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January 13, 1952 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 1952

COLLEGE ROUND-UP:
Teaeher's Release Causes Controversy

DECRIES STATE INFLUENCE:

World University Plan
Advocated by Chiozza

ELBUINEED

t

By LONNA NLLMAN
Contending a competent instru_-
tor was, fired for "political rea-
sons," supporters of philosophy
teacher Forrest 0. Wigins at the
University of Minnesota last week
stirred up controversy over Wg-l
gin's recent release.
'U' GI" :.
To oT r
The University Men's Glee Club
will hit the road for an eight-day
tour of three states and the Dis-
trict of Columbia from Feb. 1 to
Feb. 9.
In past years, the Glee Club has
made its tour during Spring vaca-
tion, but this year the holiday will
fall during Holy Week so the an-
nual road trip was moved up to
the between-semesters period.
Among the highlights of the
tour will be a radio performance
in Cleveland and a potential ap-
pearance on a radio or television
program in New York City.
The 44 member club, under the
direction of Prof. Phillip Duey,
will give concerts at Canton, Ohio,
C'earfield, Penn., Binglampton,
Amityville and Sampson Air Force
Base in New York, Washington,
D.C., and in suburhan areas of
Philadelphia and Pittsburgh.
STARTING TODAY
THRU TUESD AY
PLUS
"PAINTING
THE CLOUDS
WITH
5U5 H1ENE

Incensed over what they felt to
be an abridgement of academi
freedom, more than 2000 student
petitioned President J. L. Morri
for "clarification" of the reason
behind Wiggin's removal.
* * *
HIS BACKERS have maintaine
the firing was affected by "im
proper concern" of state legisla
tors with political views of uni
versity professors.
A flat denial of this theory
came from President Morrill,
who insisted "there was an im-
pressive consensus of opinion
that Dr. Wiggins had not dem-
onstrated qualities of scholar-
ship that should be sought by
this university."
The Wiggins faction have re
mained unsatisfied with Presiden
Morrill's answer, and are contin
uing to push for his reinstatement
Wiggins claims he was fire
"because I was the most vociferou
radical on the staff."
ANOTHER PHASE of academic
freedom came under the limeligh
last week a t the University of Cali
fornia.
Television seems to be turnin

o At Berkeley President Robert
c G. Sproul issued a "clarification"
s notice on the University ban on
ll campus speakers. Sproul noted
s that a "member of the Com-
munist party is not to be per-
mitted to use any facilities of
d the University otherwise than as
- a student."
- He agreed, however, with a stu-
- dent Committee f o r Academic
Freedom, which recently main-
tained that disapproval of speak-
ers should not be made "merely
by reference to any blanket list of
organizations.'
* * *
ON A LIGHTER phase of stu-
dent freedom, fraternities at Ohio
- State University apparently take
turns falling out of University fa-
vor. The Ohio State Lantern re-
ported Wednesday that 36 frater-
d tiesnwere placed on social pro-
dbation.
s The next day it was announced
that 16 others were released from
a previous similar punishment.
Jc The most recent offending groups
kt were charged with extravagant
i- bills-outstanding or neglecting to
turn in a financial report.
LOOK and LISTEN
With ALAN LUCKOFF

By CAL SAMRA
If it can't be world government,
"either . .. or" reformers are ready
to advocate some sort of world
university to preserve the better
aspects of human society.
The latest of these theoreticians
is bespectacled Joseph P. Chiozza,
sociologist at the University of
Wisconsin.
S * * *
CHIOZZA, WHO is rather dis-
gusted with the world, claims that
"through intimidation, economic
insecurity and calculated compro-
mise, universities throughout the

4 _

11

Special Rates
Set for Movie
University students and faculty
members will have an opportun-
ity to see "Pictura," a motion pic-
ture shown at the Detroit Insti-
tute of Arts, at special reduced
rates.
Narrated by Gregory Peck, Hen-
ry Fonda and other well known
cinemactors, the special rates will
apply to showings at 2:30, 7 and
9 p.m., today through Saturday.
"Pictura" contains scenes from
such masterpieces as Bosch's
"Garden of Delight," a mystical
interpretation of the creation of
man, paintings and drawings of
Goya accompanied by the guitar
playing of Andres Segovia and
works by the American artist,
Grant Wood.
Coupons for the movie tickets
are available in the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs and in Rm. 206 Tap-
pan,

world are in danger of being cor-
rupted and raped by the state."
Presumably influenced by Or-
well's glum "1984," Chiozza pre-
dicts that universities, in yield-
ing to the state, shall become
"mammoth trade schools, dili-
gently and efficiently preparing
automatons for the state's pur-
poses."
He proposes a world university
to be established in Geneva under
the auspices of the United Nations.
The universal institution would
operate under this credo, drawn
up by Chiozza:
1-The world university shall
be for all men. Neither color,
creed, political belief, nor na-
tionality shall serve to bar "the
children of this earth."
.. 2-The world university shall
be a sanctuary for persons of all
sorts of political, religious, and
ideological beliefs.
3--The only tests for admis-
sion to the world university shall
be based on intellectual ability.
4--The world university should
give pre-eminent considerations to
the study of social sciences, philo-
sophy, religion, and the humani-
ties.
Rare Selections
Performed Today
The Collegium Musicum in col-
laboration with the Museum of
Art will present a concert at 4:15
p.m. today in the main concourse
of Alumni Memorial Hall.
Featured on the program will
be old or little-known numbers
for organ, recorder and viola trio.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76 I
3 .63 160 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
FOR SALE
MOTORCYCLE SALE!
INDIA Motorcycle Sales, 207 W. Liberty.
Ph. 21748. Save from $50 to $100. )37
1939 CHEVVY. very good mechanically.
$95. Call Allen, 6738.
BABY PARAKEETS, Linnets, Zebra1
Finches, bird supplies and cages. Mrs.
Ruffins, 526 S. Seventh. )4
TWO FORMALS-One white, one yellow.
Size 10, worn once. Cali 5617 after 4
o'clock. )81
LATE MODEL Royal Typewriter, 14 in.
carriage, elite type, mathematical key-
board. Call 2-2353 after 4 p.m. )112
DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT & WEDDING
RINGS at wholesale prices. Call 2-1809
evenings. L. E. Anger, wholesale rep-
resentative.
TAKE ADVANTAGE of 20% discount
sale. For beauty counselors cosmetics.
Phone 2-5152 between 5 and 7 p.m.
)116
COMBINATION tape and disc recorder,
practically new. Call3-1032-John.
)117
U.S. ARMY-NAVY OXFORDS - $6.88.
Black, brown, sizes 6 to 12. Widths,
A to F. Sam's Store. 122 E. Washing-
ton. )118
FOR SALE-Boxer, golden-brindle male,
9 months old. Ph. 3-8877, )120
BABY GRAND PIANO-Excellent con-
dition. Call 2-8132. )121
FOR SALE-Black Tux, size 38. Call
223 Winchell House. )122
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS for Spring semester. Large tri-
ple, double and single room. Hot
plate and refrigerator privileges. No
landlord on premises. 906 Green-
wood, 27108. - 12R
WORKING MAN, student: Suites,
double rooms; close to campus and
Union. Shower, hot-water. Rent: $5.50.
509 S. Division, near Jefferson.
1951-52
lecture Course

ROOMS FOR RENT
DOUBLE ROOMS-Half block from
campus. Linen furnished, gas heat,
hot water, quiet and convenient. 417
E. Liberty. )35R
LARGE DOUBLE room, hot plate and
refrigerator privileges, Hollywood beds.
Near campus. 2-7108. )34R
DOUBLE ROOM-Half block from cam-
pus. Quiet and convenient. Linen fur-
nished. Continuous hot water. Price
reasonable. 417 E. Liberty. )35R
VERY NICE two room suite. Will ac-
commodate four men. Close to cam-
pus. Very reasonable. 1011 East "U".
Call 2-5180. ) 39R
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME-Rooms by
day or week. Bath, shower, television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )2R
ATTRACTIVE single room with adjoin-
ing lavatory and toilet, quiet faculty
home. Ph. 2-3868. )37R
BUS. AD. and ECON. STUDENTS-Room
with men of similar interests. Kitchen
facilities. Reasonable rate. 1412 Cam-
bridge Rd., Ph. 9274. )40R
ROOM AND BOARD
ADVANCED and graduate men students.
Inner springs, showers, linens, home
cooking. On campus. Phone 2-6422.
)4X
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING done in my home-term pa-
pers, etc. Phone 23357. )22B
DRESSMAKING, tailoring, alterations,
for men and women. Children's
clothes a specialty. Slipcovers, draper-
ies, also upholstering, repair furs.
Call 9708. )13B
TYPEWRITERS and Fountain Pens -
Sales, rentals, and service. Morrill's,
314 S. State St. )3B
TYPEWRITER Repair Service and Rent-
als at Office Equipment Co. 215 E.
Liberty. )4B
TYPING-Reasonable rates. Accurate
and efficient service. 830 S. Main,
7590. )8B
EXPERT TYPING - Reasonable rates.
329 S. Main, Phone 3-4133 or 2-9092
evenings. )8B

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
PERSONAL
MODERN Beauty Shop - Special on
creme oil permanents-machine, ma-
chineless or cold wave, $5.00, shampoo
and set with cream rinse $1.00. Hair-
cut $1.00. Phone 8100. )13P
REAL ESTATE
ANN ARBOR HILLS
Attractive corner lot, trees, 220x140.
Specially prepared plans available.
Owner call 7603. }1R
HELP WANTED
WANTED - Stenographer, some exper-
ience desirable. Good starting wage,
paid vacation, sick leave, 5-day week.
For appointment call Mr. Larson,
Ypsilanti 3220, Airlines Terminal Com-
pany, Willow Run Airport. )50H
PART-TIME SHOE SALESMAN--Girl or
man. Experience preferred. Apply tio
Mr. Carman at
RANDALL'S )49H
ASSISTANT PORTER in exchange for
room and board. Call Bill Ryan, 2-6173.
)51H
MISCELLANEOUS
MAGAZINE subscriptions are as easy to
order as dialing 2-8242. Student Per-
iodical Agency. )6M
o8
a --o- -y ---o--y
FANO
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to the coming generation to feed
its ever-hungry talent mill, a re-
cent rash of juveniles on the big
time indicates,
Prpbably the best performance
we've seen was the takeoff on the
Ken Murray show headed by his
two personable young sons. The
youngsters, dressed as exact mini-
atures of their famous father
right down to the ever-present ci-
gar, put on a hilarious burlesque
highlighted by a vivacious little
girl singing "Too Young" to Mur-
ray's youngest with all the ges-
tures. He seemed a little discom-
fited by it all.
Murray's attempt to repeat part
of the kids' act the following week
fell pretty flat, however.
ANOTHER NOTABLY success-
ful talented youngster is 13-year-

old Junie Keegon, who has built
up quite a reputation with Paul
Whiteman and Jimmy Durante,
among others. She is the first of
a generation that America will
watch grow up on their home
screens as they watched Shirley
Temple in the movies.
Locally the most refreshing in
the long lineup of kiddies shows
is the "Auntie Dee" program (5
p.m., Monday through Friday.
" Auntie Dee" Parker .h a s a
warmth that makes her able to
talk to the children on their own
level without making the viewing
audience uncomfortable.
Tomorrow is the day NBC will
inaugurate its much publicized
early morning television show
"Today."
The program, featuring Davej
Garroway, a refugee from the
"Chicago school of television" is
actually a two hour (7 to 9 a.m.
Monday through Friday, WWJ-
TV) news program with real fancy
trimmings.
These, according to NBC, will
come in the form of reviews of the
latest broadway openings, book re-
views, hit recordings and inter-
views.
How this will set as breakfast
time fare remains to be seen. It
even might result in an attend-
ance drop in eight o'clocks-who
knows?

DAILY OFFICIALBULLETIN

Playing a
Through

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Buildingbefore 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (11 a.m.
on Saturday).
SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 1952
VOL. LXIV, NO. 81
Notices
School of Business Administration.
Faculty Meeting, Tues., Jan. 15, 3:15
p.m., Room 146.
Faculty Bibliography Report forms
are due in the office of the Graduate
School January 14.
Driving permit holders are reminded
of their responsibility to register their
1952 automobile license number with
the Office of Student Affairs by March
1, 1952.

Continuous
From 1 P.M.

o uescy

rsi r~ .;i , -. -.s a - .Jy'lf

p - ,

-4

Those students who are now securing
their new license plates should record
the change with the Office of Student
Affairs at this time.
Choral Union members whose records
of attendance are good, are reminded
to pick up their courtesy pass tickets
admitting to the CincinnatihOrchestra
concert Mon., Jan. 14, on the day of
the concert between the hours of 9 and
11:45, and 1 and 4, at the offices of the
Musical Society in Burton Tower. Aft-
er 4 o'clock no passes will be issued}
Recommendations for Departmental
Honors: Teaching departments wishing
to recommend tentative February
graduates from the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts, and the
School of Education for departmental
honors should recommend such stu-
dents in a letter sent to the Registrar's
Office, 1513 Administration Building,
by 11 a.m., Thurs., Feb. 7.
Attention February Graduates: Col-
lege of Literature, Science, and the
Arts, School of Education, School of
Music, andrSchool of Public Health-
students are advised not to request
grades of I or X in February. When
such grades are absolutely imperative,
the work must be made up in time to
allow your instructor to report the
make up grade not later than 11 a.m.,
Thurs., Feb. 7, 1952. Grades received af-
ter that time may defer the student's
graduation until a later date.
Co-op Rooming and Boarding Appli-
cations for men and women are now
being accepted for those students de-
siring membership in cooperatvies for
the spring semester. Students should
make application in person or write
Luther Buchele, 1017 Oakland. Office
hours from 9 to 12 noon and 1 to 5:30
p.m. Phone 7211.
University Women:
Mon., Jan. 14, is the final date for
registration for rushing. No exceptions
(Continued on Page 4)

Department of Speech
presents
'"THE FAN"9
by Carlo Goldoni
18TH CENTURY ITALIAN COMEDY
Wed. to Sat., Jan. 16-19 -- 8 P.M.
Admission $1.20, 90c, 60c
Student Rate - Wed. and Thurs. -- 50e
Box Office open Daily 10 A.M. - 5 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

I

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-LA - -
LAST PERFORMANCE TONIGHT
YES IS FOR A VERY YOUNG MAN
by GERTRUDE STEIN
ARTS THEATER CLUB
Opening January 18--IBSEN--LITTLE EYOLF

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Coming
VAUGHN MONROE
ORCHESTRA

Extra ---
TOM & JERRY
"Catnapping"

Iow

o~pheUCINEtf-

An Intimate Theatre
Bringing Cinema Triumphs

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1

CONTINUOUS FROM Z P.M.
NOW! All

I

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65c
Day Sunday!

Doris Gordon i uth Virginia Gene
DAY -sacRAE- ROAN-MAYO-NELSON

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Sale
A 3.50 Value
For 2.25
cy, 4. yob,.'
RYTEX DECKLE
EDGE VELLUM
PRINTED STATIONERY
Double the
Usual Quantity
200 SINGLE SHEETS
100 ENVELOPES

BERTOLT BRECHT

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SECOND YEAR
SPRING SEASON
BEGINS FEBRUARY 8

AMERICAN PREMIERE

. A MAN-A MAN

BERNARD SHAW
MRS. WARREN'S PROFESSION
CLIFFORD ODETS
ROCKET TO THE MOON

THE ARTS THEATER CLUB has
achieved something unique in the
history of the American theater: a
non-profit organization membership.
This theater has been supported
throughout by its members, by the
community it serves. If this can con-
tinue, if this can grow, if this can
be-the American theater has a hope.
SPRING MEMBERSHIPS
NOW AVAILABLE $5.00
.MEMBERSHIPS can be purchased at
the theater, 2091/2 East Washington,
rhone 711 Akn nt Wnhr's Rook-

r.

EAE AKESPEARE

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