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September 28, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-28

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28, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THRE

I:

poliler'Brutes Defeat

Do dge rs,

4-3

I--

Major League Standings

NATIONAL LEAGUE

AMERICAN LEAGUE

-

THE MORNING LINE
By TED PAPES
Daily Sports Editor

Brooklyn Bench Cleared
In Late Inning Rhubarb

'M' Holds Light Practice
As Spartan Clash Nears

Brooklyn
New York
St. Louis
Boston
Philadelphia
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago

W
94
94
79
76
72
66
63
61

L
57
58
72
76
79
85
88
90

Pet. GB
.623 -
.618 /'
.523 15
.500 18 r v

WI
New York 93
Cleveland 92
Boston 87
Chicago 78
Detroit 72
Philadelphia 68
Washington 61
St. Louis 51

L
56
60
62
72
80
83
99

Pet. GB
.624 -
.605 2
.584 6
.520 15'a
.474 22',i
.450 26
.404 33
.340,421'

.477
.437
.417
.404

22
28
31
33

RE AL JACKSON'S BITTER indictment of Michigan football
mes doomed to oblivion by Spartan-Wolverine fireworks here
)w, there are a few remarks to be made.
my opinion the story isolated too many black incidents to give
ig but a badly distorted insight into the game as it is played
certainly there are practices which should be altered or abol-
and Jackson's accusations 'will probably serve to make the
more cautious on the field.
all the stormy shadows coiled into that sensational-type
le article, there was one topic which merits special considera-
kttention was called to the disillusionment of young varsity.
s who fail in the mad rush for a limited number of varsity
is.
* *~ * *
wising A thletes Lured ..*,
USE COMPETITION BETWEEN schools is so great, coaches
known to lure good high school prospects toward their teams
is that at least a few of them wll fit into the particular system
y rhese young players are encouraged to enroll by suggestions
they are destined for great things in college ball if they
d a particular university.
ien a boy does finally consent to play at a given school he is
ade an object of large-scale publicity, exploiting his remark-
ep school performances and bloating him up in the public
a sure fire star-to-be.
gaturally some of these young men are bound to fail in
attempts to crack the starting lineup since the key posi-
are limited. The boy who does not improve over his high
1 record is then expected to be satisfied with fifth or sixth
anonymity despite the big public buildup he has received.
3ked by feelings of self-reproach at his shortcomings, he then
s a real tragedy of modern football. As Jackson says, the lad
quit, but a sophomoric attitude of "I'll show 'em" prevents it.
Itswriters To Blame .. .
E EVOLUTION JUST DESCRIBED, it's not difficult to see
publicity hasbeen the poison hypodermic responsible for the
w Jackson intimates that the ballyhoo is administered to the
vith consent of the head coach, and this may be true at many
but I should like to take issue with anyone who would accuse
Oosterbaan of the practice.
In three years of dealing with Oosterbaan in quest of foot-
nformation I have yet to hear him use a term approaching
uperlative for any player.
is always reluctant to give any lavish praise or indications of
which might put one of his men under pressure. He has
struck me as a super-conservative along the lines of publicity,
a of his favorite phrases is, "Don't quote me."
Chat turns the finger of guilt right around at the sports-
rs who Incessantly grind out wave after wave of £'inside
and who are usually searching for a new big name to pro-
the Michigan case then, Mr. Jackson, we are the guilty ones
list assume responsibility for what happened to the disillu-
halfback last year-not your coach.

BOSTON - (IP) - Baby-faced
Chet Nichols pitched the aroused
Boston Braves to a dramatic 4-3
victory over Brooklyn today to slice
the Dodgers' first-place National
League lead to a half-game ovfer
the pressing New York Gia'nts.
The Braves, still smarting over
what they termed Brooklyn's "rub-
bing it in" tactics on Wednesday,
pushed over the winning run in
the eighth inning on singles by
former Dodger-owned Bob Addis
and .Sam Jethroe, and an infield
grounder by Earl Torgeson.
SO HEATEDLY did the Dodgers
protest plate umpire Frank Das-
coli's decision on the winning run
that it resulted in the ejection of
* * *

ROBINSON, and many of the
other Dodgers, engaged in about
the most uproarious baseball rhu-
barb of the year after Dascoli had
ruled Bob Addis had slid home with
the run that gave the Boston
Braves a 4-3 win. It cut the
Dodgers' first place lead over the
New York Giants to a Half game.
The loss pared Brooklyn's once
overpowering 13A game margin
ovet the Giants to a mere five
percentage points. The Dodgers
have won 94 and lost 57 for a
.623 percentage. The Giants, who
have won the same number, have
dropped 58 for a .618 percentage.
Washington erased the Boston
Red Sox from American League
pennant contention today, blasting
Chuck Stobbs, Harry Taylor and
Willard Nixon for 11 hits and an
8-6 victory.
* *
THE DEFEAT virtually assured
Cleveland of second place, for the
only way Boston now could tie
for the runner-up spot would be
to sweep a five-game series with
the league-leading New York Yan-
kees while the Indians split their
remaining two games with Detroit.
Boston had a flicker of hope in
*the ninth inning when, trailing
by two runs, Johnny Pesky
walked with one out. But Ted
Williams hit a double-play
grounder to Cass Michaels at
second base and once again the
Red Sox were frustrated in a
pennant bid.
Bill Veeck's St. Louis Browns,
striving for home attendance, drew
a meager paid crowd of 560 at
Sportsmans Park yesterday as they
romped over the Detroit Tigers
7-4 in a loose contest ending De-
troit's 1951 appearance here.
The winner was rookie Duke
Markell, just up from Oklahoma
City, who registered his first Ma-
jor League triumph. The right-
hander started one game earlier
and lost.
Going all the way, he gave up
eight hits - including Johnny
Groth's third homer of the season.
Senior Circuit
Chooses Giles
As New Prexy
CINCINNATI-(A)-Warren C.
Giles will bceome president of the
National League Oct. 16 and will
establish headquarters in Cincin-
nati.
That was determined t o d a y
when Giles, president and general
manager of the Cincinnati Reds,
accepted the invitation of other
clubs in the circuit to take the
post.
HE WILL succeed Ford Frick,
who last week was elected base-
ball commissioner. It was under-
stood Giles' salary will be $55,000
a year, although he declined to
comment on that subject.
The 55-year-old Cincinnati-
an's term of office will end Dec.
31, 1955, he said.
Gabe Paul yesterday was ap-
pointed general manager of the
Cincinnati baseball club of the Na-
tional League, succeeding Warren
Giles. Giles earlier in the day ac-
cepted the presidency of the Na-'
tional League.
Paul immediately announced the
retention of Luke Sewell as man
ager of the Reds for 1952. j

The daily practice chores were
somewhat lightened for the Michi-
gan grid squad yesterday as the
day for the 1951 season opener with
Michigan State draws near.
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan almost
entirely eliminated any heavy con-
tact work for his charges in the
usual three hour session that was
held amidst winds of gale velocity,
that chilled the field with a re-
minder of the coming winter.
THE ONLY scrimmage play
throughout the afternoon wasa
brief passing drill run off by
Oosterbaan's first string backfield
of Captain Bill Putich, Frankie
Howell, Don Oldham and Tom
Witherspoon.
Quarterback Putich sharpened
his accuracy by hitting both his
ends, Lowell erry and Fred
Pickard, with mostly short spot
passes.
Defense was not neglected, how-
ever, as scout Don Robinson had
the Michigan scrubs run through
some of the Spartan plays that he

picked up at last week's MSC-Ore-
gon State game. The Wolverines
were particularly cautioned to take
notice of number 47 in the enemy
backfield, who, is State's quarter-
back. Al Dorow.
BOTH PUNTING and conver-
sions for points after touchdowns
were also concentrated upon de-
spite the high winds.
Bill Billings did most of the
punting as he simulated both
the offensive and defensive boot-
er. In the latter case he found
himself kicking to such Wol-
verine safety men as Perry, How-
ell and Oldham.
Russ Rescorla will be the man
called on for the extra point this
year and he exhibited some fine
place kicking in a rather lengthy
session in that department.
Billings also took a crack at the
uprights and did well, wind storm
and all.
The session ended with signal
calling drills by four separate
squads.

* * *
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 4, Brooklyn 3
TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at Philadelphia
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh
St. Louis at Chicago
Only games scheduled

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
St. Louis 7, Detroit 4
Washington 8, Boston 6

TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at St. Louis (2-twi-
night)
Philadelphia at Washington
Boston at New York (2)
Only gaikes scheduled

-.
/11V
1~ - 1

MADE BY
Styled in rich, fine-grain to
high-light your woolens and
tweeds. A preferred invest-

tl-

fl, -/'.
H , l

JACKIE ROBINSON
. .. pennant fever
catcher Roy Campanella and
coach Cookie Lavagetto and the
exile of the entire Dodger bench
with the exception of manager
Charlie Dressen and coach Jake
Pitler.
'Campanella's eviction was to
prove costly to the Dodgers'
hopes of gaining a tie in the
ninth. With Pee Wee Reese on
third and only one out following
his double and Jackie Robinson's
grounder, Wayne Terwilliger
came to bat in Campy's cleanup
spot. The latter bounced out
without advancing Reese. Ni-
chols then squashed the dazed
Dodgers' last hopes by fanning
Andy Pafko.
Six policemen were rushed to
guard the locked door of the
Braves field umpires' dressing
room yesterday after a special po-
liceman reported a pounding and
kicking Jackie Robinson split two
of its panels while venting his
Brooklyn Dodger rage on umpire
Frank Dascoli.

VAN BOVEN SHOES
17 Nickels Arcade

I

COME STUDENTS!
Collegiate, Personality
:ir Style ... Today!
our service: 9 Barbers
No Waiting
Dascola Barbers
Liberty near State

f

All men interested in ref-
ereeing intramural touch foot-
ball games this fall meet at
the IM Building at 4:15 this
afternoon.
-Jack Hayes
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

ITS WAIER THAN EVER! n£n/ft flfi

it

4/$ th$gs to a//
well dressed mnen

MORE FUN,ToI
No tricks! No gimmicks! Takes no time- no special talent! You can make $25.
Just write a simple four-line jingle based on the fact that
WCKIES TASTE BETTER THAN ANY OTHER CIGARETTE o
(or other qualities of Luckies such as those listed below.)

;

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Worumbo

7

Ti

Favorite of the
campus crowd for
years, we have
famous Worumbo
flannels back
again . . ,
for fall.
In grey and
a whole new range
of colors and in
your favorite
single or double
breasted model.
'65 to $75

TO
STUDENTS'
WIVES

If you are a

former

Write a Lucky Strike jingle, like those
you see on this page, based on the
fact that Luckies taste better than any
other cigarette, or other qualities of
Luckies such as those listed below. If
your jingle is selected for possible use
in Lucky Strike advertising, we will
pay you $25 for the right to use it and
your name in our advertising. Lucky
Strike jingles will soon be 'running in
your paper. Start today-send in as
many jingles as you like. Be the first
to write a jingle in your school!
ad afev-
9ifore each class "0
u at
enjoy h ystr+
Relx + ood o* l -

ukFoliWs
T s,

it i nno St, e because
tee.lik ..

TELEPHONE
OPERATOR

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and would like to work
while your husband
attends the University,
come in and see us.

., ...
-.r" .

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READ THESE SIMPLE INSTRUCTIONS
1. Write your Lucky Strike four-line jingle
on a plain piece of paper or postcard and send
it to Happy-Go-Lucky, P. O. Box 67, New
York 46, N. Y. Be sure that your name,
address, college and class are included-and
that they are legible:
" Iar Tr-I

IMPORTANT:
To make money writing jingles, it is not
essential to base your jingle on "Luckies taste
better than any other cigarette." You may
base a jingle on other outstanding qualities of
Luckies such as the following:
L.S./M.F.T.
Lucky Strike Means Fine Tobacco

MICHIGAN

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1 BELL IH

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