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October 04, 1951 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-04

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1951

T HE MiCHIGAN D AiLY

PAGE THREE

Thomson Leads

Giants

to

First Pennant

Since

'37

BIG CITY AFFAIR:
Giant Rooters Run Wild
After Victors 'Get Bums'

Gridders Stress Offense
As 'M' Awaits Stanford

I-M Gridiron New Yorkers Explode in Ninth Inning
Champions To Win Playoff Series from Dodgers

4

(Continued from Page 1)

j

the Giants won the National
;League title 15 times previous to
this year
In the World Series, the Yan-
kees have won 13 times and lost
only four. The Giants have won
four World Series and lost eight,
three of their National League
championships coming when no
series were played.
The Giants and the Yankees
have met five times before in the
World Series, and the Yankees
hold the edge, three to two. The
last encounter was in 1937, when
the Yankees under Manager Joe
McCarthy won, four games to one.
Bill Terry managed the Giants.
THIS IS the first World Series
to be televised on a network that
stretches from coast to coast, and
the television and radio fees
amount to $1,000,000.
Tlils series will draw the rich-
est gate receipts ever, for each
park is the biggest in its league.
When the same two teams last
met in the series in 1937, ticket
prices were modest compared to
the 1951 scale.
* , *
NEW YORK-(IP)-Whooping,
. hollering Giant fans overran the
Big Town last night celebrating a
baseball victory that wrung the
' heart out of the Brooklyn Dodgers
and spread desolation from Flat-
bush to the Gowanus Canal.
The joy of the Giant rooters was
something to behold. And, some-
4 how, their jubilance caught on
w'ith even the most sedate non-
partisans.
WITHOUT EVEN a struggle
New Yorkers surrendered to the
baseball madness.
It was not the same old stuff
of the Yankees winning, as they
have done in the American
League three years straight.
This was a National League pen-
nant for the Giants, their first
since 1937.
As the excitement spread dur-
ing the day, business almost came
to stop except in those cases with
television sets.
CARLOADS of young Giant
fans roamed Manhattan last night
carrying signs: "Mass suicides in
Brooklyn.'
Brooklyn, the home of 3,000,-
000 die-hard Dodgerites, was a
picture of despair.
In bars, on the streets and in
many thousands of homes there
were moans and wringing of
hands. And the plaintive cry:
"What in Heaven's name did
they put Branca in for? Thomson
always blasts him."
* * *
SOMEBODY grabbed Durocher
around the :shoulder and yelled
that he did a great job of master
minding tin the ninth inning.
"I sure did," said Durocher
jokingly. "It didn't take much
master minding to get those hits
that set it. up for Bobby." .
Asked if he had said anything
on the bench before the start of
the Giants' ninth, Durocher re-
plied:
"I TOLD THE boys we had three

big outs left. You haven't given up
all year so don't give up now. Let's
get some runs. And the reply, al-
most 'in a chorus was, 'We'll get
the Bums'."'
"I knew I fit the ball hard but
it started sinking very fast,"
said Thomson of this 32nd hom-
er.
"But when I saw it go into the
stands I don't think I touched the
ground a single time the remain-
der of the way. I just floated
around. It was that kind of a
feeling."
* * *
DUROCHER PAUSED long
enough to discuss the World
Series, almost forgotten in the
furore of the pennant fight.
"Well," he said, "the Yankees
never lose. You've got to work
real hard to beat them. But I've
got a good club and we'll battle
them. I'm pitching Koslo tomor-
row."
Leo was forced to change his
pitching plans when Larry Jensen
* * *

Michigan's impotent offensive
team of last Saturday ran,
through a long scrimmage yes-
terday afternoon in an effort to
give Stanford a more vigorous
welcome than was accorded the
Spartans.
The Wolverines, who were able
to net only six yards forward in
the Michigan State clash, got
their offensive rolling several
times against the reserves yester-
day at Ferry Field in the long
three-hour session which also in-
cluded some defensive practice.
THE RUNNING attack func-
tioned quite smoothly as the var-
sity moved up and down the field
against the reserves. Frank How-i
ell looked very good on his car-
ries of the pigskin, picking up
several long gains in yesterday's
practice.
Wes Bradford saw consider-
able action in the scrimmage
and got off a number of long
runs against the deserves, as did
Bill Putich, who was used prin-
cipally at the left halfback spot.
With Putich at the tailback
spot, Coach Bennie Oosterbaan
employed Ted Topor, linebacker
on defense, at quarter for the
most part. Topor gives the Wol-
verines a strong blocker at quar-
terback, a necessary item in the
single-wing system.
li nsiaml Wins
Senior Loop
Batting Crownr
NEW YORK-()-The batting
averages of members of the New
York Giants and Brooklyn Dodg-
ers among the league's top ten
hitters underwent slight changes
during the three games playoff
series between the two clubs for
the National teague pennant.
Stan Musial of the St. Louis
Cardinals finished the regular sea-
son Sunday with the batting
championship. Musial picked up
his fifth crown with a .355 mark.
Richie Ashburn of Philadelphia
came in second with a .344 aver-
age.
* *
BROOKLYN'S Jackie Robinson
owned a .335 record after Sunday's
games and tacked on three points
during the playoffs to wind up
with a .338 figure.
Roy Campanella of Brooklyn
lost two points during the play-
offs and wound up fourth with
a .325 average. Monte Irvin of
the Giants slipped from .313 to
.312 and finished fifth. Johnny
Wyrostek of Cincinnati wound
up sixth with .311 and Ralph
Kiner of Pittsburgh, seventh
with .309.
Al Dark of the Giants lost three
points du-ing the series and came
home eighth with a .303 record.
Carl Furillo of Brooklyn failed to
get a hit during the series and his
average dropped from .301 to .295.

Defeat SAM

DON PETERSON and Tom
Witherspoon alternated at the
fullback post in yesterday's drill.
From this week's practices it
looked like Coach Oosterbaan
would use a backfield of Topor at
quarter, Putich at left half, How-
ell at tailback, and either Peter-
son or Witherspoon at full in his
opening offensive backfieldj
against Stanford.
Lowell Perry, injured end, was
in uniform yesterday, but left
practice before the scrimmage
started to have his back treated.
Bob Dingman played at Perry's
left end position yesterday and
may get the starting assign-
ment if Perry has not recovered.
Gene Knutson and freshman
Leo Schlicht who both saw serv-
ice at left end in the scrimmage,
are also in the running for the
offensive end position.-
The passing did not look as im-
pressive as the running attack as
the reserves rushed through to
down Putich on a number of his
passing attempts. Several short
passes did net yardage in the
scrimmage, however.
The defensive portion of the
practice was devoted to halting
the expected Stanford thrusts
through the Michigan line and
the passing of the visitors' T-for-
mation quarterback Gary Ker-
korian.
Iowa, MSC
On Defense
NEW YORK -- () - iowa's
Hawkeyes and Michigan State's
Spartans share defensive honors
in college football this weekend.
On the basis of its one game
with Kansas State, Iowa tops the
nation's major college elevens
with a defensive mark of 68. That's
the total amount K-State was
able to gain on Iowa last week.
Iowa held K-State to 21 yards on
the ground and 47 in the air.
FOR TEAMS which have played
two or more games, Michigan
State is the leader. The high-fly-
ing Spartans have yielded an av-
erage of only 106.5 yards per game
in tilts with Oregon State and
Michigan.
The Spartans' defense against
once-mighty, Michigan was re-
markable. They tossed the Wol-
verines around for a minus 23
yards rushing. Michigan picked
up a skimpy 29 yards on passes
for a total gain of six yards.
On total defense, figured on av-
erage yardage per game, Tulane
was second to Iowa with 78 yards
made against the Green Wave.
Holy Cross was third with 95 fol-
lowed by Michigan State, 106.5.
Figures are compiled by the Na-
tional Collegiate Athletic Bureau,
statistical agency of the NCAA.

Delta Sigs

Tally

Initial Win, 14-0
By DICK LEWIS
Sparked by the running and
passing of Milt Heath, Delta Sig-
ma Phi, defending intramural
fraternity football champions,
fought to a 14-0 victory over Sig-
ma Alpha Mu yesterday, in their
initial test of the new campaign.
Heath scampered around end
for five yards and the first Delta
Sig tally, and then tossed a 25-
yard pass to Carl Bryant for the
second TD. Bob Moore added a
safety to round out the scoring.
RUBBER-ARMED Jerry Davis
connected for four touchdowns
and fifteen out of seventeen pass
completions to lead Sigma Chi to
a one-sided 32-0 triumph over
Chi Psi.'
Davis hit Bill Ammerman, Paul
Fancher, Jim Young and Dick
Demmer for 30, 40, 5 and 10 yards
respectively. Fancher passed 20
yards to Ammerman for a fifth
touchdown.
Phi Kappa Psi used a fake
reverse play twice to pass Theta
Chi into 13-7 submission. Davey
Settle threw 40 yards to Karl
Krueger and also found Bud
Jones with a 50-yard aerial. Janj
Moeller tallied for the losers.
Bob Hastings ran for two
counters and passed for another
two to account for a 27-0 Delta
Chi win against Sigma Pi. Fred
Roneker was on the receiving end;
of the two Hastings' TD tosses.
: *
PHI DELTA THETA'S Gil Sa-
buco found the mark with nine
out of thirteen passes, good for
three touchdowns, to down Beta
Theta Pi 18-0. Mike Papista hutng
All soccer players interested
in playing on a team of Ameri-
cans in the International Soccer
League, please contact Bob Ely
at 2-0805.
--Rod Grambeau
on to two 15-yard throws for 12
points, while Dave Krupp gath-
ered in a 25-yard toss for the
other six.
The offensive-defensive combi-
nation of Lee Krumbholz and
Herb Spence led to a 19-6 Chi Phi
win over Kappa Sigma. Spence
made a spectacular catch of a 20-
yard Krumbholz aerial, which was
followed by two pay dirt intercep-
tions by Krumbholz.
In other contests, Swede Lauri-
tsen and Lyle Lapine collabora-
ted for a 29-0 SAE conquering of
Phi Kappa Sigma; Jerry Rovner
completed ten out of ten, passed
for two Pi Lambda Phi touch-
downs, and ran for another, to
turn back Trigon 27-0; and the
arm of Moe Katz featured a 20-.0
Tau Delta Phi score oveI TKE.
NEW STYLES FIRST
N ATW ,LD'S

NEW YORK-(')In a heart-
stabbing finish, Bobby Thomp-
son slammed a three-run homer
with two mates aboard in the
ninth inning to give the New York
Giantsa 5 to 4 victory over Brook-
lyn in the deciding game of their
playoff for the National League
pennant yesterday.
The tremendous blow, one of
the most valuable ever struck,
came with one down in the final
* * *

GOING INTO the ninth, big
Don Newcombe had shackled the
Giants with four hits and poured
his fast ones across with what
looked like increasing effective-
ness. Then Alvin Dark, shortstop
and field captain of the new
1 e a g u e champions, rapped a
scratch single.
Then Don Mueller followed
with a solid shot to left which
cent Dark scampering around to
third. Monte Irvin, the Giants'
most dangerous slugger, lifted
a pop foul to Hodges.
That brought up the left-swing-
ing Lockman, and he smashed a
hard double off the left field bar-
ricade to bring Dark home and
put the tying runs on the sacks,
,* * *
THOMSON PREVIOUSLY had
collected two of the Giants' four
blows off Newcombe, one of them
* * *

had not been alert on a grounder
by Andy Pafko to let a run in and
help keep the rally alive.
In other words, Bobby had
something to make up for when he
strode up there and looked Branca
in the eye. He let the first one,
a strike, go by. On the next he
swung from his boot tops, and
from the crack of the bat there
was never a doubt that the game
was over and that the Giants
had won their first flag since 1937.
The ball disappeared almost on
a line into the stands above the

315-foot mark.
* *

Brooknly
Furillo, rf
Reese, ss
Snider, cf
Robinson, b
Pafko, if
Hodges, lb
Cox, 3b
Walker, c
Newcombe, p
Branca, p
TOTALS
New York
Stanky, 2b
Dark, ss
Mueller, rf
C-Hartung
Irvin, if
Lockmnan, lb
Thomson, 3b
Hays, cf
Westrum, c
A-Rigney
Noble, c
Maglie, p
B-Thompson
Jansen, p
TOTALS

AB
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3
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30

*
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1
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0
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11

DAVE KOSLO-
.. Durocher's choice
* s0
was called to Maglie's relief in the4
ninth.
TELECASTS of tne World Se-
ries, opening today, will go to 57
stations in 52 cities with 85,000,000
of the nation's pobulation. Radio
broadcasts will blaniket the nation
from some 740 stations and be re-
layed around the world by short
wave.
The television setup will carry
over almost unchanged from
that for the Dodgers-Giants
playoff which provided a rous-
ing semi-final for the main
event. As on the last two games
of the playoff, the telecasts will
go over thefull 52-station coast-
to-coast hookup of the National
Broadcasting Co.
Gillette and the Mutual network
have put up $6,000,000 for TV
rights to the series over a six-year
span and $1,370,000 more for
radio rights.
All campus tennis singles en-
tries close at 4 p.m. Friday,
October 5, at the IM office. The
first round will take place at
2 p.m. Sunday, October 7, at
the Ferris Field tennis courts.

RALPH BRANCA
.:.two pitches
* *
chapter to electrify a crowd of
34,320 in the Polo Grounds which
had been resigned to a Dodger
victory only minutes before.
FEW MADDER scenes ever have
been seen that that put on by
Manager Leo Durocher's men as
the Flying Scot trotted around be-
hind Clint Hartung and Whitey
Lockmam after powdering the
second pitch thrown by Ralph
Branca, Dodger reliefer.
The great blow climaxed the
most spectacular pennant dash
in the game and sent a club in-
to the World Series which had
been 13/ games out of first.
place as recently as Aug. 11.
Giants supporters will concede
nothing to their series rivals,
the Yankees, after what hap-
pened today.
Until Thompson teed off to send
the crowd into hysteria, the
Giants never had been aead in
the gall game. They had tied the'
count at 1-1 briefly toward the
end, but the Dodgers rallied for
three runs in the top of the eighth.
tr

BOB TIOMSON
...money player
a double in the fifth. He had ap-
peared in a fair way toward being
the goat of the contest when,
after singling in the second inning
behind a hit by Lockman, he had
torn on to second only to find
Lockman standing there and had
been tossed out.
Also in Brooklyn's big eighth
the speedster from Staten Island

X-One out when winning run scored.
A-Struck out for Westrum in 8th.
B-Grounded out for Maglie in 8th.
C-Ran for Mueller in 9th.
BROOKLYN ...... 100 000 030-4
NEW YORK ........000 00. 104-5
E-None. RBI-Robinson, Thorn-
son 4, Paf ko, Cox; Lockman, 2B-
Thomoson, Irvin, Lockman.IR-
Thomson. S-Lockman. DP-Cox,
Robinson and Hodges; Reese, Robin-
son and Hodges. Left-Brooklyn 7;
New York 3. BS-Maglie 4 (Reese,
Snidfer, Robinson 2);" Newcombe x
(Westrum 2). SO-Maglie 6 (Furillo,
Walker 2, Snider, Pafko, Reese);
Newcombe 2 (Mays, Rigney). HQ-
Maglie $ in 8 innings; Jansen 8 in 1;
Newcombe 7 in 8 1/3; Branca 1 in 0
(pitched to one bater in nintbi. wP
--Maglie. Winner-Jansen (23-11);
Loser-Branca (13-12). U-Lou Jorba
(pate); Jocko Conlan (first base);
Bill Stewart (second base); Larry
Goetz. T--2 :28, A-34,320 (paid).

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