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September 25, 1951 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AGE sr

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1951

___________________.

i1IISPRINGJ( CARNWIVA!*. 1 3UU 1 Dt

WAA, Union Will Co-sponsor
Biannual Michigras Weekend

Panhellenic, Assembly Presidents
Plan New Organizational Activities

C

THE LAW BOOK STORE

This store is

especially equipped

and stocked to supply every need
of the law student; such as.. . case
books, text books, outlines, note-
books, paper, pens, etc.
VETERANS' ACCOUNTS
CAPABLY HANDLED
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE

Although the school year has
Just begun and April is a long way
off, plans will soon be underway
for the 1952 Michigras.
Spring in Ann Arbor brings with
it a weekend of competitive ac-
tivities co-sponsored by the Wom-
en's Athletic Association and, the
Union.
LAST YEAR the event was rep-
resented by Tennis Ball Weekend,
while this year again it will be
time for floats, balloons, shows,
skits, rides, refreshments and
games of skill.
In 1950 the carnival was held
on Friday and Saturday, April
21 and 22, in Yost Field House,
with more than 11,000 people
attending on opening night.
Preparation for Michigras be-
gins with the competition among
campus organizations for alloted
space for booths at the carnival.
Ideas are submitted to the Central
Committee for consideration and
the most fully worked-out plans
are selected.
* * *
FIFTY-EIGHT campus groups,
the largest number in Michigras
history, were chosen to prepare
booths at the 1950 carnival.
Featured for the first time was
a kiddies' matinee, sponsored by
the Ann Arbor Merchants' As-
sociation.
Leading the last Michigras par-
ade were a young boy and girl,
dressed as Lil' Abner and Daisy
Mae. The two children were se-
lected from entrees submitted by
Ann Arbor residents and Univer-
sity students and faculty.

THEME of the parade was "Car-
toon Capers," and the floats, con-
structed by more than 50 Univer-
sity and Ann Arbor organizations,
were take-offs on famous comic
strip characters.
The three winning floats were
awarded trophies, and three
others received honorable men-
tion.
First place last year went to
Sigma Phi Epsilon - Delta Delta
Delta, with their interpretation of
Tarzan and his accompanying apes
and sarong-clad women.
Booth awards are based on
amount of receipts, customers and
general excellence.
Auditions Planned
For Varsity Night
Whether your speciality be train-
ing pet seals or walking a tight-
rope, rthe managers of Varsity
Night would like you to audition
for their show, which will be held
October 26 in Hill Auditorium.
Sponsored by the University
Bands, Varsity Night is an annual
affair. Besides campus talent, at
least two or three professional acts
will be included in the show. Last
year, for instance, a professional
balancing act on a 30 foot ladder
kept the audience in rapt suspense.
Auditions are scheduled at 2 to
5:30 p.m. next Sunday and at the
same time the following Sunday.
Additional appointments may be
made by calling 3-1511, extension
2114.

1216 South University

Phone 3-4436

ii'C

oCLifle~ie

V
Beverly Clarke Heads
Sororities on Campus
One of the busiest coeds -on
campus is the new president of the
Panhellenic Association at the
University, Beverly Clarke.
Beverly hails from Detroit and
it was there at Redford High
School that her interest in outside
activities began.
* . *
AMONG THE many activities
that have kept Beverly busy dur-
ing her stay at the University and
have amazed her Alpha Phi soro-
rity sisters are her committee work
in Frosh Weekend and Sophomore
Cabaret where she served as chair-
man of the special booths com-
mittee.
Many people on campus will
remember her as the tall, lanky
Texan in the Junior Girls' Play
this semester. She has partici-
pated on committees for Michi-
gras, Panhellenic Ball and the
Panhellenic Variety Show.
During the Phoenix drive this
year Beverly was an active mem-
ber of the personnel committee.
She also served as chairman of the
Board of rushing counselors.
* * *
DESPITE HER many activities,
Beverly has managed to maintain
a high scholastic record. In recog-
nition of this and her many ac-
tivities she has been named to
Alpha Lambda Delta, Wyvern and
Motor Board.
As president of Panhellenic
Association, Beverly's duties are
innumerable. Panhellenic spon-
sors both the Panhellenic Ball
and the Panhellenic Variety
Show.
Panhellenic also works with As-
sembly Association to put on many
projects such as Frosh Weekend
and the student-faculty teas.
The president of Panhellenic
also heads the Panhellenic Board
which consists of 8 members and
is the coordinating and governing
body of the Panhellenic Asso-
ciation.
Beverly displays a great amount
of interest and enthusiasm in her
new office and has many plans
for both new and old projects for
the Panhellenic Association.
Speech correction is Beverly's
major. She is also an active sports
participant and lists golf and ten-
nis as her two favorites. "Bev,"
as her friends call her, has spent
many of her summers as a camp
counselor.

BEVERLY CLARKE
* * *

Independent Women
Led by Joan Mintzer
"I believe that outside activities
are as important to a student's life
as studies," said Joan Mintzer,
president of Assembly.
By looking at the record of Miss
Mintzer's high school and Univer-
sity life, one can see this coed
practices what she preaches.
MISS MINTZER began her ac-
tivities in Rutland High School in
Vermont, where she was valedic-
torian and president of her class.
Her interests also led to cheer-
leading, dramatics and playing
in the school band. A member
of the student council, com-
mencement and prom commit-
ties and International Relations
Club, Miss Mintzer was also
chosen as a candidate for Na-
tional Honor Society.
Graduating from Rutland in the
spring of '48, Miss Mintzer entered
the University the next fall and
managed to maintain a 3.2 scho-
lastic average as well as participate
in many, freshman activities.
BECOMING A member of Alpha
Lambda Delta in her freshman
yee, Miss Mintzer has also be-
come associated with Wyvern,
Mortar Board and Senior Society.
She was secretary of the Wolverine
Club and worked on Sophomore
Carbaret and the Phoenix Project.
This Assembly president has
previously been chairman of
Assembly Ball, the Assembly
Personnel Committee and a
member of the Board of Repre-
sentatives of the League.
"I am very interested in Assem-
bly putting out good projects next
year to see independent women be-
come a stronger, more unified
group," she said.
Miss Mintzer is majoring in
speech correction and plans to re-
ceive her masters degree in social
work.
Traveling is one of Joan's main
interests, and she is already plan-
ning a trip to Europe next sum-
mer. She also carries on a steady
correspondence with people locat-
ed in many parts of the world.
Sports, especially basketball,
dancing, reading and symphonic
music are other of Joan's inter-
ests. Her favorite activity, how-
ever, is "studying all types of
people" she meets.

* * *

Dr. Bell Claims
Phys. Ed. Major
Useful to Coed
A physical education major pre-
pares for an interesting and ver-
satile vocation as well as for home
and family life, said Dr. Margaret
Bell, chairman of the womens'
physical education department.
"Physical education opens up
opportunities for teaching chil-
dren, youth and adults, physical
therapy and recreation for youth
or in communities," she added.
Occupational advantages are
numerous, she continued, for .,a
woman with a bachelor of science
in physical education. The de-
mand for women to fill instructor's
positions is much greater than can
be met at the present time, she
said, and the starting salary for
these openings is often $3,000 or
more per year.
During her freshman year, the
woman planning to major in phys-
ical education is advised to elect
English 1 and 2, zoology 1, biolog-
ical chemistry, 2 P.E. and other
liberal arts courses open to fresh-
men.
The second, third and fourth
years are spent in the physical
education school, taking the sci-
ences, psychology and teaching
courses which complete the re-
quirement for a bachelor's degree.
Freshman women who might be
interested in the physical educa-
tion program as a career are urge"
to consult with Dr. Campbell at
Barbour Gymnasium.
Union Sponsors
Bridge Contest
All students are eigilae to com-
pete in the first bridge tournament
of the year which will be held at
7:15 tomorrow in the Union.
Coeds are being permitted for
the first time to play in the Union-
sponsored tournaments. Late per-
mission slips will be given to those
who are competing.
Bridge tournaments will be held
each week throughout the semester
with a winner and runner-up de-
termined at every meet. Winners
of the weekly tournaments will
compete at the end of the year in
a final championship round.
The fee is 35 cents per person
for each tournament. This money
will be used to pay expenses for
the final winners who will be sent
to a national bridge tournament.
The winners of the weekly tour-
naments may play in two addition-
al tournaments without fee costs.
The runner-up each week will be
permitted to play in one additional
tournament without cost.

Y

DAINTY INTIMATE APPAREL

in
,wellknown makes
of
Foundation Garments
Brassieres
House Coats
Kaiser Hosiery

II
/:

; >c ;y o<;;;;;o <;;a o o .o >c.. <;;;;;>
Our version of the (
short cut keeps you chic,
trim and pretty.
Call today
for an
appointment.
STAEBLER
BD'EAU TY SHOP
601 East Liberty.
ANNIVERSARY YEARt.\ ;vafrfriss'

JOAN MINTZER

p'

Meri-Tutorial
Calls for Tutors. .
Members of the Merit-Tutorial
Committee of the League have
issued a call for students to serve
as tutors in all subjects, especially
science courses.
To be eligible for the positions,
students must have maintained a
grade of "A" in subjects outside
their major. Grades of "B" or
better are required if the subject
is their major.
Students, desiring these posi-
tions may call the Merit-Tutorial
Office in the League, or apply in
person at the office.

1

ke Vanc4adren 9
S Nickels Arcade -- Phone 2-2914

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