop Jack
Jones and catcher Jack Gannon
are the only veteran fielders
Coach Marty Karow has to work
with.
At Illinois the problem is re-
versed. With several veterans re-
turning to the infield and outfield
the defense is strong and the hit-
ting, weak so far this season,
should improve.
* * *
HOWEVER, THE Illini will sore-
ly miss such pitchers as George
Maier (5-1) and Herb Agase (2-0).
Righthander Carl Ahrens is the
best twirling prospect at the mo-
ment.
Three other teams, Michigan
State, Iowa and Michigan will
also make a strong bid for the
pennant.
The Spartans rolled up an im-
pressive eight and four record on
their spring training jaunt. Four
juniors, southpaw Don Quayle,
and right handers Bob Dangl, Gus
Carlson and Roger Howard, shar-
ed the victories. Veterans hold
down every position except center
field where sophomore John Risch
is doing an able job.
* * *
WITH EIGHT lettermen return-
ing, including veteran twirlers
Bob Diehl, Al Lenski and Jim An-
dreasen, Iowa is a-'cinch to better
its eighth place finish.
Michigan, despite the fact
that it fields four freshmen ev-
ery game, must be considered a
contender if its pitching con-
tinues to look as good as it did
in winning seven and losing
4~ three so far this year.
Northwestern boasts an improv-
- ed pitching staff plus several three
FORDHAM UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF LAW

hundred hitters. Don Blaha, soph-
omore basketball star, paced the
sluggers with a spring batting av-
erage of .583.
DON COLNITIS returns to In-
diana with a 9-4 record, but the
Hoosiers were hard hit by gradu-
ation and don't promise to threat-
en. Likewise Minnesota and Wis-
consin. -
Purdue will field a veteran out-
field. However, the pitching de-
partment could be stronger.

I

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