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December 16, 1951 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-12-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

I.

For your
favorite
" Jantzen Sweaters
" Jayson Shirts
" Jayson Sport Shirts
" Jayson Pajamas
" Seven Seas Slacks
" Hickok Jewelry
" Hickok Belts & Suspenders
* Trent Towers Sport Coats
0 Ronson Lighters

C

* Trent Towers Su
Top Coats
" Rain-fair Rainco
f Interwoven andI
Socks
f Zero King Zelan
" Robes
* Adler Slipper Soc
f Hollywood Rogue

for
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its and
ats
Holeproof
Jackets
cks
Sport Shirts

* * *

* * *

By ALICE SICHLER
A wrench, a rubber mallet and
a screw driver are the only tools
needed to build a whole school by
a new construction system which
the University's Engineering Re-
search Institute has developed.
Known as the Unistrut system,
the new steel framing construction
method is not unlike a toy erector
set in form, according to Prof. C.
Theodore Barson, project super-
visor. Its advantage lies in its
economy a n d adaptability to
changing situations.
** *
EASY EXPANSION and reduc-
tion of the building itself, optional
partitions controlling the number
and size of the rooms, and con-
veniently interchangeable panels
of blackboard, greenboard and
bulletin board highlight the plan.
Mobility is the keynote of the
new development. Built by the
Unistrut method a school can
be dismantled and reassembled
in a different location for re-
use with no more than a 1 %
material loss.
Fluctuating neighborhood de-
mands, new teaching methods and

Engineers Devise Erector School

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
U. of Chicago Athletics
Hit for Prof essionalismi

I

607 EAST LIBERTY
Next to Michigan Theatre

UNISTRUT-Artist's sketch of the Unistrut school developed by University researchers.
* * *4O* *4>*Q

* s S

..:.r
..:

for a truly
distinctive gift

4y

curriculum changes will all be
facilitated by the mobility of the
Research Institute's architectural
development.
* * *
ECONOMICAL from the stand-
point of low labor costs, the Uni-
strut method is a construction
time-saver. No fixed materials,
such as cement, are needed. No
holes need to be drilled and the
whole unit can be assembled with
a wrench, mallet and screw driver.
No sub-assembly plant is required
for fabrication of parts.
There is a possibility that the
United States Office of Educa-
tion may try the new system to
build . schools for construction
workers at atomic energy plants
to be built in Georgia and Ken-
tucky, Prof. Larson disclosed.
Adaptability is vital to these
schools because of the ever
changing number and location
of the workers.
A full-sized model of a corner
of a proposed schoolhouse has been
erected in the architecture school.
k* k
..STEEL FRAMING members, as-
bestos cement panels and sheets
of glass or plastic are the princi-
pal materials used in the new
system. Because they are inorganic
the materials used are rot-proof,
termite-proof and fire resistant.
Prof. Larson noted that the
metal ramp which is used in
place of stairs is a great ad-
vantage to children and teachers
alike because it scrapes muddy
shoes while at the same time
eliminating lothesome steps.
The system is designed to cut
operations time too. By decen-
tralizing the heating system, in-
dividual sections of the school-
house can be independently regu-
lated.
A system of warm-air convection
heats each zone of the proposed
school. One heating zone is com-
posed of only one or two class
rooms. Each zone has its own in-

dependently controlled residential-
type furnace installed either in a
utility closet, an attic, or a sep-
arate utility room.
* * *
WINDOWS IN the exterior walls
of a school built by the new me-
thod extend from ceiling to base-
board level so that a maximum
of daylight may be admitted to
each room. Fluorescent lamps
above insulating slabs of fiber-
glass provide a uniformly high
level of illumination in addition to
the windows.
Because it is hard to predict
the length of time a schoolhouse
may be needed in a particular
location, a school built by the
Unistrut method will be con-
structed to withstand weather
and general wear and tear for
50 years or more. Durable and
high-quality material will be
used.
Two factoryabuildings and an
experimental farm building are
the only structures in which the
method has been put to practical
use as yet.
Devised by the architecture
Sales To Open-
For BusTrip
Sales will begin from 1 to 4:30
p.m. tomorrow in the Administra-
tion Bldg. for tickets on the Wol-
verines Club sponsored special
busses to Willow Run Airport next
Friday.
Arranged to fit vacation bound
students' time schedule and ease
the strain on their pocketbooks,
the busses will leave at 11 a.m.,
1:30, 3:15 and 5 p.m. from the
League.
No tickets will be sold on the
busses, but they may be procured
tomorrow through Thursday. Bus
fare will be fifty cents.

school in collaboration with the
engineering college and the educa-
tion school, it was developed on a
strictly part-time basis by many
professors and graduate students
in all three schools.
Two of them plan to build
homes by the method they de-
veloped as soon as supplies are
available.
Book Finished
On Assessing
A handbook which will stand-
ardize assessing procedures
throughout the state will be put
out by the Institute of Public Ad-
ministration within the next year.
Professor John Lederle, director
of the Institute, announced the
preparation of the manual jointly
with several leading tax and as-
sessing experts at the conclusion
of the Assessor's Short Course.
Cooperating with the IPA in the
preparation of the guidebook are
the Municipal Assessors' Associa-
tion and the Michigan State Asso-
ciation of Supervisors.
T H E COMPLETION of the
handbook will result in better and
more equitable tax assessment, the
officialsupredicted. Standard as-
sessing practices and uniform rates
are a much needed reform in
Michigan, the IPA office said.
A committee of four advisors
will assist the Institute in prepar-
ing the manual which will be pub-
lished by the tax commission.
Arrangements for the manual
were completed during the sessions
of the Short Course for Assessing
Officers conducted last week at
the University.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

By HARLAND BRITZ
The charge of professionalism
in athletics has been levelled at
a surprise target-the University
of Chicago.
At the former Big Ten school,
w h i c h de-emphasized athletics
with the advent of Robert Hutch-
ins, the alumni bulletin reported
a $3,000 scholarship fund for boys
of high academic standing who
would be interested in participat-
ing in varsity athletics.
Fudge To Solo
In'U' Pop
ConcertTod ay
James Fudge, Grad., will be the
featured baritone soloist for the
University Concert Orchestra's
second "Pop" concert at 2:30 p.m.
today in Alice Lloyd Hall.
A new organization on campus,
the concert orchestra consists of
about 50 students representing
about 10 different schools at the
University. The group is conduct-
ed by Prof. Emil Raab of the
School of Music.
Songs that Fudge will sing were
all especially arranged for the or-
chestra by orchestration students
of the School of Music. These in-
clude Soliloquy from "Carousel" by
Hammerstein and Wilson, "The
Hills of Home" by Fox and Smith,
and "Hard Trails" by Burleigh
and LeClair.
The Orchestra will also perform
songs by Rossini, Tschaikowsky,
Grieg, Khachaturian, Walton, Ni-
colai and Coates. The concert
will be open to the public.
Trials To Continue
For 'Princess Ida'
Tryouts will continue from 1 to
6 and from 7 to 11 p.m. today in
the League for next semester's
Gilbert and Sullivan production,
"Princess Ida."
There will be no rehearsal until
after final examinations, according
to G and S vice-president, Lois
Gauger, '53SM.

THE ARTICLE stated that an
eighteen year old third year col-
lege student with JV track experi-
ence, "was the first to enjoy the
generosity of the alumnlus."
The article also quoted a
speech by Chancellor Lawrence
Kimpton at last year's banquet
for varsity and alumni letter
winners.
The Chancellor said at that
time: You men can be of great
service to the University. You
can encourage boys, of the calibre
we desire, to come to Chicago.
And you can furnish the funds to
provide for them while they are
here."
Immediately following the pub-
lication, which was headlined,
"Athletic Scholarship," Dean Rob-
ert Strozier claimed that "the
University does not buy athletes
and will not as long. as (he is)
chairman of the scholarship com-
mittee.
OVER AT YALE, the Under-
graduate Affairs Committee, ve-
toed a dormitory request to serve
"setups" at college dances.
The opponents of the resolu-
tion pointed out that the col-
leges were already allowed to
serve alcoholic punch. They also
felt that for the colleges to
serve soft drinks would indicate
a University sanction of hard
liquor.
On the other hand, those in fa-
vor argued that the University has
already allowed students to have
liquor in their rooms. They sug-
gested that the "double standard,"
worked against the success of the
college plan.
NEW HAMPSHIRE University's
Student Senate last week rejected
35-9, a majority committee report
that would have done away with
discrimination because of color,
religion, or national origin in
campus organizations.
The frater ities there argued
that "there was no vital problem
on the campus," and "that indi-
viduals have a choice of what fra-
ternity they want to join." They
also claimed that the amendment
is "in direct violation of American
jurisprudence because fraternity
property rights would be jeopar-
dized."

Tips On Gifts For
Christmas
:::The Arrow Dale"
$500

Camelet / ro, .

Gentlemen's
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... 1119 SOUTH UNIVERSITY

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I I 1 1

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