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January 10, 1952 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1952-01-10

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 1952

I________________________________________________________________________________________ I I I

THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 1952

__ --- - - _ t

Prof.Jones
To Deliver
Cook Talks
Prof. Howard Mumford Jones, of
Harvard University, will deliver
five talks on the theme, "The Pur-
suit of Happiness," in the William
W. Cook Lectures on American In-
stitutions during the week of Jan.
14.
The lectures, scheduled for 4:15
p.m. Monday through Friday in
Rackham Lecture Hall, will cover
the subjects, "The Glittering Gen-
erality," "As by an Invisible
Hand," "Our Being's End and
Aim," "No Laughing Matter" and
"The Technique of Happiness."
PROF. JONES, who taught at
the University from 1930 to 1936,
is now a professor of English at
Harvard and was formerly dean
of the Harvard Graduate School
of Arts and Sciences. He is well
known both for his participation
in various literary organizations
and for his writing.
Some of his books are, "A
Little Book of Local Verse,"
"The Case of Professor Banor-
ing," "American and French
Culture," and "Education and
World Tragedy."
The lectures were endowed by
the William W. Cook Foundation,
which was established by Cook
who was holder of two degrees
from the University and a mem-
ber of the New York bar. The
foundation, created to finance the
lectureship, was endowed by Mr.
Cook in his will which was pro-
bated in 1930. However, until
1944 the funds were used to fi-
nance a professorship of Ameri-
can Institutions. This was done
in full accord with Mr. Cook's will.
The speakers are chosen by a
committee made up of acting Dean
Burton Thuma, of the literary col-
lege, Dean E. Blythe Stason, of
the Law School, Profs. I. L. Sharf-
man and Everett Brown of the lit-
erary college and Profs. Hessell
Yntema and Burke Shartel of the
Law School.
TONIGHT at 8
Department of Speech
Presents
( 2nd LABORATORY
V PLAY BILL
"THE STRANGER"
by August Strindberg
"MEDIA"
by Euripides-(a cutting)
_] 'SHAM"
by Frank J. Tompkins
Tonight, Fri. 8 P.M.
All Seats 30c
Box Office Open 10 A.M.
Open Daily
MENDELSSOHN
THEATRE (.
r <=o""">< <"""O<"""=<(">

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (11 a.m.
on Saturday).
THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 1952
VOL. LXIV, NO. 78
Notices
Change in Student Addresses: Report
immediately to the Registrar, 1513 Ad-
ministration Building, any change of
address during the semester.
Offices of the Dept. of Military Sci-
ence and Tactics will be closed at 3:30
p.m. today for the funeral of Master
Sgt. Russell A. Kelley which is to be
held at the Muehlig Funeral Chapel at
4 p.m.
College of Engineering-Registration
Material. Students enrolled for the cur-
rent semester should call for Spring
registration material at 244 W. Engi-
neering Building, beginning Wed., Jan.
23 through Fri., Jan. 25, and on Mon.,
Feb. 4 through Sat., Feb. 9. Hours 8:30
to 12 and 1:30 to 5.
Classification for Engineering Stu-
dents:
There will be no classification of En-
gineering students on Sat., Feb. 9, 1952.
All classification must be completed
by 5 p.m., Fri., Feb. 8, 1952.
The I.F.C. is liquidating its book ex-
change. Students who left books with
the exchange are requested to pick
them up at the Student Legislature
Building, 122 South Forest St., between
3:30 and 5:30 p.m., through Friday of
this week. All books not claimed will
become the property of the Exchange
and will be disposed of.
Applications f o r fellowships and
scholarships in the Graduate School for
1952-53 are now available. Application
for renewal should also be filed at this
time. Competition closes February 15,
1952. Blanks and information may be
obtained in the Graduate School Of-
fices, Rackham Building.
Student Advisors available to counsel
students from 3-5 p.m., 1209 Angell
Hall. Business Administration and Ed-
ucation Schools requested as well as
the departments of the Literary Col-
lege.
Doctoral candidates interested in col-
lege teaching: The Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information
announces a meeting of all PhD candi-
dates that are interested in obtaining
college teaching positions. The de-
mand for college teachers in the vari-
ous fields will be presented. The meet-
ing will be held in room 25, Angell
Hall, Thurs., Jan. 10, 4 p.m.
Candidates for the elementary teach-

ing certificate: The Bureau of Ap-
pointments and Occupational Informa-
tion announces a meeting of all stu-
dents who expect to receive an ele-
mentary teaching certificate in Feb-
ruary, June, or August. Opportunities
for teaching at the elementary level
will be presented. The meeting will
be held in 25 Angell Hall, Fri., Jan. 11,
at 4 p.m.
Personnel Interviews
The National Cash Register Company,
of Toledo, Ohio will be on the campus
Mon., Jan. 14 to interview students ma-
joring in Accounting and Marketing for
positions for Accounting Machine Sales
and for Cash Register Sales. February
graduates are eligible.
Goldbatt Brothers, Inc., ofdChicago,
Ill., will interview men graduating in
February who are majoring in Market-
ing or who are interested in retailing.
They will be here Tues., Jan. 15.
The New York Life Insurance Com-
pany of Detroit will be here Tues., Jan.
15, to interview February and June
graduates who are interested in going
into this firm as trainees in Group
Service and Sales. They will also see
men who would like career underwrit-
ing as well. After a training period the
individuals would be sent to various
locations throughout the country.
Personnel Requests
The Traverse City State Hospital in
Traverse City,sMichigan has an opening
for a Medical Laboratory Technician.
Any man taking Bacteriology, Chemis-
try, or Biology graduating in February
is eligible.
Batelle Memorial Institute of Colum-
bus, Ohio has openings for Aeronauti-
cal Engineers. Men interested in doing
research work in this field can obtain
further information at the Bureau of
Appointments.
Accountants are needed at the Sco-
vell, Wellngton and Company in New
York City. Both experienced and in-
experienced men may apply.
The Square D Company of Milwau-
kee, Wisconsin, has an available po-
sition as an Administrative Assistant
to Controller. Men in Accounting and
financial fields with a general know-
ledge of business systems and proce-
dures are eligible.
Arthur L. Weinreich of Dayton, Ohio,
is in need of a man for a Junior Ac-
countant position.
The Sun Life Assurance Company of
Ann Arbor is interested in obtaining
men to work as Group Insurance work-
ers. No selling is involved and travel
would cover Ohio, Kentucky, Michi-
gan, Indiana, and Ontario.
Calumet and Hecla Consolidated Cop-
per Company of Calumet, Michigan has
positions open for Industrial Engineers
to serve as departmental assistants.
The Euclid Road Machinery Company
of Cleveland, Ohio has openings for
Mechanical, and Industrial Engineers,
and Business Administration students.
The s. M. Brennan, Inc. of Milwau-
kee, Wisconsin needs a Mechanical En-
gineer for commercial and industrial
plumbing piping layout work.
The Burgess Battery Company of
Freeport, Illinois has a Factory Man-
agement Training Program for which
young men with an Engineering back-
ground, Statistics, Chemistry or Time
Study are qualified.
Personnel Requests
Scott Air Force Base of Illinois has
positions open for civilian instructors
for the Technical Radio Schools. De-
tailed information as well as applica-
tion blanks are available at the Bureau
of Appointments.
The Detroit Civil Service announces
positions open as Procurement Inspec-
tor (Filling positions as Ordnance Ma-
terial Inspector, Inspector of Naval Ma-
terial) Grades GS-3 to GS-11.
Argus of Ann Arbor has an opening
for a Detail Draftsman. A Mechanical
Engineer, preferably with a year of ex-
perience, is eligible.
The Department of the Army, Over-
seas Affairs Branch of Chicago, Illinois
has positions open. in the following
areas: Japan; Europe; Alaska; Okinawa;
RENT
a typewriter
and keep up
with your work

T r i e s t e; and Panama. Application
blanks are available.
The Connecticut State Personnel De-
partment of Hartford, Conn., is in need
of Junior Medical Social Workers. The
duties would consist of performing me-
dical social work in the State Depart-
ment of Health and doing related work.
Two years at a graduate school of so-
cial work is required, or six years' ex-
perience. Applicants must be citizens
and residents of the State of Connecti-
cut for at least one year prior to filing
application.
The Sixth U.S. Civil Service Region
of Cincinnati, Ohio announces positions
open as Wage Stabilization Investiga-
tor, Wage and Hour Investigator, and
Wage Adjustment Examiner, GradeGS-
7. Detailed information is available.
Chrysler Corporation of Detroit has
available positions for Engineers in-
terested in doing Technical Writing.
The job would consist of compiling and
writing illustrated articles and special
reports on technical and semi-technical
automotive subjects.
For further information and appli-
cations contact the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Administration Building.
J-Hop weekend: Social chairmen of
student groups planning parties for J-
Hop weekend, February 8, 9 should file
applications for approval for specific
events in the Office of Student Affairs,
1020 Administration Building, on or be-
fore January 26, 1952. Fraternities hous-
ing women overnight guests on Friday
and Saturday must clear housing ar-
rangements in the Office of the Dean
of Women, 1514 Administration, before
applications for approval for specific
parties are presented to the Office of
Student Affairs. Inasmuch as Indivi-
dual overnight permissions cannot be
granted to women students until social
events have been finally approved, it
is essential that approvals be secured
as soon as possible.
A house dance will not be approved
for the night a group attends the Hop.
Pre-Hop dinners must end at the hour
designated and the fraternity closed to
callers during the hours a group at-
tends the Hop. A fraternity may re-
open for breakfast if desired at 2 a.m.
(Fraternities housing women guests
may remain open during the Hop and
the chaperone-in-residence must be at
the house.) Breakfasts must close in
sufficient time to alow women students
to return to their residences before
4 a.m. Fraternities occupied by wo-
men guests must be closed to fraternity
members promptly at 4 a.m.
Lectures
University Lecture, auspices of the
Department of Botany. "What Is Zea
mays?" (origin and evolution of Indian
corn). Dr. Edgar Anderson, Engelman
Professor of Botany and head of Henry
Shaw School of Botany, WashingtonI
University, St. Louis, Missouri. 4:15
p.m., Thurs., Jan. 10, Rackham Amphi-
theater.
Library Science Lecture. "Library ac-
tivities in the United Nations." Dr.
Everett S. Brown, Prof. of Political
Science. 4:15 p.m., Thurs., Jan. 10,
Ann Arbor Room, League.
Academic Notices
Philosophy 118, Philosophy of Mathe-
matics, under Professor Langford's sup-
ervision, wil meet in Room 31, Business
Administration Building, on Mondays,I
Wednesdays and Fridays at 1 p.m.,
rather than at 4, as originally listed in
the Time Schedule and Supplementary
Announcement.1
Astronomical Colloquium. Fri., Jan.
11, 4:15 p.m., the Observatory. Mrs.
Joyce Newkirk, graduate student, will
speak on "The Evolutionary Theories
of von Weizsacker."
Algebra Discussion Group: Fri., Jan.
11, 8 p.m., East Council Room, Rackhamc
Bldg. Prof. R. M. Thrall will speak on
"Ahdir-Algebras."
Actuarial Seminar: Thurs., Jan. 10,
10 a.m., 3010 Angell Hall. Mr. R. 3,
Myers, Chief Actuary, Federal Social
Security Administration, will speak on
the topic: "Actuarial Basis for Social
Insurance in the United States and
Great Britain."
Applied Mathematics Seminar: Thurs.,
Jan. 10, 4 p.m., 247 W. Engineering
Bldg. Professor Dolph will speak on
"Schwinger's Procedure for the Esti-
mation of Eigenvaues' Refreshments
at 3:30 in 274 W. E.
February Teacher's Certificate Candi-
dates: The Teacher's Oath will be ad-
ministered to all February candidates
for the teacher's certificate on Thurs-
day and Friday, January 10 and 11, in
1437 U.E.S. This is a requirement for
the teacher's certificate.
Doctoral examination for Robin Ar-
thur Drews, Far Eastern Studies; thesis:
'"The Cultivation of Food Fish in China
and Japan: A Study Disclosing Con-

trasting National Patterns for Rearing
Fish Consistent with the Differing Cul-
tural Histories of China and Japan,"
Thurs., Jan. 10, 408 General Library,
2 p.m. Chairman, Mischa Titiev.
Geometry Seminar: Thurs., Jan. 10,
4:10 p.m., 3001 A.H. Mr. Harary will

speak on "The Number of Trees with
u points."
Conrceits
Choral Union Concert. The Cincin-
nati Symphony Orchestra, Thor John-
son, conductor, will give the seventh
program in the Choral Union Series,
Monday, January 14, at 8:30, in Hill
Auditorium. The following program
will be played: Overture to "The Wasps"
(Vaughan Williams); Symphony No. 8
in G major (Dvorak); A Night on Bald
Mountain (Moussorgsky): and a Meta-
morphosis of Themes by von Weber
(Hindemith).
Tickets are available at the offices
of the University Musical Society, Bur-
ton Tower; and will also be on sale
after 7 o'clock on the night of the
concert at the Hill Auditorium box of-
fice.
Student Recital: Archie Brown, ten-
or, will appear in recital at 8:30 Thurs-
day evening, Jan. 10, in the Rackham
Assembly Hall. A pupil of Harold
Haugh, Mr. Brown will sing works by
Bach, Mozart, Verdi, Donaudy, Mil-
haud, and a group of English songs by
Arne, Morgan, Sibelius, Britten and
Elwell. He will be assisted by Faith
Brown, pianist, Gail Hewitt, violinist,
William Weichlein, bassoonist, a n d
Camilla Heller, cellist. The recital is
presented in partial fulfillment of the
requirements for the degree of Master
of Music, and will be open to the pub-
Events Today
Modern Dance Club
Regular meeting, 7:30 p.m., Barbour
Dance Studio.
Gilbert and Sullivan Society. Meet-
ing to announce principal cast, 7:15
p.m., League.
Pershing Rifles: Meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
at Rifle Range. Bring gym shoes.
Pledges bring a pencil, since the P.R.
exam will be given.
U. of M. Sailing Club. Meeting, 7:30
p.m., 311 West Engineering. Plans for
iceboating to be discussed. Shore school
for new members.
Sigma Delta Chi: Business meeting
(election of officers), 8 p.m., League.
Business session will be followed by
talk by Prof. Lionel Laing of the Poli-
tical Science Department, chairman of
the Board in Control of Student Pub-
lications.
American Society for Public Adminis-
tration Social Seminar. 7:30 p.m., West
Conference Room, Rackham Building.
Speaker: Former Congressman Albert J.
Engel. "Congressional Control of the
Bureaucracy." Members, wives, and
friends are invited.
La p'tite causette meets from 3:30 to
5 p.m. in the south room of the Union
cafeteria.
Grad. History Club. Meeting, 8 p.m.,
East Lecture Room, Rackham. Report
on the AHA convention in New York
and election of officers for the coming
semester.
Gilbert and Sullivan Society. Meet-
ing, 8:30 p.m., League. All chorus and
principals required to be there.
International Relations Club. Bus-
iness meeting, 7:15 p.m.,, Rm. 3K,
Union.
Kappa Phi: Dinner and program,
5:30 p.m. Alumnae are in charge.
Michigan Actuarial Club: 4 p.m.,
Room 3D, Union. Mr. Robert J.
Myers, Chief Actuary, Federal So-
cial Security Administration, will speak
on the subject, "Opportunities for Ac-
(Continued on Page 4)
150 DIMES
t -
E DAY OF PHYSICAL
THERAPY

I Now

I I IIIIIII IIII ll I,,,
SIRIU P /

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
LOST AND FOUND
DISCOVERED in Audio Visual Educa-
tion Center, 2 reels of color film-
scenes including Ann Arbor, Miami,
and Havana. Probably left about 1
year ago. Contact Center. )80L
FOR SALE
BABY PARAKEETS, Linnets, Zebra
Finches, bird supplies and cages. Mrs.
Ruffins, 526 S. Seventh. )4
TWO FORMALS-One white, one yellow.
Size 10, worn once. Call 5617 after 4
o'clock. )81
LATE MODEL Royal Typewriter, 14 in.
carriage, elite type, mathematical key-
board. Call 2-2353 after 4 p.m. )112'
SEAL-POINT SIAMESE KITTENS -
House broken, inoculated, pedigreed.
$25-$35. Phone 2-3830, 2217 Vinewood
Blvd. )114
DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT & WEDDING
RINGS at wholesale prices. Call 2-1809
evenings. L. E. Anger, wholesale rep-
resentative.
TAKE ADVANTAGE of 20% discount
sale. For beauty counselors cosmetics.
Phone 2-5152 between 5 and 7 p.m.
)116
COMBINATION tape and disc recorder,
practically new. Call 3-1032-John.
)117
U.S. ARMY-NAVY OXFORDS - $6.88.
Black, brown, sizes 6 to 12. Widths,
A to F. Sam's Store. 122 E. Washing-
ton. )118
FOR RENT
FURNISHED apartment for rent. Four
rooms and bath, private entrance.
Nine miles from campus. Mrs. Carl
Bennett, Ext. 2128, afternoons. )17F
READ

ROOMS FOR RENT
3 ROOMS available for J-Hop. Phone
8949. )38R
DOUBLE ROOMS-Half block from
campus. Linen furnished, gas heat,
hot water, quiet and convenient. 417
E. Liberty. )35R
LARGE DOUBLE room, hot plate and
refrigerator privileges, Hollywood beds.
Near campus. 2-7108. )34R
DOUBLE ROOM-Half block from cam-
pus. Quiet and convenient. Linen fur-
nished. Continuous hot water. Price
reasonable. 417 E. Liberty. )35R
VERY NICE two room suite. Will ac-
commodate four men. Close to cam-
pus. Very reasonable. 1011 East "U".
Call 2-5180. )39R
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME-Rooms by
day or week. Bath, shower, television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )2R
ATTRACTIVE single room with adjoin-
ing lavatory and toilet, quiet faculty
home. Ph. 2-3868. )37R
ROOM AND BOARD
ADVANCED and graduate men students.
Inner springs, showers, linens, home
cooking. On campus. Phone 2-6422.
)4X
BUSINESS SERVICES
DRESSMAKING, tailoring, alterations,
for men and women. Children's
clothes a specialty. Slipcovers, draper-
ies, also upholstering, repair furs.
Call 9708. )13B
TYPEWRITERS and Fountain Pens -
Sales, rentals, and service. Morrill's,
314 S. State St. )3B

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITER Repair Service and Rent-
als at Office Equipment Co. 215 E.
Liberty. )4B
WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. ')5B
EXPERT TYPING. Reasonable rates, 329
S. Main. Phone 3-4133 or 29092 eve.
nings. )8B
TYPING-Experienced in thesis, term
papers, stencils. Phone 7590, 830 8.
Main. )6B
I MAKE AND ALTER FORMALS-Phone
9023, 927 So. State. )21B
PERSONAL
MODERN Beauty Shop - Special on
creme oil permanents-machine, ma.
chineless or cold wave, $5.00, shampoo
and set with cream rinse $1.00. Hair-
cut $1.00. Phone 8100. )13P
7 DAYS
left to tell Feb. grads about their last
opportunity to order magazines at
Student rates. Don't wait and be
sorry. Phone Student Periodical Agen-
cy, 2-8242 today. )32P
REAL ESTATE
ANN ARBOR HILLS
Attractive corner lot, trees, 220x140.
Specially prepared plans available.
Owner call 7603. )1R
WANTED TO BUY
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY-Bike in use-
able condition. Phone 3-1873 )13X
Read Daily Classifieds

I

,

A

STARTS FRIDAY
"CHARGED WITH
HIGH VOLTAGE EXCITEMENT!"
Herald Trib.
"ELECTRIFYING FILM FARE-.-,
SUSPENSEFUL!" -News
"STIMULATING SPIRITED!"
--World-Tele. & Sun
"FINGER - NAIL - BITING SUS-
PENSE IN EVERY FOOT OF
FILM!" -Journal-American
Weekdays
44C to 5 P.M.

An Intimate Theatre
Bringing Cinema Triumphs
From All Nations

thme
wooden
hiorse

I

Daily
Classifieds

{

Eves. & Sundays 65c
Children 16c

Children 16c

Ia10Cai'4
Featuring Genuine
ITALIAN
SPAGHETTI
and RAVIOLI,
with
Salad, Rolls, Coffee
Also
SANDWICHES and
SHORT-ORDERS

ISTPTE]

Starts Today!

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TODAY - FRI. - SAT.
BRIAN
1Phyllis
PLUS
!I ramIt LAINE
DANIELS OORE
ROE
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tam ARDEN s.:
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Department of Speech
presents
THE FAN99
- by Carlo Goldoni
18TH CENTURY ITALIAN COMEDY
Wed. to Sat., Jars. 16-19 - 8 P.M.
Admission $1.20, 90c, 60c
Student Rate - Wed. and Thurs. - 50c
Box Office open now 10 A.M. - 5 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

EDGAR SUCHANAN W VICTOR JORT
SURROUNDING PROGRAM
TEX BENEKE PRIZE SKI LARK
BAND PEST IN ROCKIES NEWS

k.

1® 'I4

COMING
SUNDAY!

Doris Day "Starlift"

Portables
Standard Office Machines
Wide Carriage Machines
MORRI L
314 S. State Ph. 7177

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mr

® ®.m"

YES HELD OVER
Thursday through Sunday
YES by Gertrude Stein
YES is for a Very Young Man
YES ARTS THEATER CLUB
Ibsen-LITTLE EYOLF.. . January 18

ENDS FRIDAY
"Better Than the Play"
--Time Mag.

1

A GREAT PLAY
BECOMES A GREAT
MOTION PICTURE
With These Unfor-
gettable People!

I

I

SL CINEMA GUILD
with
Sigma Delta Chi and UNESCO Council
Present with pride
Children of Paradise
(Les Enfants du Paradis)
. ..starring ..
JEAN LOUIS BARRAULT and ARLETTY
An extraordinary tapestry spread out in time."-Films
in Review
"Vastly unlike the usual movie in complexity of plot and
depth of characterization."-New York Times
"Tasteful direction. Superb acting. Subtle human
touches."-Life

_

i

EXTENDED"!-o.

Paramount presents
KIRK ELEANOR WILLIAM
DOUGLAS-PARKEA -ENDIX

I

-;

YES is for a Very Young Man II

Q

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