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December 12, 1951 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-12-12

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PAGE THREE

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

P

Joe Dillaggio Retires After 13

Years in Baseball

r

Yankee Star
ToTelecast
NY Contests
NEW YORK-(AP)-Joe DiMag-
gio, who ranks beside Ty Cobb and
Babe Ruth as one of the greatest
of all ball players, announced his
retirement from baseball yester-
day.
While it was not a complete sur-
prise, the announcement came as
a shock to the nation's fans who
long had thrilled to the batting
and fielding exploits of the bril-
liant New York Yankee outfielder.
DIMAGGIO, at a specially ar-
ranged news conference in the
plush Yankee offices before news-
reel and television cameras, said
he never would don a baseball uni-
form again. He said he never had
entertained managerial or coach-
ing ambitions and probably would
accept a job with the Yankee or-
ganization as a television broad-
caster.
It is expected that DiMaggio,
who collected $704,769.71 during
13 years of playing with the
club, would take the post of TV
commentator of the Yankees'
home baseball games. That post,
left vacant when Dizzy Dean
transferred to St. Louis to
broadcast the Browns' games,
reportedly will bring $50,000 a
season.
DiMaggio, 37 last Nov. 25, said a
series of injuries and mishaps
which hampered him throughout
his brilliant Major League career,
all of it with the Yankees, prompt-
ed his decision to quit.
"I KNEW I was beginning to
slip as far back as three years
ago," DiMag said. "The old timing
was beginning to leave me and my
reflexes were beginning to slow
up.
"I began to think seriously of
retiring last spring," he added.
"By the end of the season I had
made up my mind definitely. It
had become a chore for me to
play. I found it difficult getting
out of bed in the morning, es-
pecially after a night game. I
was full of aches and pains.
"By the end of the season, I had
made up my mind definitely. I
told Dan Topping (Yankee Presi-
dent) of my decision to quit. He
asked me to think it over for a
couple of months. Out of deference
to Dan, I did as he asked.
"But I never wavered in my de-
cision. Nothing happened during
those two months to make me
change my mind."
n"rgi s s
* * *
*DI MAGGIO said he knew he
was going to miss the game but
that he did not feel badly about
that.
"Right now I feel wonderful," he
said with a grin. "But I cannot
forget those tortuous days and
nights of agony. No, I've played
my last game of ball and I have
no regrets.
HERE IS the complete life-time
Major League record of Joe Di-
SMaggio, 1936 through 1951:
Games-1.736.
At Bat-6,821.
? Runs-1,390.
Hits-2,214.
Lifetime Batting Average-.325
Total Bases-3,948.
Two Base Hits-389.
Three Base Hits--131.
Home Runs-361.
Runs Batted In-1,537.
Sacrifice Hits-14.
Stolen Bases-30.
Bases on Bals-7 90.
Struck Out-369.

Pucksters Prepare for Toronto Series

JOE DIMAGGIOj
.. . the Clipper bows out
* * *
Dt*Maggio
Has Many'
Top Marks
NEW YORK-(A')-Here are Joe
DiMaggio's official baseball rec-
ords:
American League Batting Cham-
pion 1939 (.381) and 1940 (.352).
American League leader in runs
batted in 1941 (125), and 1948
(155).
American League leader in home
runs 1937 (46) and 1948 (39).
Tied with 15 others by making
200 or more hits in his first full
season in the Majors: 206 hits in
138 games in 1936.
Most consecutive games batted
safely in one season (a record for
both leagues): 56 games, May 15
to July 16, 1941.
Tied with 11 others for most
extra bases on long hits in one
inning (two home runs): June 24,
1936.
Tied with 12 others for most
total bases in one inning (same as
above).
Tied with nine others for most
triples in one game : three on Aug.
27, 1938.
Tied with 11 others for most
home runs in one inning: two,
June 24, 1936.
Hit three home runs in one
game on two occasions: May 23,
1948; and Sept. 10, 1950.
Had a fielding mark of .9968 for
139 games in 1947.
Won te Most Valuable Player
Award for the American League
(Sporting News) in 1939 and 1941
and of the Baseball Writers Asso-
ciation in 1939, 1941, 1947.
Tied with George Herman Ruth
for playing most times in a World
Series with winning club-9.
Holds record for playing most
times in a World Series with one
club-10.
Holds record for most games
played in total World Series-51.
Holds record for most Series
games with one club-51.
Holds record of most times at
bat in total Series-199.
Tied with 12 others for most
times at bat in one 9-inning series
game: 6, on Oct. 6, 1936.
Tied record held by numerous
players of most times at bat in one
inning in World Series: 2, on Oct.
6, 1936.
Tied with 5 others for most base
hits in one inning of a World Ser-
ies game: 2, Oct. 6, 1936.
Made one or more base hits in
each game of a world series in
1939.
DiMaggio hit home runs in the
following World Series: 1937, 1938,
1939, 1947, 1949, 1950, and 1951.

Michigan's hockey team, in the,
midst of an out of the frying pan
into the fire situation, is hard at
work preparing for a ding-dong
two game series here with the
powerful Toronto Blues this week-
end.
The "frying pan," of course, re-
fers to Friday's 9-2 Wolverine win
and Saturday's hair-raising 5-4
Michigan loss in the two-game
Montreal series. The "fire," Tor-
onto, is less familiar to Michigan
followers, but after this weekend's
series the Blues will quite likely
have left an impression to over-
shadow that of Montreal.
* * *
NINE LETTERMEN are back
from the outfit that defeated
Michigan, 6-4, and lost to the
Wolverines, 9-5, in two battles
here last season. In addition Coach
Bill Wade has Jack MacKenzie
All wrestlers that can make
the 115-pound class are request-
ed to try out for the varsity.
The Big Ten Conference has
just added this new weight class
to all meets.
-Cliff Keen
and Don Rope, top performers
who played Senior O.H.A. hockey
last season. MacKenzie is ineli-
gible for O.H.A. competition' this
year because of a contract mixup.
Norm Fox, Phil Arrowsmith,
Al Conboy, and Ernie Frey, four
forwards who figured promin-
ently in scoring last year against
the Wolverines, are also on the
1951-52 Toronto roster.
The Blues, defending champions
in senior Canadian college hockey,
defeated McGill, 5-1, their first
game of the season. Arrowsmith
tallied twice in the opener, while
Rope bagged a goal and an assist.
* *.*
COACH Vic Heyliger skated his
charges through a lengthy drill
and scrimmage yesterday in the

early stages of preparation for
Toronto.
The Wolverines came out of
the Montreal series in good
shape physically, which can be
attributed to the clean, fast
hockey they engaged in over the
weekend.
Sensational sophomore goalie
Willard Ikola, who was hit in the
right forehead in the second per-
iod of Saturday's contest, shows
no ill effects, although it was the
second time in three games he
had been hit in the head with a
flying puck.
* * *
AT MICHIGAN STATE Ikola
had four stitches taken in his lip
after being struck in pre-game
practice.
After Ikola's injury Saturday
night, that held up the game
eight minutes, the Wolverines
suffered a let down and blew a
2-0 lead.
Heyliger stated he figured the
injury made Ikola a bit shy on
high shots, a natural reaction, but
the diminutive goalie was stop-
ping everything in practice yes-
terday, indicating that he is ready
for Toronto.
HEYLIGER asserts Ikola, pos-
sessed with a great pair of hands,
would normally have eaten up the
two high blasts that scored Mon-
treal's tying and winning goals.
"Taking two games straight
from those Canadian teams is
a rough job," Heyliger philoso-
phizes, "because a team has to
be up all the time." Michigan
had a one-period let down
against Montreal and lost the
game.
One of the bright spots in the
loss to the Carabins was the way
the Wolverines battled from be-
hind twice. Down 3-2 in the third
period, goals by Paul Pelow and
John Matchefts in quick succes-
sion put Michigan ahead.
THEN with the score 5-4, the

Inter-Squad
Tilt Remediest
Gym Teamn
By DICK BUCK
Tuning up for their 1952 sea-
son's opener with Indiana in Jan-
uary, the Michigan gymnastics
team held their fourth inter-squad
meet yesterday afternoon.
The Maize squad managed to
edge the Blue's by a 51-45 margin.
CAPTAIN Connie Ettl, an al-
round man, was the only one ab-
sent from the practice meet and
probably could have swayed the
score either way had he been
present,
Tom Mosiej, a transfer stu-
dent from the University of Illi-
nois campus, paced the Maize
team with his specialty, the
side horse event. In winning he
showed the form which won this
event for him in the Midwestern
Open meet last Saturday at Lin-
coln Turners in Chicago against
20 opponents.
Coach Newt Loken is casting
longing eyes on Mosiej, who will
not be eligible to compete at Mich-
igan until after the 1952 season.
The two judges present must have
liked his form, too, for they scored
his performance 90 and 97 out of
a possible 100. Mosiej is a sopho-
more and will augment the Wol-
verine cause in 1953 and 1954.
FRESHMAN Frank Adams look-
ed impressive as he won the high
bar event for the Blue team and
placed second behind teammate
Duncan Erley on the tumbling
mats.
On the trampoline Don Hurst
out-performed Stick Davidson and
Remo Boila, who finished second
and third, to help the Maize cause,
while sophomore Dick Bergmann
helped with a first place in the
flying rings event. The remain-
ing first was taken by Blue man
Mary Johnson on the parallel bars.

Michigan's wrestlers, although
blessed with a wealth of material
this year, face one of the toughest
schedules of any recent Wolver-
ine grappling squad.
Cliff Keen's matmen will open1
their regular season on January 5j
at Pittsburgh, where they will en-
counter a Panther squad which
shows definite signs of improve-
ment.
* * 4
THE PITT mentor, Rex Peery,!
is grooming his grapplers for a
better showing against a Wolver-
ine outfit which has whipped him
in successive years 25-3, and 16-11.
The following Saturday, Jan-
uary 12, will find the Wolverine
matmen at Bloomington, Indi-
ana, where they will tangle with
a Hoosier squad which is at the
moment an unknown quantity.
Toledo on January 19 promises
to be a good test for the Michigan
grapplers. The Rockets, who have
Harry Lanzi, the National Y.M.-
C.A. Heavyweight Champion, as
their captain, are entering their
third year of intercollegiate wrest-
ling.
MICHIGAN whipped them 25-9
in 1950 and 22-8 in 1951.
The first home meet of the sea-
son will present a strong Purdue
team. The Boilermakers, who will
invade Ann Arbor on February 2,
are expected to have primarily a
freshman squad. Last year Michi-
gan eked out a 16-14 win over Pur-
due after trailing most of the way.
Iowa and Northwestern will
appear consecutively at Ann Ar-
bor on February 9 and 16.
On Feb. 23 the Wolverines will
Who Launders KYER MODEL
Shirts Best? LAUNDRY
4,.

ERNIE FREY
... Toronto veteran
** ,*
Maize and Blue put terrific pres-
sure on the Carabins for the final
two minlutes, climaxed by Pat
Cooney's goal that didn't count
with three seconds left. Cooney
was off-side.
Only some great stops by Mon-
treal goalie Marcel Auger, 15 of
them in the final period, saved
the Carabins from defeat by the
rampaging Wolverines.
Word from trainer Carl Isaac-
son is that letterman Eddie May,
sidelined so far this year with flu,
will begin workouts again Thurs-
day, but it will be a while before
he is ready for competition.
Heyliger had planned to use May
on the third line with Ron Martin-
son and Doug Mullen, but defense-
man Bob Heathcott has moved up
front while May is out.

Strong Wolverine Wrestlers
To Face Tough Opposition

travel to East Lansing where
they will oppose a very strong
Michigan State team.
The Spartans, who finished
third in the Big Ten Meet last
year, are headed by Orris Bender,
their 157 pound stalwart of last
year.
Saturday. March 1, will bring
the dual meet that promises to be
:,he best and most important one
of the season.
* * .
ON THAT DATE Ohio State
will play host to the Wolverines in
Columbus for a match which will
probably be a tuneup for both
teams for the Big Ten Meet which
will take place the following week-
end in Ann Arbor.
Ohio State has only suffered one
defeat and one tie in the past two
years of intercollegiate wrestling.
And it is a credit to Cliff Keen
that both of these have been to
Michigan squads.
JANUARY
5-Pittsburgh ...............there
12-Indiana ..................there
19-Toledo.................there
C FEBRUARY
2--PURDUE ...............HERE
8-Illinois ..................there
9-IOWA .................HERE
16-NORTHWESTERN......HERE
23-Michigan state ..........there
MARCH
1-Ohio State..............there
7-8-WESTE4N CONFERENCE
MEET ..................HERE
21-22-N.C.A.A. Meet, Ft. Collins, Colo.
APRIL
18-19-U.S. Olympic Tryouts, Ames,
Iowa
THAT HOLIDAY TRIM!
Try Our
s SERVICE
* WORKMANSHIP
o PERSONAL
TODAY!!
The Bascola Barbers
LIBERTY NEAR STATE

INTRAMURAL RESULTS:
Phi Delts, Sigma Nu Gain Swim Finals

HOW MANY TIMES A DAY

By ED SMITHI
Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Nu
won the right last night to meet
each other for the fraternity
swimming championship next
week.
The Phi Delts, who swept all
the first places, churned to an
easy 39-18 victory over Delta Kap-
pa Epsilon. George Valassis was
the Phi Delt ace, scoring an easy
win in the 25 yard backstroke.
and swimming fine legs on both
free style and medley relay teams.
Stanky Sins
Card Contract
ST. LOUIS--OP)-Eddie Stanky,
fiery New York Giant second
baseman, signed a two-year con-
tract as manager with the St.
Louis Cardinals yesterday.
Stanky reached an agreement
with Cardinal owner Fred Saigh
after a conference here which
lasted nearly three hours. No
salary figures were mentioned but
it was understood that Stanky
would get around $37,000 a year.
LATE HOCKEY SCORE
Boston 4, New York 2
Read Daily Classifieds

SIGMA NU edged Sigma Chi in
a real thriller 31-26. Chiefly re-
sponsible for the Sigma Nu tri-
umph was Leonard Miller. He
splashed to victory in the back-
stroke as well as contributing to
wins in both relays.
In intra-mural volleyball Al-
pha Tau Omega took the second
place fraternity playoffs by vir-
tue of its 4-0 win over Phi Sigma
Delta.
Though ATO swept all the
games, play was close with the
Phi Sigs never behind more than
a few points in each game.
THE PHI SIGS, fighting des-
perately to the end, forced. the
final game into extra play before
ATO triumphed 17-15.
Big guns in the ATO attack
were star gridders Howard Ma-
turen and Don Fackler. Also
outstanding for the victors was
Terry pamon, who all through
play contributed spectacular
saves and perfect set-ups.
Captain Bob Blumenthal andl
Phil Barad shined for the losers.

In the third place playoffs Delta
Chi, sparked by the play of big
Jim Cape, took the measure of
Phi Kappa Tau, 4-2. Outstanding
for the losers was Don Waatti.
Fraternity bowling has started
and 22 teams have already rolled
qualifying rounds. The highest
team score yet reported, 2554, is
that of Theta Xi. They are close-
ly followed by Sigma Alpha Mu,
the defending champs, with 2512
pins, Phi Kappa Psi with 2425
pins, and Phi Delta Theta with
2405 pins.
LAST NIGHT'S SCORES
VOLLEYBALL
ATO 4, Phi Sigma Delta 0
Aeronautic Engineers 3, Museum 3
Romance Languages 6, Engineering
Mechanics 0
Zoology 5, Rockets 1
Public Health 4, Navy 2
Delta Chi 4, Phi Kappa Tau
HANDBALL
Pi Lambda Phi 2, Acacia 1
Delta Tau Delta 3, Chi Psi 0
MCF 3, Foresters 0
Roger Williams 3, Hawaiians 0
Newman 3, Wesleyan 0
SWIMMING
Phi Delta Theta 39, Delta Kappa
Epsilon 18
Sigma Nu 31, Sigma Chi 26

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