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January 16, 1952 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1952

DANGER

SEEN:

French Indo-China Key
*1
To Red Plans in Asia
By RUSSELL BRINES
WASHINGTON-(P)-French Indo-China is a lush and bloody
peninsula which may determine Asia's future.
It is the gateway to rich Southeast Asia, for years one of Com-
munism's main targets in the Orient.
THE FIERCE CAMPAIGN in Korea began originally as a Red
sideshow. Korea still is of secondary military and economic importance
in the Communist timetable of conquest.
The Communists have made it plain that Southeast Asia is
what they really want. It includes Indo-China, Burma, Thailand,
Malaya and Indonesia.
Control of this Asiatic treasure house would enable them to crip-
ple the Western powers economically. Control would point a sharp
spearhead toward India and the Middle East and supply the Reds
with quantities of needed oil and rubber.
INDO-CHINA is the key.
Most military officials agree that if it fell a highway would be
opened to the rest of southeast Asia.
Burma has been swept by conflict since given her indepen-
dence in 1948. Thailand is too weak to halt a determined army
and perhaps too opportunistic to think of doing so. British forces
are bogged down in Malaya with a jungle insurrection they can-
not smash.
The young Republic of Indonesia is proud but unprepared.
These countries together are capable of producing 49.2 per-
cent of the world's tin, 40 percent of its rubber and three percent
of its petroleum.
With these riches, the Communists could fatten themselves. At
the same time they could deprive Western Europe of the raw materials
needed for defense and economic solvency.
BY CONTROLLING Southeast Asia, they could outflank the Am-
erican defense line, a necklace of islands from Japan to the Philippines.
American military officials say this might require an American with-
drawal deeper into the Pacific, perhaps to Hawaii.
These island bases support aircraft which alone are capable
of reaching Soviet industries and airfields in the great military
reservoir of Siberia.
The loss of Southeast Asia would tighten the noose around Japan's
industrial empire, another prime Communist target. Deprived of
markets and raw materials, Japan might be starved into the Red
camp unless given perhaps a dangerously high dole by the United
States.

$10,000 Lyons To Deliver Third
Given to U' Journalism Series Lecture

EL hhIEIS */..

ByDu Pont
The University has been award-
ed a grant of $10,000 and two post-
graduate fellowships by the Du
Pont Co., it was announced yes-
terday.
Guaranteed for two years, the
grant was awarded for unrestrict-
ed use in the field of fundamental
chemical research. The Univer-
sity may decide what line of re-
search it wants to follow, provided
the work is prosecuted for the ad-
vancement of basic scientific
knowledge and not for specific
commercial objectives.
The two fellowships are in
chemistry and engineering. They
provide $1,400 for a single per-
son or $2,100 for a married per-
son, tuition for the fellows, and
an award of $1,200 for each fel-
lowship to the University.
Selection of candidates for fel-
lowships and the choice of prob-
lems on which they are to work
are left up to the University. In-
stituted in 1918, the program is
designed to help maintain the
flow of technically trained men
and women into teaching and re-
search work at universities and
into technical positions in indus-
try.
Altogether, Du Pont awarded 75
post-graduate fellowships to 47
universities, gave grants-in-aid of
$15,000 to 10 universities and
grants of $10,000 to five others,
including the University. The
awards are all for the 1952-53
academic year.

* * *

The third in a series of Univer- LOST AND FOUND
sity Lectures in Journalism will be wHOEVER HAS Donna Hendleman s
delivered at 3 p.m. today in Rack- purse kindly return the non-mone-
ham Amphitheatre by guest speak- tary contents. Thanks.
er Louis M. Lyons. LOST-Valuable grey Parker 51 pen with
gold cap:. Call 7039. )81L
Lyons is scheduled to address TMf i
the Rackham audience on the volumes of my collected writings has
topic "Newspaper Enterprise." apparently been mislaid. It includes
my bookplate and a collection of my
As curator of the Nieman Foun- early writings. It is non-replaceable.
Will the finder please return and re-
dation at Harvard University, ceive a reward? William H. Hobbs,
Lyons acts as coordinator of the 1005 Berkshire Road, or Room 2078,
work of newspapermen awarded Nat. Sci. Bldg., Campus. )82L
Nieman Fellowships at Harvard. LOST-Green plaid scarf, Illinois bas-
ketball game. Call Tony Herbold,
He is also editor of the Nieman 2-4591. )83L

ROOMS FOR RENT
BUS. AD. and ECON. STUDENTS-Room
with men of similar interests. Kitchen
facilities. Reasonable rate. 1412 Cam-
bridge Rd., Ph. 9274. )40R
POLI SCI GRAD STUDENT seeking 2
other grads of similar interests to
share 2 rooms, kitchenette. 315 E.
Liberty. Ph. 8221. )43R
FOR MEN-Single large double, shower.
1430 Cambridge Road. )44R
ROOM AND BOARD
ADVANCED and graduate men students.
Inner springs, showers, linens, home
cooking. On campus. Phone 2-6422.
)4X
SINGLE ROOM and Board. Daily ride
to campus at 8 a.m. Phone 2-8730. )5X

LOUIS LYONS

Center Plans ,Ski
Trip After Exams
The International Center an-
nounced yesterday it is planning
to take a, group of 25 skiers to
Mont Tremblant, Canadian winter
resort in the Laurentians, during1
the semester break, Jan. 30 to
Feb. 6.
A $75.00 blanket price will cover
fare to Mont Tremblant and re-
turn, lodging, meals and skiing
charges. Deadline for reserving a
place2in the party is Thursday,
Jan. 24,
Registrations may be made by
calling George Petrossin, Grad.,
3-1511, ext. 358 or 359.

Reports and co-author of "Our
Fair City."
* * *
AFTER GRADUATING £rom
Massachusetts Agricultural Col-
lege, Lyons began his journalistic'
career as a reporter for the Bos-
ton Globe in 1919. He also has
served as reporter for the Spring-
field (Mass.) Republican.
Following the lecture, an in-
formal coffee hour will be held
in the Newsroom of the journa-
lism department, 512 S. State
St.
The Journalism series has sched-
uled two speakers for February.
They are Edward Lindsay, editor,
Decatur (Ill.) Herald and Review,
on Feb. 13; and N. R. Howard, edi-
tor, Cleveland News ,on Feb.'25.
Remaining speakers for the ser-
ies include Lester Markel, Sunday
editor, New York Times, March 12;
Forrest W. Seymour, Des Moines
Register and Tribune ,April 30;
LouisB. Seltzer, editor, Cleveland
Press, May 7; and Barry Bingham,
editor, Louisville Courier-Journal,
May 21.

FOR SALE
MOTORCYCLE SALE!
INDIA Motorgycle Sales, 207 W. Liberty.
Ph.I21748. Save from $50 to $100. )37
TWO FORMALS-One white, one yellow.
Size 10, worn once. Call 5617 after 4
o'clock. )81
DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT & WEDDING
RINGS at wholesale prices. Call 2-1809
evenings. L. E. Anger, wholesale rep-
resentative.
TAKE ADVANTAGE of 20% discount
sale. For beauty counselors cosmetics.
Phone 2-5152 between 5 and 7 p.m.
)116
U.S. ARMY-NAVY OXFORDS - $6.88.
Black, brown, sizes 6 to 12. Widths,
A to F. Sam's Store, 122 E. Washing-
ton. )118
BABY GRAND PIANO-Excellent con-
dition. Call 2-8132. )121
FOR SALE-Black Tux, size 38. Call
223 Winchel House. )122
BICYCLE - Schwin Roadmaster-1946,
fine condition. Call 2-1465. Ed. )123
CANARIES-Beautiful singers and fe-
males. Bird supplies and cages. Mrs.
Ruffins, 562 S. Seventh.)4
TUXEDO AND TAILS - Size 38. Call
2-9703. )124
REIGHLEY BICYCLE-Excellent condi-
tion. Must sell this week, leaving Ann
Arbor. Call 2-1138. )125
ROOMS FOR RENT
WORKING MAN, student: Suites,
double rooms; close to campus and
Union. Shower, hot-water. Rent: $5.50.
509 S. Division, near Jefferson.
DOUBLE ROOMS-Half block from
campus. Linen furnished, gas heat,
hot water, quiet and convenient. 417
E. Liberty. )35R
LARGE DOUBLE room, hot plate and
refrigerator privileges, Hollywood beds.
Near campus. 2-7108. )34R
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME-Rooms by
day or week. Bath, shower, television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )2R
ATTRACTIVE single room with adjoin-
ing lavatory and toilet, quiet faculty
home. Ph. 2-3868. )37R
DOUBLES and singles. Hot water show-
er. 1 block from Law Club. 808 Oak-
land. ) 41R
I 4

BUSINESS SERVICES

TYPING done in my home-term pa-
pers, etc. Phone 23357. )22B
DRESSMAKING, tailoring, alterations,
for men and women. Children's
clothes a specialty. Slipcovers, draper-
ies, also upholstering, repair furs.
Call 9708. )18B
TYPEWRITERS and Fountain Pens -.
Sales, rentals, and service. Morrill's,
314 S. State St. )3B
TYPEWRITER Repair Service and Rent-
alseat Office Equipment Co. 215 E.
Liberty. )4B
EXPERT TYPING - Reasonable rates.
329 S. Main, Phone 3-4133 or 2-9092
evenings. . r)8B
WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
TYPING -EXPERIENCED IN THESIS,
TERM PAPERS, STENCILS. Phone
7590. 830 S. Main. )6B

PERSONAL
MODERN Beauty Shop - Special on
creme oil permanents-machine, ma-
chineless or cold wave, $5.00, shampoo
and set with cream rinse $1.00. Hair-
cut $1.00. Phone 8100. )13P
WANTED FOR J-HOP--Pinned man to
go with pinned girl. Call Ann 2-4280.
)33P
14
charter subscriptions to Arch. Forum's
new mag, Houses and Homes, await
the first 14 thrifty A&D or Engr. stu-
dents to phone Student Periodical,
2-8242. $4.50 now; $5.50 regularly. )4P
REAL ESTATE
ANN ARBOR HILLS
Attractive corner lot, trees, 220x140.
Specially prepared plans available.
Owner call 7603. )1R
HELP WANTED
WAITER to work for meals at fraternity
house. Must be free from 11 to 1,
2 days per week. Call Don, 2-4074.
) 52H
PART TIME WORK with live line col-
lege specialties. Students buy)on
sight. Box 5. )53H
MISCELLANEOUS
ENSIAN SALE-Angell Lobby on Wed-
nesday.. Get yours now! )13M
WANTED TO RENT
PROFESSOR wishes to rent furnished
apartment or house near Ann Arbor
Feb. 1 to June 25. Donald S. Allen,
48 Elting Ave., New Platz, New York.
)8W'
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE TO NEW YORK on or about
Jan. 26. Call 3029, A. C. Lloyd. )23T

J

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

* ARTS THEATER CLUB
Ann Arbor's Professional Theater
Ibsen'S"Little E0yolf
0 Opens Friday, Jan. 18 - Continuous
through February 2nd.
« so >o eC omacoeoocomo

;

I1

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (11 a.m.
on Saturday).
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1952
VOL. LXIV, NO. 83
NO tices
Student Tea. President and Mrs.
Hatcher will be at home to students
from 3:30 to 5:30 o'clock, Wednesday,
Jan. 16.
Manuscripts for the Freshman Hop-
wood Contest must be in the Hopwood
Room by 4 p.m., Fri., Jan. 18.
Library Hours for the Examination Per-
iod.
The General Library will be open un-
til 10 p.m. on the next two Saturdays,
January 19 and 26, to allow opportunity
for study before examinations.
The customary Sunday schedule will
be maintained January 20 and 27. Serv-
ice will be offered in the Main Reading
Room, the Periodical Reading Room,
the Medical Reading Room and at the
Circulation desk from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Books from other parts of the build-
ing which are needed for Sunday use
will be made available in the Periodi-
cal Reading Room if requests are made
NOW
urph 60CINEMA.

on Saturday of an assistant in the read-
ing room where the books are usually
shelved.
All Students Having Library Books:
1. Students having in their posses-
sion books borrowed from the General
Library or its branches are notified
that such books are due Wed., Jan. 23.
2. Students having special need for
certain books between January 23 and
January 31 may retain such books for
that period by renewing them at the
Charging Desk.
3. The names of all students who
have not cleared their records at the
Library by Fri., Feb. 1 will be sent to
the Cashier's Office and their credits
and grades will be withheld until such
time as said reports are cleared in com-
pliance with the regulations of the
Regents.
LaVerne Noyes Scholarship-Applica-
tion blanks for this scholarship may be
obtained at the Scholarship Division,
Office of Student Affairs, 113 Adminis-
tration Building. This scholarship is
open only to undergraduates who are
blood descendants of a veteran of the
United States Armed Forces of World
War I. Recipients for the last semester
may apply for renewals of the award.
Applications must be completed by Feb.
15, 1952.
Mary Louisa Hinsdale Scholarship. An
award of $91.45 (interest on the Mary
Louisa Hinsdale Endowment Fund) will
be made for the second semester to a
woman student, wholly or partially self-
supporting, who is not living in a sor-
An intimate Theatre
Bringing Cinema Triumphs
From All Nations

ority house or University dormitory.
Academic standing, need, and citizen-
ship will be considered by the commit-
tee. Obtain application blanks at the
Alumnae Council O f f i c e, Michigan
League Building, and have letters of
recommendation sent directly there.
Applications must be completed by
January 21.
Laurel Harper Seeley Scholarship. An
award of $200 for the second semester
will be made to a qualified undergradu-
ate woman student. Application blanks,
which may be obtained now at the
Alumnae Council O f f i c e, Michigan
League Building, should be filed not
later than January 21. The Alumnae
Council Scholarship Committee will
consider academic standing, need, and
citizenship. Three letters of recom- i

Teachers of girls' physical education:
There are a number of public school
positions open for teachers of girls phy-
sical education, to begin the second
semester of this school year. If you
are qualified and available at that
time, contact the Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information,
3528 Administration Bldg.
Candidates for the second teaching
certificate: The Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information
anncunces a meeting of all students
who expect to receive a secondary
teaching certificate in February, June,
or August. Opportunities for teaching
at the secondary level will be presented.
The meeting will be held in 25 Angell
Hall, Wed., Jan. 16, 4 p.m.

mendation are to be sent directly to Student Loans for Men. Students un-
the Alumnae Council OfficedbyJanu- able to pay in full loans which are
ary 21. ,now due should see Miss McKenzie,
1059 Administration Building, imme-
diately. The Loan Committee will meet
L.S. & A. Students: All appointments Jan. 17. No new loans will be issued
with Counselors and Advisers for ap- after Jan. 17 until the first week of
proval of spring elections have been classes.
filled. Counselors and Advisers will not It is the policy of the University Loan
be available during the examination Committee not to grant tuition loans.
period. If you have not had your eec--
tions approved, report the half day pre- Personnel Interviews
ceding the time you are scheduled to A representative from United AirI
register. Election changes may be taken Lines will be on the campus Thurs.,
care of during the half day before you Jan. 17 to interview women interested
register or in the Gymnasium at the in becoming stewardesses. Women
Counselors' Table or Advisers' Table at graduating in either February or June
the time you register. Academic Coon- are eligible.
selors will be located in 1223 Angell Union Central Life Insurance Con-
Hall, and concentration advisors (for pany of Detroit will have a representa-
all students- who will have completed tive here Thurs., Jan., 17, to see
55 hours or more by end of this semes- men interested in doing sales work,
ter) in 1025 Angell Hall. Hours for They are interested in February, June
both offices will be as follows: Tues., and August graduates may arrange to
Feb. 5, 1:30-3:30; Wed., Feb. 6, 9:00- see the gentleman.
11:30 and 1:30-3:30; Thursday, Feb. 7, The Charles Pfizer and Company of
9:00-11:30 and 1:30-3:30; Fri., Feb. 8, 9:00 Terra Haute, Indiana will be here
-11:30 and 1:30-3:00; Saturday 8:00-10:00. Thurs., Jan. 17 to interview men gradu-
jating in February with a B.S. or M.S.
in Chemical Engineering, Chemistry or
Continuous from 1 P.M. Bacteriolsgy.
The Washington National Insurance
c to 5 P.. Company, of Evanston, Illinois will
-M- - - -

SIX MEN ON A RAFT ACROSS THE PACIFIC!
SJi - $lA LSSER psun
Amazing Adventure told by
THOR HEYERoAHt
omened 6,uter of the best-seler
' " - ; - xoW10 ICTCURE, uC. mead ebyrOLU NORKOAK AnArt RA. R- ..

have a representative on Fri., Jan. 18,
to interview male students, graduating
in February and June, who are in-
terested in Group Insurance Sales, Ac-
cident and Health and Life Underwrit-
ing, Casualty/ Claim and Actuarial po-
sitions. A group meeting will be held
in 3516 Administration Building at 8:30
a.m., Jan. 18.
Time, Inc. will have a representative
on the campus, Fri., Jan. 18, to inter-
view women interested in their Business
Training Program. The positions are
open in the Subscription Department
and entails no writing.
For appointments call the Bureau of
Appointments, 3528 Administration
Building.
Personnel Requests
The Franklin Institute of Philadel-
phia, Penn. has open various positions
for men holding degrees in Chemistry,
Physics, Electrical Engineering or Me-
chanical Engineering. Detailed informa-
tion is available.
The Pen Berthy Injector Company of
Detroit is in need of Mechanical En-
gineers (February graduates are eligi-
ble). This firm makes injectors, ejec-
tors and jet pumps. The candidates
are needed for development and re-
search. They should be familiar with
fluid flow, hydraulics and gas systems.
Lincoln-Mercury of Detroit has an
opening for a man graduating in Feb-
ruary with a Business Administration
degree who has a knowledge of Mar-
keting and Statistics.
The Burroughs Adding Machine Com-
pany of Detroit is in need of Mechani-
cal Engineers for their Time-Study Pro-
gram. A recent or February graduate
who has had Time Study and Motion
Study can apply.
A position as Junior Manufacturer's
Representative is open at the Harold
Blair Company, in Detroit. This posi-
tion offers an opportunity to learn the
plumbing and heating business.
The Hoover Ball and Bearing Com-
pany of Ann Arbor has an opening for
a Chemist. A degree is not required,
however, several years of Chemistry are
necessary.
The Washtenaw Lumber Company of
Ann Arbor offers a good opportunity to
a man to fill a position as a Lumber
Salesman. The job would include re-
tail sales of lumber both in the office
and outside.
The Sutherland Paper Company of
Kalamazoo has an opening for a man
as a Wage and Salary Administrator.
Some experience in this field is neces-
sary.
Parke Davis and Company of Detroit
has vacancies for Accountants. Any
men graduating in February are eligi-
ble.
Household Finance Corporation of
Ann Arbor has an opening for a woman
Typist-Stenographer.
Proctor and Gamble of Cincinnati,
Ohio has openings for Management
Trainees. Business Administration stu-
dents and also February graduates in
LS & A are eligible to apply. Applica-
tion blanks are available.
Sales Engineers are needed at the
Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Com-
pany in Detroit. February graduates of
Chemical, Metallurgical or Mechanical
Engineering or recent graduates with
some sales experience can make appli-
cation.
The Office of Price Stabilization in
Washington, D.C. has openings for
Trainee Accountants.
The B. F. Goodrich Company of Ak-
ron, Ohio has open a position for a
(Continued on Page 4)
STARTS TODAY
thiru Saturday
ROBERT
MITCHUM
JANE
RUSSELL

I

I

ATTENTION

MUSIC STUDENTS!

Before exams, play or sing your selection in
our studio and hear it back on tape. Be your
own judge!
75c for 15 minutes -
Tuesday or Thursday afternoons.
HI-Fb Recording Studio
521 E. Liberty . .. Phone 2-3053 for appt.

READ and USE
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

iL

U
U

Fi

aSCAR

I

LEVANT,

I

FRI., JAN. 20, 8:30
HILL AUDITORIUM
PROGRAM
In accordance with his custom, Mr. Levant
dispenses with the usual printed program and
announces his numbers from the stage as the
concert progresses. He may include works by
Bach, Brahms, Chopin, Debussy, deFalla, Shos-
takovich, and George Gershwin, and frequently
draws from numbers which he has recorded.

V
A

Continuous from 1:20 II
ADMISSIONS 50c

MINIATURE
Walt Disney's "Beaver Valley"

with
Eng. School
Cl N MA U ~Council
and
Bus. Ad. School
Council
present
the intoxicating
TALLULAH BANKHEAII
in
"A Royal Scandal"
with
CHARLES COBURN WILLIAM EYTHE

LAST TIMES TODAY
- Starts Thursday
ETE El U

STARTS TODAY

H

TICKETS: $2.50-$2.00-$1.50 - BURTON TOWER

A,

I

I

BERTOLT BRECHT
AMERICAN PREMIERE . A MAN = A MAN

SECOND YEAR
SPRING SEASON
BEGINS FEBRUARY 8

A

%%$2###65%522..!#%#n!M1.M#i#M....~uiMM~i#

BERNARD SHAW
MRS. WARREN'S PROFESSION
CLIFFORD ODETS
ROCKET TO THE MOON

THE ARTS THEATER CLUB -has
achieved something unique in the
history of the American theater: a
non-profit organization has existed
for a year, supported throughout by
its members, by the community it
serves. If this can continue, if this
can grow, if this can be-the Ameri-
can theater has a hope.
SPRING MEMBERSHIPS
NOW AVAILABLE $5.00

°I

MAI
CAM11~P

Wp. SHAKESPEARE

MEMBERSHIPS can be purchased at
the theater, 209 1 East Washington,
phone 7301. Also at Wahr's Book-

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t "

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