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December 08, 1951 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-12-08

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE 7

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
U

PAGE 1

RETURN ENGAGEMENT TONIGHT:

ELIIK

Keyes,

Chin

Star in

M'Wmin

SPEAKING
- of
BY GEORGE FLINT

JT WAS A distinctly different set of circumstances but somehow a
more sincere and moving atmosphere, that greeted the Michigan
football team at the annual Grid Bust given by the University of
Michigan Club Thursday night.
An odd and somewhat cynical high school football coach used to
say that during winning seasons you build public relations; during
mediocre seasons you build for next year; during losing seasons you
build character.
THE WOLVERINES, after three straight conference champion-
ships under Bennie Oosterbaan, sat down at the banquet table in
Detroit with a losing season at their backs. Strangely enough, they
were happy about it.
It was a quiet and sincere kind of happiness, wrought by a feeling
that each athlete had done his utmost and had at the same time
earned the respect of those who knew him best. Coach Bennie Ooster-
baan, in his direct and forceful way, sounded the keynote at the
evening's end.
"These men gave the best that they had, and a little more. I
have always tried above all other things to build up a relationship of
friendship among the coaches, the players and myself, and that re-
lationship is more important to them and to me than winning football
games."
* * * *
Look to the Future
{
OOSTERBAAN also stated something which might astound the
current critics of Michigan football. Addressing a number of high
school athletes present in the ball room of the Statler Hotel, where
the bust was held this year, Oosterbaan quietly and unequivocally told
them not to come to Michigan if they did not feel that it offered the
things which would be valuable to them ten or fifteen or twenty years
from now.
"We are interested in any of you who desire to come to Michi-
gan. We welcome you with open arms. But we are not engaging
in a bidding contest with anyone. The important thing for you
to think about when you choose your institution is the type of
education it can give you. That is the fact which will guide your
future."
University President Harlan H. Hatcher paid tribute to the
Michigan coach as a teacher of young men, stressing the fact that
football, as all extra-curricular activities at Michigan, is part of the
learning process.
The bust produced a number of moving moments, but there were
light ones too. Don Peterson, the team's most valuable player and
possessor of the second highest scholastic average, found platform
oratory a bit too much for him. His comment when he received the
traditional 'M' ring awarded to senior letterwinners: "I'm lumped."
S* * * *0
The Michigan Mixture
'A ND TOM KELSEY, who won the George C. Patterson award for
a scholastic average exceeding B plus, recalled why he switched
to Michigan from Ohio State. "The Touchdown Club down there tries
to run the team. The alumni at Michigan don't do that." This speech
produced sighs of satisfaction from the several hundred alumni pres-
ent.
Captain Bill Putich, called by Oosterbaan the man who in all
the years (27) the former All-American has been at Michigan "gave
the most of what he had in every game," read a letter from the entire
Michigan team which stressed the love of the game and the lack
of any pressure in the direction of an undue "will to win" in the
Wolverine lair.
0 0 0 *
IT REMAINED for tackle Tom Johnson, a three-year regular and
one of the most soft-spoken members of the team, to sum up the true
worth of football to the players themselves. "After that last game,
when you realize that you won't be playing ball for Michigan again, it
sort of leaves a space in your daily routine. You go to classes, and in the
afternoon you sit around, and three o'clock comes, and you feel like
you ought to be down at the field. You go down to the training room,
and they tell you it's closed to football players-the basketball players
have taken over. I'll always remember Michigan and Michigan foot-
ball. If I get married and have some kids, they're only going to come
to one college-Michigan."
Listening to the men of Michigan who spoke at the head table,
the feeling that character in the highest degree was the main object
of football at Michigan pervaded the sometimes raucous, sometimes
quiet atmosphere of the banquet hall. Perhaps some of the charges
brought against intercollegiate football are true. But the loyalty to
coaches and team displayed by alumni at Detroit Thursday proved
that it isn't necessary to win every year, at least at Michigan.
They're still champs in my book.

Frosh Rule
Voted Bach
By Big Ten
CHICAGO-(IP)-The Big Ten
today decided to ban freshman
athletes from varsity competition
at the end of the school year and
heard its football coaches approve
spring grid practice.
The policy-making faculty re-
presentatives, at the second-day
session of the league's annual win-
ter meeting, revoked a waiver of a
one-year residence rule for fresh-
man athletes.
* * *
THAT MEANS, beginning next
fall, freshmen will have to wait
until their sophomore year for var-
sity eligibility.
This year, because of fears
that military inroads would de-
plete campuses of athletic talent,
freshmen were allowed to join
varsity squads.
Minnesota,for instance, had
a half-dozen frosh considered
first-line varsity footballers,
while Wisconsin's fullback Alan
Ameche was the leading confer-
ence rusher as a freshman.
The football coaches, meeting
with the athletic directors, ex-
pressed the opinion that, as the
conference conducts it, there is
nothing wrong with spring prac-
tice. The National Collegiate Ath-
letic Association's council has re-
commended elimination of spring
practice or a limit of 20 sessions.
The Big Ten has no limit.
* * *
THE ATHLETIC directors, con-
sidering the possibility of curtail-
ing length of sports seasons, de-
cided to hear recommendations
from coaches of all sports on what
they consider proper limits.
In abandoning the one-year res-
idence rule, the faculty representa-
tives agreed that "there is nothing
in the present situation which
makes further waiver of the fresh-
man rule advisable."
AP Briefs
NEW YORK - (1P) - Coach
Charles (Chuck) Taylor, who put
his Stanford Indians into the Rose
Bowl in his first season as a head
coach, was named Football Coach
of the Year today.
Taylor, who succeeds Charles
Caldwell of Princeton as Coach
of the Year, was an All-America
guard at Stanford in 1942.
* . *0
NEW YORK-P)-Judge Saul
S. Streit, big-time basketball's
stern critic, suspended sentence on
three former Bradley University
stars today, blaming their college
president for their "moral debase-
ment."
THE THREE, All-America Eu-
gene (Squeaky) Melchiorre,. 24,
William Mann, 24, and George
(Mike) Chidnakis, 26, tried to fix a
1949 game at Madison Square
Garden with Bowling Green.

Y

* * *

Cooney Also
Leads Attack
Ikola Shines In Nets;
Registers 27 Saves
(Continued from Page 1)

EARL KEYES
. . four point man
IM All-Star
Grid Squads
MadePublic
By DICK LEWIS
Twenty-three football players,
were chosen on the annual intra-
mural all-star team yesterday,
with seven of the lot coming from
championship organizations.
Fraternity all-stars were divid-
ed among seven different teams.
Howie Maturen, ATO passing ace,
Moe Katz, Tau Delta Phi's one
man gang, Milt Heath, Delta Sig-
ma Phi standout, and Jerry Rov-
ner, Pi Lambda Phi's repeat selec-
tion, made up the backfield.
* * * '
LINEMEN on the fraternity unit
include Don Johnson of Sigma Phi,
Earl Keim of the Phi Ilelts, and
Sigma Chi's Paul Fancher.
Three residence halls placed
two men each on the honor
squad. Champion Wenley was
represented by it diminutive
quarterback, Warren Wertheim-
er, and Jim McCormick, a glue-
fingered end.
Lineman Erwin Kleizaert and
back Dick Dennis of finalist Hay-
den House, and Fletcher's Leach
brother combination, Dick the
lineman and Bob the back, gained
recognition for their outstanding
play.'
LEO EFIMCHIK, a brilliant
lineman from Kelsey, Gomberg's
Dick Donahue, another forward
wall stalwart, and back Bob
Szczarba of Huber were also
named on the combine.
Wesleyan, the independent
football champions, placed end
Ed Wolven and back Cliff Heller
on the dream team. All-stars
named from the Rumpots were
backs Frank Putich and Joe
Cassis.
Linemen Bob Spencer and Dave
West of the M.C.F. and Foresters
respectively, and back John Fush-
man of the Newman Club rounded
out the star-studded seven.

Heathcott was serving a trip-
ing penalty at 18:10 of the sec-
ond stanza, but the Wolverines
had already added three goals
to Chin's first perio dscore and
they led, 4-1, after Quesnel's
tally.
Jean Bruneau picked up the
other Carabin marker in the midst
of Michigan's third period five-
goa l barrage.
*; * *
AFTER CHIN'S initial marker,
play opened up and the Wolver-
ines scored what proved to be the
winning goals in lightning fashion
halfway ,through the second per-
iod.
Maize and Blue defenseman
Graham Cragg had just made
two fine poke checks to halt
dangerous Montreal thrusts
when sophomore Doug Muller
from close in killed a passout
from Heathcott for his first of
two goals. Time: 9:55.
A change of lines and ten sec-
onds later, Chin rifled a shot from
the right boards that bounced off
Auger into the net. Time: 10:05.
The start of last night's contest
was delayed 15 minutes because
the Carabins' train did not arrive
until just before game time, and
the visitors showed the effects of
travel, tiring noticeably in the
final stanza.
Heyliger looks for a much tough-
er contest tonight.
SUMMARY
FIRST PERIOD: 1-Michigan, Chin
(Cooney, Keyes), 17:35.
Penalties: Michigan-Cooney (cross-
checking), Heathcott (tripping), Mc-
Clellan (holding); Montreal-Bisson
(hooking), Charest (tripping); all two
minutes.
SECOND PERIOD: 2-Michigan,
Mullen (Heathcott, Martinson), 9:55;
3-Michigan, Chin (Keyes, Cooney),
10:05; 4-Michigan, Philpott, (McKen-
nell), 16:28; 5--Montreal, Quesnel
(Bruneau, C. Hotte), 18:10.
Penalties: Michigan - Heathcott
(tripping); two minutes.
THIRD PERIOD: 6 - Michigan,
Cooney (Chin), 0:59; 7-Michigan,
Mullen (Heathcott, Martinson), 4:46;
8-Michigan, McClellan (Chin), 7:48;
9-Montreal, Bruneau (Charest), 8:33;
10-Michigan, Keyes (Cooney, Cragg),
12:05; 11-Michigan, Keyes (Cooney,
Chin), 15:42.
Penalties: None.
CINEMA GUlD
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The perfect all year round inexpensive
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1941 TWO DOOR SEDAN-Pontiac, good,
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FOR SALE
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WHITE TIE AND TAILS plus 151, shirt,
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LARGE ASSORTMENT of Christmas
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Phone 8134. Pontiac Rd., 1 block west
of Broadway signal light. )100
1936.2-DOOR SEDAN-Terraplane. Good
condition. Phone 8612. )99
ROOMS FOR RENT
APARTMENT for male students, 1 room
studio with enclosed study porch.
omplete modern kitchen with new re-
frigerator. Clean, well furnished. For
one, $14.00 per week-for two, $16.00.
Share bath. 5 blocks from campus.
Call Les Bennett, Apt. 3, phone 9443.
)32R
LARGE 2-room suite for two male stu-
dents with private kitchen, bath, and
entrance. 1st floor. Newly decorated
and well furnished. $8.00 each per
week. Near campus. Call Les Ben-
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MALE SINGLE ROOM for rent. Linens
furnished. Phone 28797. )33R
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME-Rooms by
day or week. Bath, shower, television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )2R
LARGE SINGLE ROOM for a quiet man
student at 1021 Hill Street. Phone
2-7133. ) 30R
FOR RENT
3-ROOM modern house at Silver Lake,
furnished or unfurnished. $60.00
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15. Ideal for student or employed
couple. Call Ypsilanti 227-M. )15F
ROOMS & SUITES FOR MEN-For those
who'll appreciate congenial landlady.
On campus. Call before 4 p.m. 2-0542.
)11F
ATTRACTIVE four-room suite for 3-5
men. 1402 Hill. Call after 5:30 p.m.
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SUITE for one or two men, across
street School of Education. Every-
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BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING-experienced in theses, tera
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TYPEWRITERS and Fountain Pens -
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Continuous from 1 P.M.
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TYPEWRITER Repair Service and Rent-
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I'M GETTING FRUSTRATED as Helli
Mem-Day has me baffled. Somebody
help ine out. Susie, ph. 2-5618.
MODERN Beauty Shop - Special on
creme oil permanents-machine, ma-
chineless or cold wave, $5.00, shampoo
and set with cream rinse $1.00. Hair-
cut $1.00. Phone 8100. )13P
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TWO 2:30 performance tickets Messiah,
or will trade Saturday for Sunday
tickets. Call 29319. )12X
WANTED TO BUY-Copy of "Sacco-
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Dick Nelson, 3-4187. )6$
WANTEID TO BUY-Tux: 37 long. Call
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MAN'S ENGLISH BICYCLE, 3-1465 )8X
MEN'S ICE SKATES, size 9%j. Phone
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TWO TICKETS Sunday Messiah. Will-
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WANTED ride to Pittsburg or Columbus
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ext. 261. )13T
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Last Time Today
EDMUND O'BRIEN
"WARPATH"
and
"JIM THORPE
ALL-AMERICAN"
SUNDAY thru TUESDAY

04

REFLEX camera, f.5.6 lens, synchronized
shutter, case, $25.00. Phone 5700. )95
TIME
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TIME
to
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Students
makes an excellent X'mas gift
... Handsomely inscribed card
mailed to recipients. Phonf or
write Student Periodical Agen-
cy, 330 Municipal Ct. Bldg.,
2-8242.

e 4v
GRAN't
CRAIN
go5LK
PLUS
STRICTLY
FOR FUN I ;
STRICTLY
I DISUONORABLE~
;: EZIO PINZA
,M,..JA..T.LEIGH

S. L. CINEMA GUILD
and The Gothic Film Society
offer
some facts about
METAMORPHOSIS
(running time-70 min. plus shorp)

f

Who Launders KYER MODEL
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

SPORTS

* * *

1;

HERB COHEN: Night Editor

ORPH EUM
CINEMA
2:30 and 8 P.M.
Today and Sunday

* It is the first full-length 16mm feature made
on a college campus.
* It was shot completely in Ann Arbor.
* It took some 25 students and alumni over a
year to. make it.
" It cost about $5000 (all the bills aren't paid).
* Its technical quality reaches the highest 16mm
standards.
* Its stars are local professional actors.
* It is beng featured in three national maga-
zines next month,

with
Mortar Board
and
Wyvern
presents
The
Southerner
with
Zachary Scott
Betty Field
Added Attraction -
"TALL TALE"
with Burl Ives, and
John White, Will Green
1 1 -A

Starting TODAY

I,... _______

'm

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I

44c until 5 P.M., then 65c

imil

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LATE SHOW
TONIGHT
Last Feature
at l1 P.M.

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come Fil
t he C/1
PHYLLIS THAXTER

I

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"

a.

BOX
OFFKEa
NOW
OPENf

Lndon Films Presents
A Michael Powell
& Emeric Pres:burger
Production
of

co-starring
MOI RA
SHEARER
LEONiDE
MASSINE

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EMEMma

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11 ! 9? I Lys AIN- m I

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