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December 14, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"

PAGE SIX

1~

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1951

THE MICHaa vIGAN D.t1

FRIDAY. DECEMBER 14. 1951

6

1

'MYSTERY MAN':
Oliphant Admits to Ties
With Grunewald in Probe

Jewish View
Represented
In Survey
(Continued from Page 1)

CAMPUS PREVIEW:
SL To Orient Foreign
Students ThroughMail

. . .

WASHINGTON -(IP)- Charles
Oliphant, resigned chief counsel of
the Internal Revenue Bureau,
identified himself yesterday as a
close personal friend of Charles,
Grunewald, "mystery man" of the
House committee's tax probe.
Oliphant testified that he had
given Grunewald information con-
cerning tax fraud charges pending
against Abraham Teitelbaum, and
that later Grunewald suggested
that he keep quiet about their con-
versation.
* * *
GRUNEWALD'S shadowy figure
has threaded its way through most
of the testimony taken recently by
the inquiry group, a House ways
and means Subcommittee headed
by Rep. King (D-Calif.).
Abraham Teitelbaum is the pros-
perous Chicago lawyer and real
estate operator who rocked the
committee with a charge that
Bert K. Naster and Frank Nathan
tried to shake him down for $500,-
000 with promises to "fix" his tax
troubles.
Among the men mentioned by
Naster and Nathan as being mem-
bers of the Washington clique,
Teitelbaum testified, were Oliph-
ant and T. Lamar Caudle. Caudle
was an Assistant Attorney General
in charge of all tax fraud cases for
the Justice Department until he
was fired by President Truman
last month.
Caudle has denied Teitelbaum's
story, and Nathan has called it "a
dirty,filthy lie."
Christmas Sing
To Be Held at Hill
Several University foreign stu-
dents will be among the 300 parti-
cipants in the 23rd annual Com-
munity Christmas Sing at 7 p.m.
Sunday in Hill Auditorium.
Guest conductor Prof. Maynard;
Klein of the School of Music will,
direct the singers as they present
scenes of Christmas in other lands.

FRANK NATHAN
... a dirty lie
VulcnsTickets
To Stay on Sale
Tickets for the Vulcan sponsored
trains will remain on sale through
Monday, Dec. 17, Elliot Cooper an-
nounced.
East-bound students may buy
tickets to Buffalo, Rochester, Al-
bany, Boston and New York. Those
going west may get accomodations
to Chicago.
Tickets may be bought at the
Administration Bldg. from 2 to
4:30 p.m.
Vets Hold Annual
Christmas Party
A small group of women from
Stockwell Hall were guests yester-
day at the annual Christmas party
of the Veterans Readjustment
Center, University Hospital.

THE JEWISH fraternity men
were divided on their opinions of
how things would be in the future
if they wanted to join a non-Jew-
ish house.
Thirty-six per cent thought
joining a non-Jewish house would
be less "awkward" in the future.
Thirty-one per cent did not think
the situation would change sig-
nificantly.
Thirty-three per cent report-
ed they did not know, or just
didn't answer the question.
Of the 22 per cent of the Jew-
ish men who had Jewish friends
in non-Jewish houses, 85 per cent
thought that being a member of
the non-Jewish house presented
no problem to his friend. The rest
thought it might be "somewhat of
a problem."
Finally the researchers asked the
Jewish men how they thought a
non-Jewish man would fit in a
Jewish fraternity.
* * *
MORE THAN 50 PER cent
thought that no special problems
would exist for him. Twenty per
cent thought that it would depend,
(13 per cent claiming it would de-
pend on the man-seven per cent
saying it would depend on the
fraternity.).
Thirty per cent either had no
opinion or failed to answer the
question.
Of all the Jewish fraternity
men, 31 per cent felt that one
of the main reasons for the dis-
crimination situations was a lack
of understanding and knowledge.
Furthermore, 66 per cent of all.
Jewish fraternity men thought
that more informal social contact
between majority and minority
groups and individuals would be
the best way to bring about a bet-
ter understanding, knowledge -
and a more satisfying situation.
In 1950 as well as 1951 surveys,
the total number of Negro fra-
ternity men was too small to ana-
lyze.
Club Will Offer
Trip to Cleveland
The Cleveland Club will sell tic-
kets and charter a bus to Cleve-
land for Christmas vacation, ac-
cording to Jules Belkin, '53BAd.,
club treasurer.
The tickets will be sold from
10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through
Friday in the Union lobby.
The bus will leave from the Un-
ion at 3:30 p.m. on Friday, Dec.
21.

A "pre-orientation" program de-
signed to acquaint foreign students
with the campus before their ar-
rival, through correspondence with
students here, is being conducted
by the International Relations
Committee of the Student Legis-
lature.
The program was initiated last
year to provide foreign students
with a concept of University life
before they came to the campus.
* * *
SIGN-UP FORMS will be dis-
tributed in the dormitories today
Bias Decision
Has Effect
OnIFC Power
(Continued from Page 1)

program . . . the IFC Human Re-
lations Committee shall (substan-
tially broaden its program) .. .
The IFC shall attempt to con-
tinue its educational program with
the Research Center for Group
Dynamics (and) develop a com-
plete and specific program through
which contact between Gentile-
non-Gentile and Caucasian-non-
Caucasian houses can be increas-
ed."
The study committee's plan,
in other words, puts teeth in
the resolution passed bysthe IFC
in Nov., 1950 (which was wiped
off the books last October) by
defining the loss of IFC recog-
nition in the introduction and
outlining a concrete long-range
program of education.
But the vagueness of the IFC
constitution concerning the or-
ganization's power poses a stumb-
ling block to considerations of im-
plementing the study group's plan.
THERE IS no constitutional de-
finition of the IFC's power. The
only section referring to suspen-
sion pertains to new fraternities
failing to improve their status but
the meaning of such action is not
stated.
Advocates of the study com-
mittee's proposal base their con-
stitutional case on a requirement
that the Executive Committee
"shall enforce the rules" of the
IFC.
There is considerable confu-
sion as to whether the IFC has
the right to withdraw recogni-
tion. The constitution states
that "all undergraduate social
fraternities shall hold member-
ship" in the IFC but the provi-
sion is not illuminated.
The question is therefore posed
as to whether submisson of a re-
vised constitution to the Student
Affairs Committee providing a
grant of more specific powers is
necessary to the proper enactment
of either proposal. Nobody seems
sure.

for those who are interested. Stu-
dents who do not live in dorms are
asked to send a postcard to the
Committee at the SL Building, Au-
drey Murphy, '53, who is in charge
of the program, said.
The deadline for signing up
is Monday, she added, so that
the names may be paired with
those of foreign students and
the addresses returned by the
middle of next week. She said
she hoped the first letters will
be written during Christmas va-
cation.
The letters should contain in-
formal general information about
various aspects of the campus
which will be interesting and in-
formational to the foreign student,
she said.
ABOUT SIXTY foreign students
are expected next semester and it
is hoped to have a correspendent
for each one. If more than 60
Americans sign up, some type of
a pen-pal arrangement may be
made with the extra names, Miss
Murphy added.
Contact with the foreign stu-
dent will not stop as soon as he ar-
rives in this country. Under the
set-up this year the American will
assume responsibility for showing
the foreign student around the
University when he arrives and ac-
quainting him with the campus.
Speaker To Talk
On Labor Politics
A new program to give students
a practical view of politics will be-
gin at 10 a.m. today with a talk
by Tom Downs, a prominent mem-
ber of the State CIO-Political Ac-
tion Committee in Rm. 231 Angell
Hall.
The speech will be part of a new
series, sponsored by Prof. Samuel
Eldersveld in connection with his
course on "Political Parties and
Public Opinion."
Downs, a member of the Michi-
gan Employment Security Com-
mission, will speak on "Labor's role
in Politics." The talk will be open
to the public and will be followed
by a discussion period.
'Guys and Dolls'
Tickets Available
Students planning to go on the
Union theatre trip to see "Guys
and Dolls" Jan. 12 in Detroit
must make reservations by today,
Union staffman Ruedi Gingras,
'54, warned.
Gingras said that only a limited
number of tickets will be avail-
able and they are going fast. The
tariff for the excursion is $3.40
including theatre ticket and round
trip bus fare. Tickets are avail-
able between 3 and 5 p.m. today
in the Union lobby.

a
a
i
i
I
t
l

U' President
Will Attend
Conference
President Harlan Hatcher and
23 University faculty members will
attend the sixty-sixth annual
meeting of the Modern Language
Association of America from Dec.
27 to Dec. 29 in Detroit.
President Hatcher will open a
general meeting Dec. 28 with an
address on "The Pure Flame." He
will be followed by Prof. Warner
G. Rice, director of the University
Library and acting head of the
English department.
Prof. Rice's topic will be "Our
Ph.D.'s-Where Do They Go from
Here?" He will also serve on one
of the group committees.
Papers will be given by Prof.
Marvin Felheim, Prof. Sherman M.
Kuhn, Prof. Ivan Walton and Eric
Stockton, all of the English de-
partment, and Prof. Mischa Tie-
tiev of the anthropology depart-
ment.
---"------- -- -- --
j I KE'S r
fPOLITICAL
ff PLANS f
REVEALED!1 f
See his campaign
schedule in

For the third time this semester,
students, faculty and administra-
tion members will have a chance
to talk over mutual problems when
the literary college conference ex-
amines the University's grading
system,
The meeting will be held at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday in the League, and
Museum To Show
Movies atKellogg
The University Museums will
present three movies: "Alaska
Reservoir of Resources," "You'll
Take the High Road" and "Men
Wanted" at 7:30 p.m. today in
Kellogg Auditorium.
The movies are presented in co-
operation with the University
Audio-Visual Education Institute.

will attempt to cover as many fa-
cets of the problem as possible.
Points to be talked over are pre-
sent evils of the system, and their
possible solutions. Topics will in-
clude the varying grading systems
indifferent courses and depart-
ments and "apple polishing."
Also on the agenda is a sug-
gestion for the "de-emphasis of
grades."
Past conferences this semester
have discussed student-faculty re-
lations and the value of introduc-
tory courses. Reports on the meet-
ings were drawn up by volunteer
committees and presented to the
college.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

EVERYONE %VANTS
DOO KS
FROM TOLILKTT'S
FOR CI~SIMAS

Lit Conference To Examine
System of Grading Tuesday

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UNUSUAL GIFTS
INDIA ART SHOP
.30 Maynard Street
<-

Get your copy today 111

Ride the
'HOLIDAY EXPRESS'
STUDENT SPECIAL BUSES
OPERATED NON-STOP
To Give You THE MOST Time at Home
Leave Michigan Union FRIDAY, Dec. 21

10%-M20% and 30% ,off
Men take advantage of our Christ-
mas specials. These bargains are
unbelievable. We still have a very
good selection of the better styles to
choose from. Sizes to fit everyone.
MAST'S
'4 CAMPUS STORE ONLY
619 E. LIBERTY ST.
I

,,,
y
a
u

From Ann Arbor to
CHICAGO
Connections to all points
West and Northwest

ONE WAY
$ 50

*FARES
ROUND TRIP
S $ 990

P

LEAVE
MICHIGAN
UNION
3:30 p.m.

APPROX.
RUNNING
TIME
612 hrs.

CLEVELAND $440 $ 95
Connections for Buffalo,$ 3:30 p.m. 5 hrs.
Erie, Boston, Rochester, Albany
Grand Rapids $335 $605
Connections to$3:30 P.m. 31/ hrs.
Muskegon, Traverse City
PITTSBURGH $ 95 $ 55
Connections to Washington, 3:30 p.m. 872hrs.
Harrisburg, New York City6
ST. IGNACE $880 $585
Connections to all 80 p.m. 1/ 2hrs.
points in Upper Peninsula
* plus 15 % Fed. Transp. Tax

I

THE IDEAL CHRISTMAS PRESENT

LONG
PLAY

MASS IN B MINOR - Complete (J. S. Bach)
Soloists, RCA Victor Orchestra and Chorale - R. Shaw
THE MAGIC FLUTE -- Complete Opera (Mozart)
Famous Soloists, Chorus and Berlin Philharmonic - Beecham

A

I

LIMITED CAPACITY- RESERVATIONS NECESSARY
INFORMATION - TICKETS - RESERVATIONS
Available at

I

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