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September 25, 1951 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

f

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1951.

____________________..

Welcome Students

Hamburgers, Sandwiches,
Salads, etc.
Also Complete Fountain Service
CLARK 'L

Student Prints
Still Available
Tomorrow will be the last day
that over 800 framed prints of fa-
mous paintings and drawings will
be on display at the Rackham
Building and also available for
student rental.
Since the beginning of orienta-
tion week, these prints have been
on exhibit from 8-12 a.m. and 1-5
p.m. every day, for the benefit of
those students who wish to rent
one for the decoration of their
room. The charge for the print is
fifty cents per semester.
During this exhibition period,
students may reserve the prints of
their choice.

1950-'51
Rose Bowl,
Draft Jitters
Mark. Year
Hatcher Replaces
Rutiven at Helm
The year 1950-51 was a signifi-
cant milestone in campus history.
After 22 years of service to the'
University, President Alexander
G. Ruthven retired and Harlan H.:
Hatcher was named to take his 3'
place.
* * *,

The

News

in

* *

* * *

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Retrospect

17 Observatory

Across from Jordan Hall

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SAVE when you SELL and

6

SAVE when you BUY USED BOOKS

at the

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..STU E 7T

BO0*K E

THE DEADLINE for enrollment
under the GI Bill passed and the
veteran's sobering influence gave
way to an attempt to rehabilitate
the old "rah-rah" spirit.
Student enthusiasm strongly
backed a Rose .Bowl football
team and the Phoenix Project
for atomic research.
The issues were tossed around:
academic freedom and discrimina-
tion. And Korea was close-to-
home as male students took phy-
sicals, aptitude exams and prayed.
This is a year at tne University:
Sept. 25. University Registrar
Ira M. Smith blamed the Korean
situation and "unsettled world
conditions" for the first big de-
cline in enrollment since the end
of World War II. Enrollment fig-
ures showed a ten percent decrease
in resident students since the fall
of 1949 with only 18,527 students
on campus.
Sept. 26. In a sudden reversal
of policy, the Student Affairs Com-
mittee granted the Men's and Wo-
men's Glee Clubs exemption from
the eligibility ban of freshmen.
Sept. 27. Official figures showed
students had raised the campus
grade average a mere .01 during
the previous year.
Sept. 30. An aggressive, confident
Michigan State team out-maneuv-
ered the disappointing Wolverines
in registering a 14-7 victory over
their traditional rivals.
Oct. 2. Atom Day was proclaimed
throughout the state by Gov. G.
Mennen Williams, giving official
recognition to the start of the na-
tion-wide fund-raising campaign
for the University's Memorial
Phoenix Project.
Oct. 3 The Daily held a reunion
in celebration of its 60th anniver-
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ROUSING FAREWELL-A wildly cheering crowd of close to 3,000 students gathered in front of
the President's Residence May 22 to pay tribute to retiring University chief Alexander G. Ruthven
and Mrs. Ruthven. A slight drizzle failed to dampen spirits as serenading continued into the night.
* * n * , . U

said would be an integral part of.
the Phoenix Project.
Dec. 11. Pledges to the student
Phoenix drive totalled $100,000.
Dec. 15. Gargoyle returned to,
the roster of official student pub-.
lications as the Board in'Controf
of Student Publications condition-
ally okayed a reinstatement peti-
tion.
More than 6,000 University facu-
ty and non-academic employes re-
ceived salary and wage ,adjust-
ments amounting to approximate-
ly a 10 percent increase.
Dec. 16. Robert H. Stacy sat,
quietly as he heard a Circuit Court
jury return a verdict of guilty
against him in the Haven Hall
arson trial.
Dec. 18. A silver streamliner
glided over the midwestern plains
carrying the Michigan squad on
its way to the classic Rose Bowl
grid battle on New Year's Day
with the Golden Bears of Califor-
nia.
Dec. 19. The student Phoenix
drive closed with $131,079 pledged.
Dec. 20. Thomas Rowe was ap-
pointed as Dean of the College of"
Pharmacy to replace retiring Dean
Charles Stocking.
With an eye to a possible shor -
age of rushees in the future, te
Inter-Fraternity Council house
presidents clamped down on "dir-
ty rushing" with a erie of new
regulations.
Jan. 1. Michigi ( die-hard
gridiron greats ea ned 13 first-
downs and 14 points in the second
half of the 1951 Rose Bowl game
to hand the Big Ten its fifth suc-
cessive victory by beating Califor-
nia, 14-6.
Jan. 6. Wined, dined and a trifle
travel-weary, .Michigan's .R o s e
Bowl champions received a warm
homecoming welcome from a
crowd of 5,000 townspeople and
students as their special train ar-
rived at the Ann Arbor depot.
Jan. 11. Regent Ralph A. Hay-
ward, prominent Michigan busi-
ness and educational leader, died
in University Hospital following
a brain operation.
Jan. 12. Gov. G. Mennen Wil-
liams slashed a $2,637,000 chunk
out of the University's $16,337,00a
(Continued on Page 3)

WHAT:
WHERE:
WHEN:

a non-profit book store
run BY and FOR STUDENTS
rooms 3 L NM,N
Michigan Union
Tues., Sept. 25 and Thurs.,
Sept. 27, 11-12 A.M. and 1-4 P.M.
and Wed., Sept. 26, 10-11 A.M.
and 2-4 P.M.

S S A ! CB *:. . . . ..A : . :. . . . . . . . . . . .

--------------- -

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TH IVI SWR
ABOU BI 11 OLEGE OOTALL

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THE SCREEN

performs a public serv-
ice with this story of
one boy who heat
the body-buying Sys*
tem--and of the girl
who made him a man!

THE LOWDOWN
on the "kept men" of
that Saturday Afternoon
Racket, where bodies
are bought and hearts
are broken so a mob
can cheer!

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From the
celebrated
COSMOPOLITAN
serial!
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sary as the campus student news-
paper.
Oct. 7. Michigan's gridiron ma-
chine began rolling in high gear+
using a long-range ground and
aerial attack to whip the Dart-
mouth Indians, 27-7.
Oct. 10. An all-campus campaign
for signatures for the Crusade of
Freedom scroll got underway.
In a dual move, the Student Af-
fairs Committee granted the Arts
Chorale exemption from the eli-
gibility ban on first-semester
freshmen and gave the group res-
ponsibility for the academic grades
of its freshmen members.
More than 150 Pan-Hellenic
members gathered in the Jeague
to protest a new Dean's office rule
changing the sorority rushing per-
iod to the three weeks following the
fall semester final exam period.
Oct. 11. Robert N. Stacy, thirty-
year-old University graduate stu-
dent and teaching fellow, was
charged with arson after admit-
ting to police that he set the dis-
astrous $3,000,000 Haven Hall fire,
which destroyed the ancient lime-
stone classroom building during
the 1950 final exam period.
Oct. 12. Stacy admitted he set
fires in two other University build-
ings just before the Haven Hall
disaster of June 6.
Oct. 17. The University Confer-
ence of Deans vetoed a Student
Legislature plan for elimination
of Friday classes during the an-
nual Thanksgiving holiday.
Oct. 18. David Lilienthal opened
the 1950-51 lecture series by ri-
diculing the Atomic Energy Com-
mission's policy of keeping all ato-
mic information top-secret.
Oct. 20. University officials an-
nounced the acquisition of $4,000,-
000 worth of theatre stock, on a
pay-as-you-go basis. The move was
seen as an attempt to increase
shrunken endowment revenues.
Oct. 21. The passing and run-
ning brilliance of Charlie Ortmann
and a bounce-back gang of Michi-
gan Wolverines made it a happy
Homecoming Day in the Michigan
Stadium with a convincing 26-13
conquest of the Wisconsin Badgers.
Ann Arbor police picked up 26
students at the game for selling
ten cent football programs.
Oct. 28. A spirited crew of Min-
nesota Gophers put a big dent in
the Wolverines' Rose Bowl hopes
when they came from behind in
the final minutes to deadlock the
highly-favored Maize and Blue
squad, 7-7.
' Nov. 2. Gargoyle, suspended
campus humor magazine operating
from a subterranean stronghold,

was barred from distribution on
campus.
Nov. 4. Snow and an inert Mi-
chigan offense combined to give
the Fighting Illini a 7-0 win in
the worst game for spectators in
Ann Arbor in a decade.
Nov. 5. Students favored the
re-election of Gov. Williams, Sen.
Taft and Gov. Dewey, according to
a Daily poll.
The University moved into the
television field in the first attempt
ever made to pipe college-sponsor-
ed courses into thousands of homes
by video.
Nov. 7. Prof. John P. Dawson of
the Law School was defeated by
his former student George Meader
for the Second District Congres-
sional seat.
Nov. 8. University politichl sci-
entists attributed GOP election
wins to the Administration's Far
East policy and the McCarthy
probes.
The Daily exposed student-run
football pools on campus, unnotic-
ed previously by both city and
University officials.
Nov. 9. Ann Arbor police and
the county prosecutor's officebe-
gan a joint investigation of cam-
pus bookies following The Daily
article.
Nov. 11. Michigan's football team
abandoned their previously indis-
pensable pass offense in effecting
a 20-7 win over underdog Indiana.
Nov. 13. The Student Phoenix
fund-raising drive got off to a
quick start as four house groups hit
80% membership contributions on
'the first day of the campaign.
Nov. 15. The Student Legislature
voted to ask the Student Affairs
Committee to clamp a six-year
time limit on fraternities for get-
ting rid of discriminatory clauses
in their constitutions.
Psi Upsilon fraternity was fined
$2,000 and put on social probation
till June for holding "a drinking
party.
Nov. 17. With the first week of
the student Phoenix fund-raising
drive nearly over, Phoenix officials
were able to total up pledges
ambunting to $16,000.
Nov. 18. Michigan's improving
Wolverines parlayed a crisp run-
ning attack and a hard-charging
defense into a 34-23 win over
Northwestern's stubborn Wildcats.
Nov. 22. University regulations,
professors' instructions and blue
books to the contrary, thousands
of students tossed textbooks aside
and headed home a day early for
the Thanksgiving holiday.
Nov. 25. The relentless Wolver-

A HEARTY WELCOME IS
EXTENDED TO THE CLASS OF
1955
WHEN DOWNTOWN, DROP IN AND VISIT
OUR STORE. IT'S ALWAYS A PLEASURE TO
SHOW OUR MERCHANDISE.
WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE
OF NATIONALLY KNOWN MERCHANDISE

i.

Van Heusen &,
Hyde Park and

Mallory Hats
Manhattan Shirts, Neckwear, Pajamas
McGregor Sportswear
Alligator Rainwear
Winston Suits, Topcoats and Overcoats

Interwoven Hosiery - Wembly Ties
Stradivari Sport Shirts
THE DOWNTOWN STORE FOR MICHIGAN MEN
"We Serve to &Serve agdL
309 SOUTH MAIN STREET

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ines plowed through a foot of snow
which blanketed the Columbus
playing field to upset the Ohio
State Buckeyes, 9-3, winning the
Big Ten championship and a trip
to the Rose Bowl.
Nov. 28. Police arrested two stu-
dents as the brains behind the
football pools which operated on
campus for five weeks during the
fall semester.
Dec. 8. With 1,200 Rose Bowl
tickets distributed to students and
faculty, weary athletic ticket office
workers turned to the gigantic
task of splitting up the remaining
ducats among thousands of alum-
ni.
Dec. 9. General Motors granted
the University $1,500,000 to estab-
lish an Institute of Industrial
Health which President Ruthven

COLUMBIA
PICTURES
presents

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STUDENTS_-
solve your
LAUNDRY PROBLEM
Do your entire laundry in half on hour
at our store. Wash, rinse, and damp-
dry clothes automatically in Westing-
house Laundromat automatic washers.
DRYERS AVAILABLE
TO DRY CLOTHES COMPLETELY
SHIRTS - QUICK SERVICED
on our

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nothing clannish about
Arrow Plaids
...they're the best-liked

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sports shirts on campus!

Senator J. William
FULBRIGHT
Says: "A graphic
portrayal of
shocking practices
as I know thrn."

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