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April 02, 1952 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-04-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1952

I I I ____________________________________ I

ANSWERS PRESS QUERIES:
Stalin Says War Not Near

NEW YORK-(P-Prime Min-
ister Joseph Stalin yesterday as-
sured a group of American news-
paper editors and radio men-at
long distance-that a third world
war is no nearer than it was in
1949 or 1950.
Stalin said he feels a meeting
of the chiefs of state of the great
powers possibly would be useful.
He also said the time has come
to unify Germany, and that Com-
munism and capitalism can exist
peaceably side by side-if.
HE EXPRESSED these views
in a telegram dispatched in re-
sponse to four questions sent to
him March 24. The telegram ar-
rived here, perhaps not by chance,
on the eve of the Moscow Eco-
nomic Conference, a major propa-
ganda project for the Soviet
Union. Stalin chose to answer the
questions at long range rather
than to receive the newsmen in
Moscow for a give-and-take inter-
view.
Americans and other western-
ers at United Nations head-
quarters here called the Stalin
pronouncements propaganda.
They speculated it was strange
for Stalin to make such com-
ments only a few days after the
Russian propaganda machine
reached a new high in assail-
ing the United States on charges
of using germ warfare in Korea.
Here is the question and answer
exchange as announced by James
L. Wick, Niles (Ohio) publisher
who was a member of the party
sending the queries.
Q. Is a third world war closer
now than two or three years
ago?
A. No, it is not.
Q. Would a meeting of the

* *

JOE STALIN
from the horse's mouth
* * *
heads of the great powers be
useful?
A. Possibly it would be useful.
Q. Do you consider the pres-
ent moment opportune for the
unification of Germany?
A. Yes, I do.
Q. On what basis is co-exis-
tence of capitalism and Com-
munism possible?
A. Peaceful co-existence of capi-
talism and Communism is quite
possible if there is a mutual desire
for cooperation, if there is a readi-
ness to fulfill the undertaken
obligations, if there is observance
of the principal of equality and
not interference in the internal
affairs of the other states.
The Stalin statement showed
nothing essentially new but it
aroused in some UN quarters the
query as to how close the world
actually may be to war. Stalin
spoke of a period before the Kor-
ean War-started in June, 1950-
and encompassing an easing of
tension following the ending of the
Berlin Blockade in 1949.
Semyon K. Tsarapkin, No. 2
man in the Soviet delegation at
the UN joined Jacob Malik's sec-
retary, A. K. Startsev, in deliver-
ing Stalin's telegram at Wick's
apartment a short time after Wick
arrived at Idewild Airport from
Europe.

By JAN WINNI
Premier Stalin's startling peace
proclamations yesterday received
a cool reception from two members
of the political science depart-
ment.
* * *
ACCORDING TO Prof. Marshall
M. Knappen, the statements were
good examples of the subterfuge
used by the Soviet Union to gain
their ends." Seeing Stalin's claims
of "peaceful co-existence of capi-
talism and communism' as a de-
vice to "lull to sleep the Western
nations," Knappen referred to a
pasage from Lenin's "Left-Wing
Communism, An Infantile Dis-
order."
The passage reads, "It is nec-
essary .... if need be to resort
to all sorts of devices, maneuvers
and illegal methods; to evasion
and subterfuge.'
Clinching the impossibility of
the United States attaching validi-
ty to the statement, Knappen
maintains, is another quote from
Lenin: "It is inconceivable that
the Soviet Republic should con-
tinue to exist for a long period
side by side with imperialist states.
Ultimately one or the other must
conquer."
As for the possibility that the
Soviet Union has discarded the
original Lenin doctrines, Knappen
dismissed it as "highly improb-
able, judging from their up-to-
date actions and methods."
PROF. MARBURY N. Efimenco
also saw little real significance in
Stalin's pronouncements, asserting
that "it doesn't add anything to
the picture." He felt that it is in
keeping not only with the usual
Russian propaganda but with the
truism that "no ruler of a great
power will openly admit that he is
leading his nation into war."
Adding that there may be a pos-
sible conection between the state-
ment and Russia's present policy
toward Germany, Efimenco never-
theless asked, "What else could
one expect of them?" The connec-
tion seen by Efimenco would be an
indirect move to further unifica-
tion of Germany under East Ger-
man leadership through promises
of peace.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all Miembers of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (11
a.m. on Saturday).
VOL. LXII, No. 129
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1952
Notices
Student Tea: President and Mrs.
Hatcher will be at home to students
from 4 to 6 o'clock, Wednesday, April 2.
Phi Eta Sigma. .A reminder that all
freshmen eligible for Phi Eta Sima
should sign up for membership at the
Administration Building from 1-4, Tues.
through Thurs., April 1-3.
Students, College of Engineering:
The final day for DROPPING
COURSES WITHOUT RECORD will be
Friday, April 4. A course may be dropped
only with the permission of the class-
ifier after conference with the instruc-
tor.
Students College of Engineering:
The final day for REMOVAL OF IN-
COMPLETES will be Fri., April 4. Peti-
tions for extension of time must be on
file in the Secretary's Office on or
before Fri., April 4.
Social Chairmen and Program Chair-
men of student organizations are re-
quested to calendar activities so as to
take place not later than May 21. Final
examinations begin on May 31. The ten
days prior to the beginning of a final
examination period has been designated
as closed to student sponsored activities.
Literary College Conference Steering
Committee, 1011 Angell Hall, Thurs.,
April 3.
Faculty, College of Literature, Science,'
and the Arts:
Midsemester reports are due Fri.,
April 4, for those students whose stand-
ing at midsemester is "D" or "E".
Report cards have been distributed
to all departmental offices. Green cards
are provided for reporting freshmen
and sophomores and white cards for
juniors and seniors. The reports for
freshman and sophomores should be
sent to the Academic Counselors' Office,
1210 Angell Hall; those for juniors and
seniors to the Board of Concentration
Advisers' Office, 1006 Angell Hall. Stu-
dents not registered in this college but
who elected LS&A courses should be
reported to the school or college in
which they are registered.
Additional cards may be obtained in
1210 Angell Hall or 1006 Angell Hall.
Hillel. Will those students soliciting
memberships for Hillel please return
their kits and the money.
Summer Employment: Students in-
terested in summer employment will
have an opportunity to examine the
Bureau of Appointment's personnel re-
quests from camps, resorts and indus-
tries, Thurs., 1 to 5 p. m., Room 3B,
Michigan Union. Those students who
have not yet registered for summer
employment may do so at that time,
A representative from Childraft
Books, a Marshall Field Enterprise, will
be in Room 3G, Michigan Union, Thurs.,
9 a. m. to 5 p. m. to interview men
and women students interested in sales
positions for the summer.
A representative from Russell Kelly
Office Service in Detroit will be in Room
3B, Michigan Union, Thurs., 1 to 5
p. m. to talk to interested women
students for summer office positions
in Detroit.
Personnel Interviews:
The following is a list of those com-
panies coming to interview the week
of April 14 through 18, that Is the week
following vacation: Tues., April 15,
OSCAR MAYER; Wed., April 16, LUM-
BERMENS MUTUAL CASUALTY COM-
PANY; U. S. GYPSUM; and SWIFT
COMPANY; Fri., April 18, MONTGOM-
ERY WARD OF CHICAGO and also DE-
TROIT; GENERAL ELECTRIC COM-
PANY of New York City. Appointments
can be made for these companies by
calling the Bureau of Appointments,
Ext. 371.

Personnel Requests:
SCRUGGS VANDERVOORT BANEYA
of St. Louis, Mo. has openings for1
women for the summer for positions,
on the College Board. Women from the7
St. Louis area who are interested must
have their applications in by April 15.
The U. S. CIVIL SERVICE COMMIS-
SION of Washington D. C. announces
examination for Radar Instructor and
Radar Instructor Trainee. The positions
are open at the Keesler Air Force Base,
Biloxi, Miss. A degree in Electrical
Engineering is required or at least 4
years of progressively responsible ex-
perience in radar or radio repair and
maintenance or in electronics research
or closely allied fields.
Selling Research, Inc. of New York
City is interesterinyoung men grad-
uating in June for positions in Market-
ing and Sales Research. They will come
to the University to interview if suffi-
cient people are interested. Contact
the Bureau of Appointments if you
would like to talk to them.
The MICHIGAN STATE CIVIL SERV-
ICE COMMISSION announces evamina-
ton for Employment and Claims Inter-
viewer I. Seniors who expect to receive
their degrees by September 1952 are
eligible to compete regardless of ma-
jor. Courses in Public Unemployment
Insurance, Economics, Labor, Personnel
Psychology and Law are desirable.
For further information, appoint-
ments and application blanks contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, Ext. 371,
Lectures
University Lecture. Dr. N. W. Mc-
Lachlan, author of books in applied
mathematics and consulting engineer
London, England, and visiting Profes-
sor of Electrical Engineering at the Uni-
versity of Illinois, will lecture on the
subject "SUbharmonlc Oscillations in
Electrical and Mechanical Systems,"
with an experimental demonstration,
at 4:15 p. m., Thurs., April 3, in Room
1400, Chem. Bldg. The lecture is under
the auspices of the Department of
Mathematics, the College of Engineering
and the Departments of Physics and
Chemistry. The public is cordially in-
vited.
Academic Notices
English 128. Students in Victorian
Literature are asked to bring their
Harrold-Templeman prose texts to class
today,
Geometry Seminar: Will not meet this
week. Next meeting April 16.
Applicants For Combined Curricu-
lums: Application for admission to the
combined curriculums with the Med-
ical, Dental, and Law Schools must
be made before April 18 of the final
preprofessional year. Application forms
may be obtained now at 1010 Angell
Hall and should be filed with the Sec-
retary of the Committees at that office.
Engineering Mechanics Seminar: Wed.,
April 2, 3:45 p.m., Room 101, West Engi-
neering Building. Professor J. W. Free-
man will speak on "Effect of Prior His-
tory on Material Properties."
Aero Seminar: The talk scheduled for
Thurs., April 3, by Mr. M. A. Brull,.
has been postponed to April 24. There
will be no seminar this week.
Astronomical Colloquium. Thurs.,
April 3, 4:15 p. in., the Observatory.
Professor Wilhelm Becker of the Ob-
servatory at Hamburg-Bergedorf, Ger-
many, will speak on "The Method of
Three-color Photometry and its Signi-
ficance for Problems of Stellar Statis-
tics."
Logic Seminar: Wed., April 2, at 2:10
p.m., in Room 2219 Angell Hall. Dr.
Clarke will continue his discussion on
"Algebraic Axioms."
Concerts
Voice Class Program under the direc-
tion of Arlene Sollenberger, 4:15 p.m.,
Wed., April 2, In 506 Burton Tower. So-
loists: Faith Cook and Ann Albert, so-
pranos, Sylvia Schreiber, mezzo-soprano,
Miriam Broderick, contralto, Eugene
Guettler, baritone; accompanists: Jus-
tine Votypka, Glenna Gregory, Char-
lotte Hoyt, Lois Beyer, Lucille Stans-
berry. Open to the public.
University Symphony Orchestra,
Wayne Dunlap, Conductor, will be heard
at 8:30 p.m., Wed., April 2, in Hill Au-
ditorium, with Benning Dexter, Asso-
ciate Professor of Piano, as soloist. The
program will open with Reznicek's Ov-
erture to "Donna Diana," followed by
Ross Lee Finney's Concerto in E major

for Piano and Orchestra In its first
American performance. Professor Finney
is Composer-in-Residence at the Uni-
versity of Michigan. Mahler's Sym-
phony No. 1 in D major will complete
the program. Open to the general pub-
lic without charge.
Student Recital: Na-ncy Philbin,
pianist, will present a program at 4:15
p. m. Thurs., April 3, in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater, in partial fulfillment
of the requirements for the degree of
Bachelor of Music. A pupil of Joseph
Brinkman, Miss Philbin, will play com-
positions by Bach, Beethoven, and
Prokofieff. The public is invited.
Student Recital: Carol Eagle, student
of piano with Av Com Case, will
play compositions by Bach, Mendels-
sohn, Ravel and Chopin, in her recital
at 8:30 p. m. Thurs., April 3, in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater. Presented In par-
tial fulfillment of the requirements for
the degree of Bachelor of Music, the
program will be open to the public
Events Today
SL International Relations Commit-
tee: Meeting at 3:30 at the SL Bldg. 122
Forest. There will be a, discussion of
the proposed Woman's International
House. Anyone interested in the project
is invited to attend.
Coffee Hour for students and faculty
of Math and Philosophy W111 be held
from 4 to 6 p. m. In the Union Terrace
Room.
Phi Beta Kappa: Annual meeting,
4:15 p. m., Room 1035 Angell Hall.
Members are urged to attend.
Roger Williams Guild: Easter Tea,
4:30-5:45 p. m.
ULLR Ski Club: Meeting. No movies.
Room 3K in the Mich. Union. 7:30 p.m.
Michigan Arts Chorale will meet in
front of Hill Auditorium by 6:30 p. m.
In full dress and ready to leave for
Farmingon.
Undergraduate Botany Club. The
meeting Wednesday will be held at the
University Museums, room,3024, with
Dr. Volney Jones as the speaker. Meet
promptly at 7:30 at the back door of
the Museums Building in order to gain
entrance.
Weekly Uinion Brige Tournament
will be held in room 3 of the Union,
at 7:15 p. m. Open to all students. Late
permission for coeds.
The Newman Club's Reader's Forum
will be held at 8 p. m. In the Newman.
Clubroom, Saint Mary's Chapel, Wil-
liams & Thompson Sts.
Dr. Alexander A. Schneider, Head of
the Department of Psychology of the
University of Detroit, will review Dr.
Karl Stern's book "Pillar of Fire."
Coming Events
Hillel is now accepting reservations
for the Passover meal's which will be
served on the 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th.
Call 3-4129.
Graduate Student Council meeting
Thurs., April 3, 7:30 p. m., Outing Club
Room, Rackbam.
Hiawatha Club Meeting, Thurs., April
3, 8 p. in., In the ABC Room of the
League. Final plans for exhibit to be
made.
Kappa Phi: Lenten meal and program
at 5:30 p. m., Thurs. at the Methodist
church. All members and pledges are
urged to be present.
Auditions for new WUOM broadcast
choir will be held Wed., and Thurs.,
April 2 and 3, 4-5:15 p.m., Room 113,
Hill Auditorium. Open to sopranos, al-
tos, tenors and basses with acceptable
vocal and sight-reading ability. Chor-
isters will receive compensation.
International Center Weekly Tea for
foreign students and American friends,
4:30-6 p. m.
Professor Samuel Dana, former Dean
of the School of Natural Resources and
member of the National Resources Task
Force of the Hoover Commission, will
speak at an American Society for Public
Administration - social seminar, Thurs.,
April 3, at 7:30 p. m. in the West Con-
ference Room, Rackham. His subject
will be "Administration of Natural Re-
sources." Members, wives, and friends
are cordially invited to attend.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1196
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5-average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Gold Elgin pocket watch Thurs.
on Washtenaw. Reward. Ph. 6295.
)36L
LOST-Red leather wallet. Money un-
important. Only anxious for return
of papers. If found, please notify or
send to Sue Freedman, 1805 Washte-
naw, phone 9388 or 6295. )38L
LOST-Sunday on E. William, 'speckled
rimmed glasses in case. Phone 3-0371
after six. )37L
FOR SALE

CLASSIFIEDS_

MISCELLANEOUS
MEALS-1 block from campus, frater-
nity quality. Low prices. 1108 Hill,
Ph. 3-1841. )26M
PERSONAL
AT LAST
Laundry service you wanted. 7 lbs.
for 56c. 1 day service. U. & M. Dry
Cleaners. 1306 S. Univ. )12P
WHOOP-DE-DO-I saved money, how
about you. Try the Student Periodical
Agency the next time you order or
renew. Phone 6007 and charge it! )20P
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing, Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )6B
TYPING-Reasonable Rates. Accurate
& Efficient. Phone 7590. 830 So. Main.
)1B
TYPEWRITER & Fountain Pen repair
work a specialty. Typewriters, Adding
Machines and W /C Tape and Wire
Recorders. Morrill's, 314 S. State St.
TYPING-IBM Electromatic; Thesis and
technical experience, stenography, Ph.
8587. )10B
FOR RENT
APT. HUNTING? - Try Apt. Finding
Service at the Campus Tourist Home.
Rooms by day or week. Kitchen Priv.
318 E. William St., 3-8454. )5R
SECOND FLOOR 2 - room furnished
apartment. Utilities paid. $12 a week.
Also 2-room suite with running water
suitable for two men students, $5
each. 917 E. Huron. )15F
LARGE, LIGHT, first floor double -
Hollywood beds, private entrance,
kitchen privileges if decired. Also
small basement room in exchange for
caretaking. 1019 Church St. Phone
6876 evenings.P)16F
TRANSPORTATION

Your Official UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN RING is waiting
for you - NOW - at
Burr Patt's, 1209 S. Univ.

)58

GABARDINE PANTS $5.49-$7.50 value.i
Colors: brown, blue, green, grey-ad-
vertised in Life. Sam's Store, 122 E.
WASH. Ph. 3-8611. ) 50
SUITS, jackets, top coats, 36 and 36
long. Bargains. Phone 3-0254. 315 E.
Liberty (side door). )63
HARLEY DAVIDSON, 125 motorcycle.
Excellent condition. Don Landis,
2-3297. )72
1939 PLYMOUTH COUPE-Good motor.
Heater, new plaid seat covers, for sale
by owner, $120. Phone 5996 noon or
evenings. )69

2 RALEIGH Racing Bikes a few months GET HOME the cheap way. Advertise
old. 25% off. Phone 3-0275. )70 for a ride. )9T

MEN'S BICYCLE, Tuxedo size 38 M,
Flash Camera. Call 2-4591, 418 Hay-
den. )71

MISCELLANEOUS

Life and Look magazine
describe it as...
"THE MOST COLOSSAL
MOVIE EVER MADE!"
M-G-M
proudly presents
COLOR BY
TECHNICOLOR
with
ROBERT TAYLOR
and
A Cast of Thousands

SPECIAL-on Poodle Permanents, com-
plete - $5.00. Modern Beauty Shop,
117% S. Mati, Ph. 8100. )20M
SHIRTS LAUNDERED-18c each. 1 day
service, no extra charge. U. & M. Dry
Cleaners. 1306.S. Univ. )23M
APPLICATION PHOTOS-3 day service.
Wed. and Sat. hours 10-4. Palmer
Studio, Michigan Theater Building.
)21M
USE OUR 'little' ads for 'Big' results.
Far-fetched? No-there's humor, in-
terest,texcitement, and Big news in
the little ads you find in the classi-
fied section of the Daily. )27M

I'd

&-....e

... . .....

as

it

STARTS TODAY thru SAT.

DESIRE RIDERS to Florida, share driv-
ing, depart April 4. Phone 3-8230.
) 14T
HELP WANTED
EARN $1,000 this summer. Here's your
opportunity for-pleasant employment
with a Marshall l ield owned organi-
zation. Openings for college men &
women to assist the director of Child-
craft work in your home state. Ask
for Mr. Gibson. Rm. 3G, Michigan
Union, Thurs., Apr. 3, 9-5. )16H
STUDENT'S WIFE or coed for part time
to work in coffee shop from 7:45 to
9:30 am. Monday through Friday.
Ph. 5464 or 6087. )17H
SALESMAN, part time, student who has
sales ability and some spare time to
call on restaurants, fraternity and
sorority houses, selling china, glass,
silver, kitchen utensils, and equip-
ment. $50.00 per month guarantee
against commission. Great Lakes Ho-
tel Supply Co. Mr. Siegel, Detroit,
Michigan. )18H
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS - One
qualified for supervision of rifle range.
Other for general camp supervision.
Experience preferable but not essen-
tial. Must be available for 10 weeks.
Ph. 2-9454. )19H
ROOMS FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOM, reduced rates. Phone
27044. )22R
MEN'S DOUBLE ROOM-530 Linden,
call evenings, 8598. )23R
WANTED TO BUY
2 SEASON TICKETS for May Festival,
main floor. 2-8409. Call between 5-7..
) 5X

Si
t

..1
I

DAILY,
CLASS IFIEDS
BRING
RESU LTS

--- PLUS
--+
"OUCTON tirring:
hilip Friend
Charles Coburn - Wanda Hendrix
TONIGHT
"MY FAVORITE SPY"
at 6:35- 9:35
"HIGHWAYMAN"
at 8:00 Only

I DAccnVFR kAAI

-- Miniatures --
"Car of Tomorrow"
"Beautiful Brazil"
FRIDAY
"PHANTOM OF
THE OPERA"

I

o

Last Premiere of
LA SIRENA VARADA
3-Act Play by Alejandro Casona
Curtain 3:15 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATER

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN SOCIETY
s present's
"PRINCESS IDA"
at.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater
April 16 through19
TICKETS:
Wed., Thurs. 90c, 60c - Fri., Sat. $1.20, 90c
BOX OFFICE OPENS APRIL 14

f'1

C

Mail this coupon for your copy of
"We Charge Genocide"
THE HISTORIC PETITION TO THE U.N.
To: Civil Rights Congress
1442 Griswold Street, Detroit 26, Mich.
Name

Address

City

Enclose $1.10 per copy, postage included.

-4i

_ --

FINAL WEEK
Rocket to the Moon
By Odets
ARTS THEATER CLUB
April 14 through April 27 - "OTHELLO"

WANT TO SEE"PAL JOEY?"-HERE'S HOW!
"Pai Joey" is currently Broadway's biggest hit. Lines at the
roddhurstThea,trel1daylong. No seats available forweeks.
, t , , , if you are coming to New York during
JUNE, JULY and AUGUST it will be easy to see this brilliant
musical comedy if you write for reservations NOW. Mail
orders from your college will be given prompt attention.

4

I A

I

EXECUTIVE
CAREERS
IN RETAILING
OnA-vear Course

* Prepare for a responsible executive
position in retailing: buying, adver-
tising, f ashion, management, person-
nel, or teaching. Specialized training,
exclusively for college graduates,
covers all phases of store activity.

41

'"A BRILLIANT PRODUCTION!"-ATKI"SON"' N.Y.m
"A ROARING SUCCESS!"-LIFE MAGAZINE
"TRE YEARSMOST ENTERTAINING SHOW!"- ESQUIRE
AJOI

M.T.

Ii

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11

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