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December 08, 1951 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1951

i U

FOREIGN STUDENT SAYS:
Comfort, OptimismMark U.S. Culture

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
fourth in a series of articles on how
Americans appear to foreign students.
The writer, a Fulbright scholar} was
formerly on the editorial staff of
Corrieri di Napoli, a prominent Nea-
politan daily.)
. By ALDO CANONICI
When our ships enter the port of
New York, we get our first im-
pression of the fabulous mechani-
cal civilization in America.
This happens in most cases at
the day break. Rockefeller Center
is hardly visible and the sky-
scrapers appear and disappear be-
cause of the fog. We are usually on
deck and are amazed by the ter-
rific number of cars silently run-
ning at our right side along the
'green coast of Long Island. Lines
and lines practically endless.
* * *
THIS IS only the first but surely
not the most impressive demon-
stration of the high standard of
living in the United States.
The fact that here almost
everybody, with theexee'ption of
a small number of the humblest
workers, is able to have cars, TV,
refrigerators and all kinds of
comforts does not mean very
much to the American, because
he was born in this country and
has become accustomed to it.
But for us, even if we come from
the biggest cities of Europe and

South America, this is a very
remarkable impression.
Also in this overcrowded 20th
century the possibility of improv-
ing his own level of life is almost
boundless for the citizen of the
United States. The problem of
findifng a good job in our countries,
even if we possess a Ph.D. degree
and offer fluent knowledge of a
couple of foreign languages is
always a hard task. Most Ameri-
cans, on the contrary, face an
open future.
* * *
THESE conditions, of course,
deeply influence the American
character. The fact that this coun-
try was able to overcome in a few
decades all kinds of difficulties
and acquire so important a role
in today's world has produced self-
confident people.
Their optimistic views are at
opposite poles with the skept-
cism of the Latin race. Ameri-
cans are a youthful people who
tremendously enjoy and applaud
Walter Disney's cartoons as
children, but who believe in life.
An amazing land where people
of every origin are perfectly amal-
gamated and where 256 churches
can live in harmony. What a dif-
ference from what is still happen-
ing in Europe. Petty rivalries and

jealousies
there.

have the advantage!

p
t
.

It is my opinion, which prob-
ably few Europeans will have the
courage to agree with me, that
in terms of social behavior
Americans are far better than
we are.
But we have now to face two
paradoxes. The first is that a na-
tion where the human being has
his highest recognition, is also a
strictly conformist country. The
high level of living that is due to
large scale production also brings
a complete standardization. In-
dividuality is compressed by the
masses and we find some patterns
which serve as a model for every-
thing else.
No foreigner could easily dis-
tinguish Ann Arbor from any
other Mid-west town or his house
from his neighbor's: they are as
similar as two drops of water.
Everywhere the same records the
identical tunes twice, three times a
day; the same food precooked in
millions of cans. This standardi-
4ation invades every field of life
jeopardizing criticism.
THE SECOND and more re-
markable paradox is that in the
United States, a country with so
high a standard of living, a very
few persons are really able to en-
joy all of the comforts they have.
They have no time.
It is not strange to hear sen-
tences like this: "I never had a
vacation in my life" or."I don't
know what a vacation is." Ameri-
cans should surely be happy with
all they possess, but it does not
seem to be so.
Mechanization, conformism and
a lack of leisure time have almost
have almost destroyed the pleasure
of a simple life. Even the car has
many times to be considered a
trouble. When- somebody is com-
pelled to search 20 minutes for a
parking place, he will finally tell
you: "I really envy a man who can
do without a car;" then you un-
derstand him.
All these seem to be paradoxes
for us, but nothing can be consid-
ered impossible in a country where
anything is possible.
(NEXT: American men and women.)

Men's Dorms
Hit ByThefts
Thefts in the men's residence
halls amounting to over $350 were
reported yesterday by the police.
Three typewriters valued at $100
or more apiece have been stolen
this semester from Allen-Rumsey
residents in the West Quad.
The other thefts occurred in
Gomberg House in the South Quad
where $40 was stolen from the
locked room of a student this week
and $23 was removed from an-
other room two weeks ago.
Investigation of the robberies is
still under way, according to po-
lice. None of them have been
solved.

STOP

*

____ _ _

running
yourself
ragged!
Time is money!
Save time by using
our convenient
BANK BY MAIL
service, designed
to s-t-r-e-t-c-h
)our valuable time.

*

_1

Galen s
CHRISTMAS
DRIVE
Dec. 7-8, 1951

Inspire ofat an of our thre'e o1ffices

-Daily--L. Wil
EVEN SWAP?-Lee Johnson, '54, examines George Chatas' uke
and clarinet as he contemplates making a trade for his bicycle at
the Union's "Swap Shop."
0i
Union Swap Shop Bargains
Over East 'QuadAir Waves

THE ANN ARBOR BANK
Main and Huron Sts.
State Street at Nickels Arcade 1108 South University

*

*~*~r ***

--

11

Anti-Inflationary Measures
Cited by Prof. McCracken

i1
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j
A

Consumers need not fear infla-
tion in 1952 if savings continue at1
the same high level as in 1951,
Prof. Paul W. McCracken of the
business administration school
said.
Prof. McCracken addressed 200
Michigan bankers yesterday at a
luncheon meetiig which conclud1-
ed the two day Bank Study Con-
ference sponsored by the Michi-
gan Banklers' Association and the
School of Business Administration.
Campus
Calendar
Events Today'
AFRICAN UNION-The recent-
ly formed African Union Organi-
zation will hold an open house
from 8:30 p.m. to midnight at the
Internatioial Center of the Union.
* * *
BRITISH STUDENTS - The
Beacon Association, composed of
students from the British Empire
and Commonwealth of Nations,
will hold a discussion at noon in
they League.
s s
Events Tomorrow
ZIONIST MEETING-Leon Hay
of Detroit will speak on "Economic
Problems of Israel" at a meeting
of the Intercollegiate Zionist Fed-
eration of America at 7:30 p.m. in
the League..
LinguistiC Society
To Convene Here
Representatives from Wayne
University, Michigan State Nor-
mal, Michigan State College and
the University of Michigan will
gather today for a meeting of the
Michigan Linguistic Society.
They will first attend a luncheon
at 12,:30 p.m. in the Anderson Rm.
of the Union and then hold an
open meeting at Rm. 3-S in the
Union where Prof. Hayward Ken-
iston will welcome the group.
Speakers at the meeting will be
Dr. Raven McDavid, member of
the Linguistic Atlas of the United
States and Canada, Prof. Lawrence
B. Kiddle of the Spanish depart-
ment, while Prof. Charles C. Fries
of the English department will
lead a panel discussion. The two
speakers will present papers con-
cerning various phases of language
characteristics.

ACCORDING TO Prof. McCrac-
ken, consumers saved twice as
much as usual during 1951. The
1952 situation will depend on the
amount 9f thrift exercised in re-
gard to the income dollar.
Government officials warned
that inflationary measures may
become an important problem
next year when the federal bud-
get may rise to more than $80
billion.
' On the other side of the picture,
he cited four anti-inflationary fac-
tdrs:
1. An expected $15 billion in-
ckease in our capacity to produce.
2. An expected $3 billion decline
in -residential building.
3. Indications that business ex-
penditures for new plants and
equipment will not continue at the
present strong levels.
4. The fact that many consumer
markets seem pretty well saturat-
ed.
"The result of all this is that
the dollar volume of the American
economy's output will rise from
about $325 billions this year to
$340 billions for 1952," Prof. Mc-
Cracken said. But the rise in dol-
lar output will be largely a rise
in real production with the price
level relatively stable.
Student Players
To Hold- Auditions
Tryouts for the Student Players
production of Maxwell Anderson's
"Joan of Lorraine" will be held at
7:30 p.m. tomorrow through Tues-
day in the League.
The production is scheduled for
a five-performance run beginning
February 20.
All students interested in the
production are eligible to tryout.
Marie D. Miller, Players director,
emphasized that no experience is
necessary.
Dairy Bar Ends
Price Cut Trial
The local price rollback to 1939
levels conducted by Thompson's
Dairy Bar ended its 10-day trial
period yesterday.
Proprietor Tom Thompson was
not available for comment on how
successful the experiment had
been or whether the cut-price
menus would continue.
The roll-back action was re-
sponsible for anxiety among local
restaurant owners over a possible
price war.

1

The Union "Swap Shop" has incongruous items. To round out
taken to the air waves. I the show Williams spins records
A campus tradition for many requested by the listeners.
years through the media of the Union Councilman Jack Eh-
Union lobby bulletin board, the lers, '53E, who is in charge of
mythical "swap shop" is now being the project explained that the
featured on its own disc jockey program was started when he
show on the East Quad radio net- noticed that the bulletin boards
work. were becoming overloaded with
* "swap notices."
DISK JOCKEY Don Williams "We felt that if all those people
reads the notices of offers to trade would take the trouble to put their
anything from a baby parakeet notices on the board, then come
to a 1929 Ford in return for equally each day to see if someone wanted
their "white elephants," that many
more would probably like to make
Special Masses similar trades-if they only had
to sit and listen to their radios.
Rev. Fr. Frank McPhillips an- Ehlers said that anyone who has
nounced yesterday that special any trading bait may mail a card
masses for the Feast of the Im- to the Union student offices with
maculate Conception would be his name, address, a description of
held at 7 a.m., 8 a.m., 9 a.m., and the item they would like to trade
noon today at St. Mary's Student and any particular item they'd
Chapel. like in return.

RONSON
LIGHTERS
All gifts purchased
4
from
grcade Jewelry
shop
S&S iv1ered Sewters*A~ercwa Gemsft;
ENGRAVED,
no additional charge
(Engraving same
day on request)

HENRY ARTIN OLOUD

I

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I i'7CTL'RL S

I

presenti
DR. MORDECAI W. JOHNSON
President, Howard University
SUnday. December 9, 1951

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Subject-God the Only Cause and Creator.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339
South Main Street where the Bible and all
authorized Christian Science literature may be
read, borrowed, or purchased.
This room is open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.; Fridays 7-9
P.M., Saturday 3-5 P.M.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leosard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Veruin.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y. M. C.. A. Auditorium
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning service.
7:00 P.M'.: Sunday evening service.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, Universal Bible Sunday
sermon by the pastor, "You Need the nique!"
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper-Program.
Friday at 8:00: Annual Chapel Christmas Party.

10:45 Worship Service, "The Hour Is At Hand."
in the Sanctuary of the First Methodist Church.
8:15 P.M. "The Negro and Our National Destiny."
at Rackham Assembly Hall.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship (Nursery for chil-
dren). Sermon: "The Word within the Words."
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Student Guild House, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Marilynn Paterson, Assistant
STUDENT GUILD: 6:00 P.M. supper and 6:45
program. Prof. Kenneth Boulding will speak on
"The Constructive Role of the Non-Conformist
in Society."
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill & Forest Ave. Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:20 A.M.: Bible Class at Center.
10:30 A.M.: Trinity Church-10:45 Zion Church
5:30 P.M.: Supper Meeting at Center-
Program 7:00.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
and The Episcopal Student Foundation
North Division at Catherine
The Reverend Henry Lewis, S.T.D., Rector
The Reverend Ellsworth E. Koon, Curate
The Reverend Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain
Miss Ada May Ames, Cunsellor for Women
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast, Canterbury House)
11:00 A.M. Church School (nursery - 9th grade)
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev-
erend Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain
12:15 P.M. After-Service Fellowship
5:30 P.M. Canterbury Club. Speaker: the Rev-
erend Kenneth Mann
6:30 P.M. High School Club
6:45 P.M. Seminar on Christian Living
8:00 P.M. Choral Evening Prayer
Wednesday, 7:30 A.M. Holy Communion (fol-
lowed by Student Breakfast)
Friday, 7:00 A.M. Holy Communion (followed by
Student Break ist)
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Phares Steiner, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Church School and Adult Group.
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship followed by Con-
ference on "Functions, and Functioning, of a
Liberal Church. Fellowship Dinner at 12:15.
Further proceedings, with children separately
entertained.
7:00 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group at Lane
Hall with Rabbi Herschel Lyman on: "Unitar-
ianism and Judaism."
THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
in Ann Arbor
736 South State Street
Wednesday, 8 P.M.
Open Class
"The Study of Life"
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Director Student Work, Rev. H. L. Pickerill,
Marilyn Paterson
Director of Music, Wayne Dunlop; Organist,
Howard R. Chase.
Director Church School, Mrs. Gertrude Couch
10:45 A.M. All Departments of Church School
10:45 A.M. Public Worship, Dr. Parr will preach
on "FAILING SUCCESSFULLY"
6:00 P.M. Student Guild Supper at Memorial
Christian Church. Prof. Kenneth Boulding
will speak on "The Constructive Role of the
Non-Conformist in Society."

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Have YOU heard?

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon, D.D., Pastor Emeritus
John Bathgate, Minister to Students
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
Sermon Topic: "Great Expectations." Advent
sermon.
Westminster Guild Program: A Christmas program.
Readings by Ruth Mohr.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 Soutli State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: .Breakfast Seminar. Pine Room.
10:45 P.M.: Worship, Dr. Mordecai Johnson,
President of Howard University, Loud Lecturer
will speak on "The Hour Is At Hand."
4:15 P.M.: Bible Study Group, Green Room.
5:30 P.M.: Supper and Fellowship.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program.
8:15 P.M.: Dr. Mordecai W. Johnson will speak
at the Rackhom Assembly Hall on "The Negro
and Our National Destiny."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open Daily!
THE VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
(Interdenominational)
University Community Center Chapel
Willow Run
Reverend Blaise Levai, Pastor
10:45 A.M. Divine Worship
Sermon-"Come and Praise Him"
10:45 A.M. Church School and Worship
7:00 P.M. Free Movie, "The Apostle"

_~ I

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TIME

f

PLEASURE
SIf you come and
do your foundry with
us. An 8 lbs. food

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for 6c.
'@ Just drop it off
* We will WASH,
DRY, and Fold your

THE SALVATION ARMY
22t East Washington... Phone 8353
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M. Sunday School
11:15 A.M.: Morning Worship Service
6:30 P.M.: Young People's Service
7:45 P.M.: Evening Worship Service
Wednesday Evening

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